News Kanye West is a suspect in another battery investigation after he allegedly punched an 18-year-old boy for hurling racial abuse at his fiancée, Kim Kardashian.

West is already facing charges of battery after a separate altercation with a photographer, Daniel Ramos, at LAX Airport last summer

Diana's driver tipped off paparazzi

Henri Paul, driver of the car in which Diana, Princess of Wales, was killed, tipped off waiting photographers that she was about to leave the Ritz Hotel in Paris, sources close to the investigation said yesterday.

Books: Elvis and Pablo say cheese

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Alcohol and speed killed Diana, not paparazzi

A fatal combination of alcohol and speed, and not the paparazzi, were responsible for the crash which killed Diana, Princess of Wales, sources close to the French police investigation said yesterday.

Press code aims to outlaw paparazzi pictures

New restrictions should put a stop to the sort of intrusive photography endured by the Princess of Wales. Paul McCann, Media Correspondent, looks at the problems of putting them into practice.

Media: Wakeham promises tough new privacy rules

Lord Wakeham has promised that the Press Complaints Commission's new code will impose the toughest restrictions on newspaper behaviour, writes Paul McCann.

Why the tabloids are not to be trusted

Self-policing will last only until the next irresistible story comes along, argues Stephen Glover

Letter: The press, not the Royals, hounded Diana

I object strongly to the way in which your article ("A day of emotion", 7 September) manipulated Earl Spencer's funeral address to make out it did something it didn't. It was not "a devastating attack on the Royal Family". The example given is that of the "anguish" Diana suffered. But this refers to the hounding she received from the press. Your writers show they knew perfectly well what he meant after he promised to "shield the princes from the paparazzi".

A vodka marked the spot as a low-life hero passed into legend

`Jeff always said it would be just his luck to go on the same day as the Queen Mother ...'

Ask me this but don't mention that

This week everybody's talking about press intrusiveness. Now it's famous Martin Amis, publicising his new novel and worrying about his privacy. Anne Treneman doesn't hear him

Weasel words in the last-chance saloon

The most nauseating apology for our grotesque press is blaming readers' taste

Editors fall out over privacy vow

The unity among newspaper editors about how to cover the Royal Family after the death of Diana, Princess of Wales, fell apart yesterday when the editor of the Daily Telegraph described the Daily Mail as "disgusting".

More newspapers pledge royal privacy

A new era in relations between newspapers and the Royal Family seemed likely yesterday, following Earl Spencer's stinging attack on the press in his eulogy at Saturday's funeral of Diana, Princess of Wales.

Pictures worth taking

No snatch pictures of celebrities can be seen at the ninth Festival of Photojournalism being held at Perpignan in south-west France, which ends on Sunday. This is a meeting place for true believers in photojournalism, for practitioners who situate themselves on the line that began with Fenton's pictures of the Crimean war and runs through Cartier-Bresson to Don McCullin (who has an exhibition opening at the Barbican in London this week) and onwards. The young photographers who tour the cafe tables in Perpignan looking for picture editors to whom they can show their work have been shooting in slums rather than in Mayfair, in Kabul rather than Paris; they have been taking pictures of tanks, not of chauffeur-driven limousines.

Diana 1961-1997: The reaction - Editors start work on new privacy code

Moves to tighten the Press and media's code of practice over privacy will begin in earnest this week.

Diana 1961-1997: The myth - Taking her place in the spiritual pantheon

From Christ to Presley, we've been here before, says Dorothy Rowe
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In this photo illustration a school student eats a hamburger as part of his lunch which was brought from a fast food shop near his school, on October 5, 2005 in London, England. The British government has announced plans to remove junk food from school lunches. From September 2006, food that is high in fat, sugar or salt will be banned from meals and removed from vending machines in schools across England. The move comes in response to a campaign by celebrity TV chef Jamie Oliver to improve school meals.
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
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'I’ll tell you what I would not serve - lamb and potatoes'

US ambassador hits out at stodgy British food
Radio Times female powerlist: A 'revolution' in TV gender roles

A 'revolution' in TV gender roles

Inside the Radio Times female powerlist
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James Frey's literary treasure hunt

Riddling trilogy could net you $3m
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Fitbit: Because the tingle feels so good

What David Sedaris learnt about the world from his fitness tracker
Saudis risk new Muslim division with proposal to move Mohamed’s tomb

Saudis risk new Muslim division with proposal to move Mohamed’s tomb

Second-holiest site in Islam attracts millions of pilgrims each year
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The big names to look for this fashion week

This week, designers begin to show their spring 2015 collections in New York
Will Self: 'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

Will Self takes aim at Orwell's rules for writing plain English
Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Toy guns proving a popular diversion in a country flooded with the real thing
Al Pacino wows Venice

Al Pacino wows Venice

Ham among the brilliance as actor premieres two films at festival
Neil Lawson Baker interview: ‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.

Neil Lawson Baker interview

‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.
The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

The model for a gadget launch

Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
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A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering