Sport

Roy Hodgson is confident that the midfielder Zoltan Gera will become West Brom's third new signing of the summer – and the manager is also stepping up his search for a goalkeeper.

Travolta 'fought to bring his boy back'

John Travolta said yesterday that he and his wife, Kelly Preston, were heartbroken at the loss of their chronically ill son, who collapsed and died while on holiday in the Bahamas.

Lee hails 'terrific' Gerrard as Torres returns in style

Preston North End 0 Liverpool 2

Benitez sends troubled captain into the fray

Rafael Benitez, the Liverpool manager, has reaffirmed his "trust" in captain Steven Gerrard and insists he never had any doubts about playing his key midfielder in tomorrow's FA Cup third-round tie at Preston.

Last-gasp Parkin gives McLeish blues

Preston North End 1 Birmingham City 0

We're freezing at night, say prisoners

Inmates in Victorian jail 'treated worse than dogs'

British travellers abandon their short breaks, but hang on to annual holiday

People are ditching city breaks but are setting aside cash for next year's annual holiday, a PricewaterhouseCoopers survey has shown.

Why The Jacksons went househunting in Devon

Earlier this year, the Jacksons decided to move... to Devon. It made for some surreal encounters – and one unmissable documentary. Meg Carter reports

The drive of our lives: 50 Years of Britain's motorways

They promised to speed us towards a modern age and rev up the post-war economy. So what happened? Fifty years after Britain's first motorways opened, Simon Usborne finds out how much we owe to our superhighways – and why the wheels had to come off

Ehiogu rolls back the years to pip persistent Preston

Sheffield United 1 Preston North End 0

Paperbacks: The Wild Trees, by Richard Preston

This book is a strange combination of the utterly absorbing and the almost unreadable. Preston thrillingly conveys his passion for the world's tallest trees.

Confidential files discovered in bin

Confidential police information about undercover officers and key witnesses in a massive drugs operation was found dumped in a bin.

Nigel Preston: Innovative fashion designer whose King's Road shop Maxfield Parrish grew into an international business

Jean Cocteau's maxim, that style is a simple way of saying complex things, sums up the effortless grace of Nigel Preston's skilful, subtle clothes design, most particularly in sheepskin, suede and leather, that inspired the fashion world for 30 years from the mid-Seventies. He was famous for his experimentation with decorative, painterly techniques, for his exotic colouring on leather, for his exquisite ornamentation and his patient eye for detail – his biannual collection was eagerly anticipated. Where Preston led, Hermès and Gucci followed. That he was not a household name says more about the vagaries and hype of the fashion industry than it does about his creative talents. The most unvain of men, he was a natural innovator.

Sir Dennis Weatherstone: Son of a London Transport clerk who became one of the greatest bankers of the late 20th century

Dennis Weatherstone was one of the greatest bankers of the last quarter of the 20th century. Little known to the public, rarely interviewed, he was very much a bankers' banker, deeply respected within the profession. Personally he was the very opposite of a major executive, described as "dapper, precise, soft-spoken. . . unfailingly polite, he moved like a cat. . . he was a man no one disliked". But, as anyone who came into contact with him knew, he "had a steely mind, especially in matters of risk".

Paperbacks: The Mesmerist, by Barbara Ewing

Mesmerism was all the rage in 19th-century London, and in her fourth novel Barbara Ewing imagines life for a female practitioner in this very male world.

Paperback: A Teardrop on the Cheek of Time, by Diana & Michael Preston

Although billed as a history of the Taj Mahal, the Prestons' richly patterned chintz of a book also delivers a romantic account of the Mughal empire as a whole. It treats the moment in the 1630s when the grief-stricken Shah Jahan built the marble tomb of his beloved wife, Mumtaz, as a pivot for the story of their love, their dynasty, and its spectacular rise and fall. Edward Lear thought it "simply silly" to describe the Taj, this "wonderfully lovely place". The Prestons – though sometimes prone to lush hyperbole – succeed far better than most.

Latest stories from i100
SPONSORED FEATURES
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent