News

Actor took on three armed soldiers who had surrounded star and crew while they were filming later series of Extreme World 3

Philippe Croizon swan the 12-mile stretch across the Red Sea

Limbless man swims Red Sea

A Frenchman who lost all his limbs has completed the latest stage of his round-the-world swimming odyssey, reaching Jordan using custom-made flippers to propel himself through the Red Sea from Egypt.

African deal for mines is scrapped as valuation fears mount

Mineral-rich Guinea is scrapping a controversial mining deal after fears it represented bad value for the country's valuable assets, keenly in demand from the likes of Rio Tinto and Brazil's Vale.

Last Night’s Viewing: Secret Eaters, Channel 4
Felicity Kendal's Indian Shakespeare Quest, BBC2

According to Anna Richardson, "we each make about 200 eating decisions a day". Judging from the ballooning of the national waistline, pretty much all of those decisions are "Oh go on then. I shouldn't but I will".

Roast guinea fowl with mustard fruits

Roast guinea fowl with mustard fruits

Serves 2-4

Cirque Mandingue / The Great Spalvados, Roundhouse, London (3/5, 4/5)

Cirque Mandingue, who open the Roundhouse’s Circusfest season, have strong and exuberant acrobats, slightly hampered by a clichéd sense of theatre. The core team do pyramid balancing, tumbling and stomping dance moves. The energy dips when they start clowning or telling stories.

Amelia Earhart, the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean, disappeared with her navigator over the Pacific in 1937

New clue sparks bid to solve mystery of missing aviator Amelia Earhart

Hillary Clinton launches search after photograph appears to show fate of US pioneer's aeroplane

Last Night's Viewing: Make Bradford British, Channel 4<br />Our Man in Ibiza, Channel 4

If Rashid isn't British, I'm not sure that anyone qualifies. A big, genial ex-rugby league player, he calls an alleyway a "snicket" and says "job's a good'un" when something's gone well. He's about as Bradford as they come – the only awkward detail being that you now have to specify which district of Bradford you're talking about. Channel 4 had chosen one of Britain's most segregated cities for its experiment in multicultural understanding – Make Bradford British – and what it hoped to work out was what common values might unite a citizenry so sharply divided by race and class. It was Big Brother with a social mission – eight pointedly different people invited to share a house and settle their differences, amicably if possible, though obviously a little friction wasn't going to go amiss.

James Ward shows off his stationery collection at his home

The Write Stuff: Britain's stationery fetish

From a £400 Alice Temperley Filofax to a gold-nibbed Montblanc pen, Britain's stationery fetish is refusing to be erased by technology

Last Night's Viewing: Daddy Daycare, Channel 4<br />Versailles, BBC2

"I get the feeling sometimes that the staff want us to fail," said Stefan, one of three men who featured in Daddy Daycare, a Channel 4 reality series designed to address a social crisis that almost certainly doesn't exist. I don't mean for a moment, by the way, that there are no incompetent or deadbeat fathers out there. Or that it isn't useful for even the most well-intentioned man to learn some lessons about childcare. But the implication that today's men are unusually bad at fatherhood ("Modern British life has spawned a generation of dysfunctional dads") is surely not true. Even the horror statistic used to underwrite this exercise in mental re-education could be seen from another angle as a silver lining: "Almost half of all mothers feel fathers don't do their share," said the voiceover at the beginning of the show. Really? You mean that as many as 50 per cent of mothers now feel fathers do? The truth of it was that it wasn't the staff at the south London nursery Stefan had been sent to who wanted him to fail. It was the production company. And even they only wanted him to fail a bit comically in the first half so that he could recover in the second, make a public act of contrition, and score a modest triumph before the final credits.

Hundreds saved from rough seas as ferry sinks in Papua New Guinea

Rescuers plucked more than 230 survivors from the sea after a ferry sank yesterday with up to 350 people on board.

Papua New Guinea rejects mutineers' demand

Prime Minister Peter O'Neill refused to step down despite a mutiny Thursday by soldiers who seized Papua New Guinea's military headquarters and demanded that he cede power to his ousted predecessor.

Smith: his work at Porton led to a vaccine against plague

Professor Harry Smith: Leading authority on virulence and bacterial infection

The microbiologist Harry Smith was a leading expert on bacterial infection and virulence. Initially eschewing academia for a post at Porton, he subsequently took up a professorship at the University of Birmingham.

The Netherlands: No inquiry for cannibal stunt

Dutch prosecutors say they are not investigating a case of apparent cannibalism on a TV show in which presenters seemed to eat tiny pieces of each others' flesh.

Prosecutors will not investigate Dutch TV cannibalism

Dutch prosecutors are not investigating a case of apparent cannibalism on a Dutch TV show in which presenters appeared to consume tiny pieces of each others' flesh that had been surgically removed.

The presenters dressed in suits and sat on a candlelit set for the human meal

Come dine on me: Dutch TV hosts 'eat each other'

Two Dutch TV presenters will claim to be making broadcasting history tonight when millions of viewers tune in to watch them eating flesh surgically removed from each other's bodies in an unprecedented act of prime-time cannibalism.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
Prices correct as of 23 January 2015
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee
World War Z author Max Brooks honours WW1's Harlem Hellfighters in new graphic novel

Max Brooks honours Harlem Hellfighters

The author talks about race, legacy and his Will Smith film option to Tim Walker
Why the league system no longer measures up

League system no longer measures up

Jon Coles, former head of standards at the Department of Education, used to be in charge of school performance rankings. He explains how he would reform the system
Valentine's Day cards: 5 best online card shops

Don't leave it to the petrol station: The best online card shops for Valentine's Day

Can't find a card you like on the high street? Try one of these sites for individual, personalised options, whatever your taste
Diego Costa: Devil in blue who upsets defences is a reminder of what Liverpool have lost

Devil in blue Costa is a reminder of what Liverpool have lost

The Reds are desperately missing Luis Suarez, says Ian Herbert
Ashley Giles: 'I'll watch England – but not as a fan'

Ashley Giles: 'I'll watch England – but not as a fan'

Former one-day coach says he will ‘observe’ their World Cup games – but ‘won’t be jumping up and down’
Greece elections: In times like these, the EU has far more dangerous adversaries than Syriza

Greece elections

In times like these, the EU has far more dangerous adversaries than Syriza, says Patrick Cockburn
Holocaust Memorial Day: Nazi victims remembered as spectre of prejudice reappears

Holocaust Memorial Day

Nazi victims remembered as spectre of prejudice reappears over Europe
Fortitude and the Arctic attraction: Our fascination with the last great wilderness

Magnetic north

The Arctic has always exerted a pull, from Greek myth to new thriller Fortitude. Gerard Gilbert considers what's behind our fascination with the last great wilderness