Voices

The United States has done it. The Philippines and China too. Even Hong Kong has said it will destroy some of its contraband ivory. But ahead of a conservation conference in London next month where world leaders will descend to seek a solution to wildlife crime, the debate about the future of stockpiles is set to heat up.

Sturgeon: On the edge of extinction

Caviar could be a thing of the past as poaching and poverty are killing the once-mighty sturgeon. Heleen Van Guest reports from Zelenga, Russia

Rare rhino killed in national park

A javan rhino, one of the world's rarest large mammals, has been found shot dead with its horn chopped off in a national park.

Wigan belatedly respond to Maguire's call

Wigan 28 Huddersfield 10

Swaziland's No 1 lady detective wins green prize

Thuli Brilliance Makama is not everyone's idea of an environmental hero.

O'Driscoll urges Ireland to adapt to laws

Brian O'Driscoll insists Ireland must adapt to the controversial new interpretation of the tackle law as soon as possible.

Square Mile's gamekeeper prepares to turn poacher

As the outgoing Takeover Panel chief, Robert Hingley, gets set to rejoin his old investment house, Simon Evans finds him in fighting form – despite Cadbury

With the death of Boa Sr, her people and their songs fall silent forever

Final survivor of ancient tribe spoke of the sadness of having no one left to talk to

Letters: The voting system

Let disaffected voters express their anger

Nick Herbert: A unique chance to choke demand for ivory once and for all

The front page of this newspaper yesterday provided a stark reminder of the problem facing global elephant populations. At the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) in March the international community have a choice. Either support the further ivory stockpile sales proposed by Tanzania and Zambia and risk further fuelling poaching, or support the proposals by countries including Kenya, Rwanda and Sierra Leone to ban any further discussion about these so-called "one-off sales" for 20 years.

Robbie Marsland: Don't underestimate the huge scale of this bloody trade

Western nations have the power to stamp out the trade and save this iconic species

Parade protest case flawed, say lawyers

The case against Muslim protesters who branded soldiers murderers at a homecoming parade should never have been brought to court, their lawyers said today.

Album: Danny & the Champions of the World, Streets of Our Time (Loose)

Anyone remember Ronnie Lane's Slim Chance? This lot don't sound exactly like that but they do aspire to the same things, which is to reimagine rock as a footloose folk music big on soul, complete with poachers, swans, parakeets and bluebirds.

Stoke bag a point as keepers thwart poachers

Blackburn Rovers 0 Stoke City 0

Icap's margins squeezed by need to pay to keep key 'rain makers'

Icap, the money broker, yesterday admitted that its margins were being squeezed because of the need to pay up to keep hold of key moneymakers.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
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Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine