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Paula Radcliffe

Paula Radcliffe set for fifth Olympic Games

Paula Radcliffe will become only the third British track and field athlete to be selected for five Olympics after her place in Team GB for London 2012 was confirmed today.

Is the show over for Beyoncé?

She always said she'd give up performing to have a family when she hit 30. Now she's 29 and pregnant. Rob Sharp reports

Keitany lets her feet do talking in challenge for Radcliffe

There are 466 days to go before London welcomes the world to the 2012 Olympic Games. It seems Paula Radcliffe will need every one of them if she is to catch up with the painfully shy little Kenyan woman who made a big statement of intent on the road from Blackheath to The Mall yesterday.

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Twell follows Radcliffe on to the road

Steph Twell, the Commonwealth Games bronze medallist, makes her debut over 10 miles at the Bupa Great South Run tomorrow, and Brendan Foster believes it could be a step to her becoming Britain's next long-distance superstar.

Bright start to season keeps Ennis on track for heptathlon glory

It was just an hour's drive for Jessica Ennis yesterday, a 57-mile hop from Sheffield to the Paula Radcliffe Track on the outskirts of Loughborough. There are still 795 days to go before the South Yorkshirewoman carries the nation's hopes into the Olympic arena down the M1 in London. The one-eyed mascots are in place and work has started on the running track and the in-field at the 2012 stadium. In the meantime, Ennis is keeping encouragingly ahead of schedule in her quest to present as a talismanic home figure for the main track and field arena.

2020 vision: Lily Allen returns from obscurity to light up the

I know, I know, you've hardly woken up after the King's Speech and you're still recovering from the Doctor Who Christmas Special (Florence Welch – the best doctor ever). But let's do a bit of time-travelling of our own, back across the past decade in the arts, way back to Copenhagen at the end of 2009. Remember the climate-change conference? If it yielded little else, at least it gave us David Hare's The Green Machine. His one-man, real-time, tour-de-force staging of the final 36 hours of the conference, playing 14 heads of state (with his quiff as his only prop), was performed once only, thank God, and has gone down in theatrical legend. Were you one of the seven people said to have stayed awake until the word-for-word recreation of the 4.30am treaty ratification? Bravo!