Paula Radcliffe

Radcliffe suffers new injury setback as Pavey prevails on 2012 course

The veteran warrior of the women's marathon was back in action on the streets of London yesterday. For the wounded Paula Radcliffe, it proved to be a losing battle. In the city where she forged her reputation as the finest female marathon runner of all time, making a winning debut in 2002 and clocking a stunning world record in 2003, the 37-year-old Briton was beaten not just by two domestic rivals but also by the latest injury blow to have struck her on the road to an Olympic marathon.

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The Week in Radio: A sports commentary that goes the distance

It's a fact unwisely overlooked by all those people gearing up to run Sunday's marathon that as Phidippides, the first marathon runner, hit the final ribbon in Athens he promptly dropped dead. It doesn't stop thousands doing the marathon of course, or indeed banging on about it afterwards, so it's a relief to discover that there is actually an interesting subject to talk about in the world of running. As explored in The Sub-Two-Hour Marathon: Sport's Holy Grail, it's the race to beat the current record of two hours, three minutes and 59 seconds.

Farah turns on the heat in Edinburgh

A new year, a new departure for Mo Farah, Britain's male athlete of 2010. "If you can't beat 'em, join 'em," has been a philosophy that has served the 27-year-old leading light of European distance running well with his regular training trips to Kenya to train with the global elite. This week, though, the European 5,000m and 10,000m champion will head off to New Mexico to train with some of the Americans he beat in the feature race in the Bupa Great Edinburgh Cross Country on Saturday.

Twell follows Radcliffe on to the road

Steph Twell, the Commonwealth Games bronze medallist, makes her debut over 10 miles at the Bupa Great South Run tomorrow, and Brendan Foster believes it could be a step to her becoming Britain's next long-distance superstar.