News A Pakistani health worker gives a polio vaccine to children in a poor neighborhood that hosts displaced people from Pakistani tribal areas and Afghan refugees, on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan

Billionaire philanthropist spoke after polio workers were killed in Pakistan

Cricket: England hesitate in face of history

Third Test: Openers see off West Indies' initial onslaught but Crawley's unnecessary run-out precipitates familiar sense of uncertainty; Rain intervenes as tourists lose momentum after Stewart heroics

An everyday tale of sex in Bucks and rock 'n' roll

Vanessa Thorpe meets the woman who has exposed the dark, seedy underbelly of, er, Aylesbury

Cricket: Ultimate test of love for a cricket nation

Tony Cozier looks back on a week when football stole the applause in Jamaica

Cricket: Leicestershire re-sign a `fitter, stronger' Lewis

Chris Lewis, frequently described as the best all-rounder in England, arrived back at Leicestershire yesterday after six years away "fitter, stronger and more determined than ever".

Dutch double act put up fight

Worcestershire 336-6 Netherlands 225 Worcestershire win by 111 runs

The right of Man to know his past must be upheld by law

Last week, a debonair gentleman named Jonathan Tokeley-Parry went down for six years in jail. A self-styled "restorer" of antiquities, he had been convicted of handling carvings and statuary looted from tombs in Egypt. In England, there is no law against buying stolen antiquities abroad. Tokely-Parry's mistake was to receive the objects - well knowing that they had been looted for him by illegal diggers in the Saqqara necropolis - on British territory.

Train crash kills 126 in Pakistan

Rescue workers used blowtorches to cut through twisted wreckage trying to rescue trapped passengers from an express that jumped its tracks in eastern Punjab yesterday, killing at least 126 people and injuring another 175 in Pakistan's worst train crash for seven years.

Crowd trouble mars win

Crowd trouble marred Pakistan's 77-run victory over Zimbabwe in the third and final one-day international in Peshawar yesterday. Police used batons to control some of the 35,000-strong crowd who threw stones, bottles, fruit and other projectiles, causing seven stoppages that totalled 81 minutes.

Obituary: Admiral Sir Anthony Griffin

Admiral Sir Anthony Griffin was the epitome of the versatile and talented naval officer whose life's work fell into two parts. There was his service in the Royal Navy and, following his retirement, his long effort to make the country aware of the importance of the sea at a time when it had become fashionable to dismiss ships and their associated industries and professions as tired and spent forces.

Obituary: Dr Najibullah

Najibullah (like many Afghans he only had one name) was a great survivor at a time of particular turbulence in Afghanistan. Installed as president in 1986 during the Soviet occupation of his country, he clung to power until 1992 - for nearly three years after the Soviet Red Army had pulled all its troops out. But he met an especially violent end at the hands of the victorious Taleban movement, just hours after their forces had swept up from the east and captured the Afghan capital, Kabul.

Iranians 'buying ex-Soviet uranium'

Nuclear smuggling: The West fears dangerous material could pass to terrorists as Afghans peddle contraband to highest bidder

A YEAR OF LOOTING DANGEROUSLY

Afghanistan's warlords are abandoning opium-selling in favour of a more lucrative fund-raising activity: looting and smuggling their country's archaeological treasures. Culturally, the effects have been catastrophic; and that is not the worst of it. The conduits opened by the drugs and artefacts are now carrying a much more lethal cargo. The latest illegal trade is in material for nuclear arms

Hiding behind closed doors

Derek Pringle looks at the paranoia afflicting England's reluctant tourists; While Atherton explores the sights and sounds of Pakistan his players lock themselves away in their hotel rooms

Silk's magic carpet

CARPET shops abound in Pakistan. To the uninitiated and casual browser, the choice is almost as daunting as the haggling that traditionally precedes the sale. This can involve long and protracted negotiation, and patience is essential. This, of course, is difficult in the face of cunning salesmanship, as Waqar of Peshawar, the Carpet Palace's very own Arthur Daley proved. Waqar sold Graham Gooch, Allan Lamb and our own Derek Pringle several carpets during the 1987 World Cup, and England's recent stay there proved even more lucrative.

Sticks and stones and mobile phones

CRICKET WORLD CUP: After a cautious start, the crowds are growing, the local media are becoming restless and Pakistan enter the tournament today. Robert Winder reports from Delhi
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