Voices

The United States has done it. The Philippines and China too. Even Hong Kong has said it will destroy some of its contraband ivory. But ahead of a conservation conference in London next month where world leaders will descend to seek a solution to wildlife crime, the debate about the future of stockpiles is set to heat up.

Time is running out fast for Tanzania’s elephant herds

With poachers now killing almost 11,000 a year for their ivory, urgent steps need to be be taken to stop the cull

The conversation: Environmental activist Laurens de Groot on running from seal clubbers and why you don't mess with Russia

Sea Shepherd would aim to scupper missions by any means, whether it was throwing foul-smelling acid or sinking ships. At what point did you join?

Elephant Appeal: Coming out of the line of fire

Keleshi Parukusa was trusted with protecting rhinos – but the money on offer from poaching proved too tempting for him, he confesses

Rangers must be able to combat heavily armed poachers

Charity Appeal: The weapons that bring death to the savannah

Elephant poachers are using firearms left over from Mozambique’s civil war to slaughter elephants in neighbouring Tanzania

Elephant Appeal: The Kenyan canine unit putting elephant poachers off the scent

The business of protecting wildlife has now become an extremely professional and militarised affair

Prince William recently established United for Wildlife, an alliance of seven leading conservation bodies, to try to end poaching

Prince William calls for end to 'greed-driven poaching epidemic'

The Duke of Cambridge yesterday called on the world to halt Africa's "poaching epidemic" after he joined Labour leader Ed Miliband in becoming the latest public figures to back The Independent on Sunday's Christmas appeal.

Elephant Appeal: Why conservation is about forging a friendship

Farmers have had crops repeatedly destroyed by marauding elephants

At this rate, elephants will be wiped out within 10 years

The illegal ivory trade is funding terrorist groups

Elephants could be being slaughtered far quicker than previous figures suggest

In some areas, elephant populations have dropped by a staggering 80 per cent in six years

Kenya Wildlife Service rangers live on the edge of Ramuruti forest in Laikipia, Kenya where they patrol as a way to deter poachers

The human cost of the demand for ivory

Poachers have killed 1,000 rangers in a decade

Elephant Appeal: Where is your money going?

How your donations will help Space for Giants protect the elephants

US TV presenter Melissa Bachman poses with a dead male lion in South Africa

Elephant Appeal: The night of the hunter

Is there a place for hunting in conservation, with the money it earns put back in to stop poaching?

Elephant Appeal: No more deaths on the savannah... politicians must act

It’s not too late to do something, but it will be soon

Ronnie Wood for the Elephant Appeal: No more deaths on the savannah... politicians must act

I’m lucky, in a way. I’ve seen the devastation with my own eyes. The rotting carcasses with their heads removed, and the little orphaned babies. When crocodiles and lions kill elephants, they go for the babies, which is heartbreaking to watch when you see it on television. But poachers go for the biggest ones they can, and that means orphans.

Kenyan game rangers with the carcass of an elephant killed by poachers

Indyplus Christmas Campaign: 10 things you need to know about elephant poaching

It is a familiar cause, but it has never been more urgent. Last year, tens of thousands of Africa's elephants were killed to supply illegal ivory to markets throughout the world. Increasingly, revenue generated from this blood ivory is being used to fuel war and terrorism in Africa.

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