Arts and Entertainment

One minute he was a humble punter trying to peek up Debbie Harry's skirt at a Hammersmith Odeon gig, the next he was the owner of the venue which was to steal the Odeon's crown. If Simon Parkes' autobiography – full of raucous tales and Geezer-speak – is ever made into a film, it will be fun trying to find an actor who can do him justice. When he wants to sound hard, he can sometimes come across like Ray Winstone. But would Ray Winstone ever have banked at Coutts?

Charlie Fink, frontman of Noah and the Whale

Music review: Noah And The Whale, Palace Theatre, London

You get a sense of frontman Charlie Fink’s ambition early on, when his band reveal their idea of a “stripped-back set” involves Tom Hobden’s violin soaring over a string quartet in the midst of a rollicking "Tonight’s The Kind Of Night".

Love bomb: Olivia Vinall and Adrian Lester as the newlyweds in Othello

Kate Bassett on Othello: Defeated by the green-eyed monster

Jealousy is the enemy in an impeccably cast tragedy. And a Swedish one-man-show is the West End's new best friend

'Reservoirs of disease': Private school pupils 'at much greater risk' of getting measles than those in state sector, says leading doctor John Ashton

Children at private schools face the greatest risk from the measles outbreak and could pose a health threat to the rest of the population, a leading doctor has warned.

Second suspect of Boston Marathon bombing Dzhokhar A Tsarnaev

Youtube, Amazon and the Russian answer to Facebook all offer a glimpse into the minds of the Boston bombing suspects

Postings suggest Islamic fervour, a desire for Chechen independence, and an interest in forgeries

Sport was a release from the classroom contract

Kevin Garside: It's awesome how grown men stay so attached to Wisden comforts

The Way I See It: Literary dimension is this touchstone’s legacy as much as facts and figures

Facebook's founder Mark Zuckerberg maintains that his website is not motivated primarily by money

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg poised to 'launch lobby group to campaign on immigration'

The formation of the group is expected to be announced in the next few weeks and is thought to have a goal of raising $50m to campaign for political reform on immigration and education issues.

The Education Secretary, Michael Gove

Michael Gove attacks top universities for not being honest about preferred A-levels

Criticism follows evidence that state school and ethnic minority pupils struggle to get onto the best courses

Homes painted in bright colours cover a hill in Jalousie, a cinder block shantytown in Petionville, Haiti. Workers this month began painting the concrete facades of buildings in Jalousie slum a rainbow of colours, inspired by the dazzling 'cities-in-the-skies' of well-known Haitian painter Prefete Duffaut, who died last year.

Beauty vs poverty: Haitian slums get psychedelic make-over in honour of artist Prefete Duffaut's 'cities in the sky'

One of Haiti's biggest shantytowns, a vast expanse of grim cinderblock homes on a mountainside in the nation's capital, is getting a psychedelic makeover that aims to be part art and part homage.

The News Matrix: Tuesday 26 March 2013

Suspect 'had never heard of Joss Stone'

Maria Llanos watches on as her daughter hugs a friend at the soon-to-close Lafayette School in Chicago

Yes, we can close schools: Rahm Emanuel’s cash crisis in Chicago

More than 10 per cent of city’s elementary facilities shut down by Obama’s former right-hand man

A Muslim 'Measure for Measure'? That's one updated version of Shakespeare I'd love to see

Plus: Absurd person singular in Mohsin Hamid's new novel and "feel-good" isn't good enough for Parks and Recreation

Grandparents are the unsung heroes of family life , says Ed Balls

Grandparents can’t solve everything

Either state-subsidised childcare frees up grandparents to work, like in Scandinavia, or the elderly are intensely involved in childcare, like in southern Europe.

George Traykov beat odds of one-in-438 million when he picked up a £160,873 EuroMillions prize this year to add to the £1 million sum he won in the Millionaire Raffle in September 2011.

The man who won big on the lottery... and then did it again

A man who won the lottery twice, scooping over £1.16 million in total, joked that he was not “that bothered” by the wins and wanted more.

Page 3 Profile: Aleqa Hammond, Greenland’s prospective new leader

Greenland’s first female prime minister?

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Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent