News A Pakistani health worker gives a polio vaccine to children in a poor neighborhood that hosts displaced people from Pakistani tribal areas and Afghan refugees, on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan

Billionaire philanthropist spoke after polio workers were killed in Pakistan

Cricket: England hesitate in face of history

Third Test: Openers see off West Indies' initial onslaught but Crawley's unnecessary run-out precipitates familiar sense of uncertainty; Rain intervenes as tourists lose momentum after Stewart heroics

An everyday tale of sex in Bucks and rock 'n' roll

Vanessa Thorpe meets the woman who has exposed the dark, seedy underbelly of, er, Aylesbury

Cricket: Ultimate test of love for a cricket nation

Tony Cozier looks back on a week when football stole the applause in Jamaica

Cricket: Leicestershire re-sign a `fitter, stronger' Lewis

Chris Lewis, frequently described as the best all-rounder in England, arrived back at Leicestershire yesterday after six years away "fitter, stronger and more determined than ever".

Dutch double act put up fight

Worcestershire 336-6 Netherlands 225 Worcestershire win by 111 runs

The right of Man to know his past must be upheld by law

Last week, a debonair gentleman named Jonathan Tokeley-Parry went down for six years in jail. A self-styled "restorer" of antiquities, he had been convicted of handling carvings and statuary looted from tombs in Egypt. In England, there is no law against buying stolen antiquities abroad. Tokely-Parry's mistake was to receive the objects - well knowing that they had been looted for him by illegal diggers in the Saqqara necropolis - on British territory.

Train crash kills 126 in Pakistan

Rescue workers used blowtorches to cut through twisted wreckage trying to rescue trapped passengers from an express that jumped its tracks in eastern Punjab yesterday, killing at least 126 people and injuring another 175 in Pakistan's worst train crash for seven years.

Crowd trouble mars win

Crowd trouble marred Pakistan's 77-run victory over Zimbabwe in the third and final one-day international in Peshawar yesterday. Police used batons to control some of the 35,000-strong crowd who threw stones, bottles, fruit and other projectiles, causing seven stoppages that totalled 81 minutes.

Obituary: Admiral Sir Anthony Griffin

Admiral Sir Anthony Griffin was the epitome of the versatile and talented naval officer whose life's work fell into two parts. There was his service in the Royal Navy and, following his retirement, his long effort to make the country aware of the importance of the sea at a time when it had become fashionable to dismiss ships and their associated industries and professions as tired and spent forces.

Obituary: Dr Najibullah

Najibullah (like many Afghans he only had one name) was a great survivor at a time of particular turbulence in Afghanistan. Installed as president in 1986 during the Soviet occupation of his country, he clung to power until 1992 - for nearly three years after the Soviet Red Army had pulled all its troops out. But he met an especially violent end at the hands of the victorious Taleban movement, just hours after their forces had swept up from the east and captured the Afghan capital, Kabul.

Iranians 'buying ex-Soviet uranium'

Nuclear smuggling: The West fears dangerous material could pass to terrorists as Afghans peddle contraband to highest bidder

A YEAR OF LOOTING DANGEROUSLY

Afghanistan's warlords are abandoning opium-selling in favour of a more lucrative fund-raising activity: looting and smuggling their country's archaeological treasures. Culturally, the effects have been catastrophic; and that is not the worst of it. The conduits opened by the drugs and artefacts are now carrying a much more lethal cargo. The latest illegal trade is in material for nuclear arms

Hiding behind closed doors

Derek Pringle looks at the paranoia afflicting England's reluctant tourists; While Atherton explores the sights and sounds of Pakistan his players lock themselves away in their hotel rooms

Silk's magic carpet

CARPET shops abound in Pakistan. To the uninitiated and casual browser, the choice is almost as daunting as the haggling that traditionally precedes the sale. This can involve long and protracted negotiation, and patience is essential. This, of course, is difficult in the face of cunning salesmanship, as Waqar of Peshawar, the Carpet Palace's very own Arthur Daley proved. Waqar sold Graham Gooch, Allan Lamb and our own Derek Pringle several carpets during the 1987 World Cup, and England's recent stay there proved even more lucrative.

Sticks and stones and mobile phones

CRICKET WORLD CUP: After a cautious start, the crowds are growing, the local media are becoming restless and Pakistan enter the tournament today. Robert Winder reports from Delhi
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Minoan Crete and Santorini
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On your feet! Spending at least two hours a day standing reduces the risk of heart attacks, cancer and diabetes, according to new research

On your feet!

Spending half the day standing 'reduces risk of heart attacks and cancer'
Liverpool close in on Milner signing

Liverpool close in on Milner signing

Reds baulk at Christian Benteke £32.5m release clause
With scores of surgeries closing, what hope is there for the David Cameron's promise of 5,000 more GPs and a 24/7 NHS?

The big NHS question

Why are there so few new GPs when so many want to study medicine?
Big knickers are back: Thongs ain't what they used to be

Thongs ain't what they used to be

Big knickers are back
Thurston Moore interview

Thurston Moore interview

On living in London, Sonic Youth and musical memoirs
In full bloom

In full bloom

Floral print womenswear
From leading man to Elephant Man, Bradley Cooper is terrific

From leading man to Elephant Man

Bradley Cooper is terrific
In this the person to restore our trust in the banks?

In this the person to restore our trust in the banks?

Dame Colette Bowe - interview
When do the creative juices dry up?

When do the creative juices dry up?

David Lodge thinks he knows
The 'Cher moment' happening across fashion just now

Fashion's Cher moment

Ageing beauty will always be more classy than all that booty
Thousands of teenage girls enduring debilitating illnesses after routine school cancer vaccination

Health fears over school cancer jab

Shock new Freedom of Information figures show how thousands of girls have suffered serious symptoms after routine HPV injection
Fifa President Sepp Blatter warns his opponents: 'I forgive everyone, but I don't forget'

'I forgive everyone, but I don't forget'

Fifa president Sepp Blatter issues defiant warning to opponents
Extreme summer temperatures will soon cause deaths of up to 1,700 more Britons a year, says government report

Weather warning

Extreme summer temperatures will soon cause deaths of up to 1,700 more Britons a year, says government report
LSD: Speaking to volunteer users of the drug as trials get underway to see if it cures depression and addiction

High hopes for LSD

Meet the volunteer users helping to see if it cures depression and addiction
German soldier who died fighting for UK in Battle of Waterloo should be removed from museum display and given dignified funeral, say historians

Saving Private Brandt

A Belgian museum's display of the skeleton of a soldier killed at Waterloo prompts calls for him to be given a dignified funeral