Papua New Guinea

Farhh and few will face Frankel

Quite how hollow a victory would have beckoned Frankel at Goodwood next week, but for the sporting intervention of Sheikh Mohammed, became evident yesterday when only seven others remained in contention for the Group One Qipco Sussex Stakes. These include his own pacemaker, Bullet Train. Fortunately the sheikh had already committed his Godolphin stable to supplementing Farhh, an excellent second to Nathaniel in the Eclipse last time. That colt was duly added to the field yesterday for a fee of £19,500. Even so, a lap of honour so surely beckons the unbeaten champion that Coral offer odds of just 1-20. "Though the addition of Farhh ensures a new foe, it will still be one of the biggest shocks ever seen on a racetrack if Frankel does not make it win No 12," said the firm's spokesman, David Stevens.

Limbless man swims Red Sea

A Frenchman who lost all his limbs has completed the latest stage of his round-the-world swimming odyssey, reaching Jordan using custom-made flippers to propel himself through the Red Sea from Egypt.

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Two PMs and rival police chiefs leave Papua New Guinea in chaos

Papua New Guinea, the resource-rich, volatile Pacific nation to Australia's north, is entering a fourth day of political chaos today, with two men vying to run the police force, two men – each with his own cabinet – claiming to be the prime minister, and a governor-general dumped for taking sides.

Mark Hix's pintade au vin

In France, cooking a coq au vin is part of the national heritage – you just walk into your local butcher's and pop a coq in your basket. In this country, the dish doesn't translate so well – apart from anything else it isn't easy to find a cock bird. The point of using a cock bird for coq au vin is that the meat is a bit tougher, tastes better and is perfect for long, slow cooking so that the wine flavour permeates the dish.