News Workers at mail-order company La Redoute protest in Lille against plans to sack 1,200 workers

3.2 million people are working so hard that they risked mental or physical breakdown, study finds

Firms 'not implementing flexi-work'

Employers are holding back attempts to increase productivity and staff well-being by failing to press ahead with flexible working arrangements, according to a new report.

Hamish McRae: Unemployment and GDP figures are still a riddle

Economic View: There is a real risk that the Bank of England will make some serious policy errors in the coming months

UK unemployment falls again as jobs market defies the slump

The labour market continued to defy gravity in the final three months of 2012, with employment rising and the jobless rate falling despite a decline in output over the same period, according to the Office for National Statistics (ONS).

Maurice Taylor, boss of the US firm Titan: 'The French workforce get paid high wages but only works three hours'

The Grizz mauls 'lazy' French workers over 'three-hour day'

US industrialist Maurice Taylor sparks storm by insulting staff, refuses to save ailing tyre factory

The days of journalists having big, boozy lunches are gone

Today's journalist is more likely to go jogging at lunchtime than to have a couple of bottles of red

Tesco's electronic armbands and Lady Gaga's hip: it’s the shirkers vs workers debate all over again

Let it be known: sticking it to the boss man is a full-time job requiring a genuine sense of vocation. Plus: what will we do without our supermarket snobberies?

Tesco accused of using electronic armbands to monitor its staff

Supermarket grades employees on efficiency and can reprimand them for breaks, says ex-worker

Amplats counts the cost of wildcat strikes

The world’s-biggest platinum producer, Anglo American Platinum (Amplats), lost 6.3 billion rand  (£44.9 million) last year after it was hit by two months of wildcat strikes and lost production.

Editorial: High-speed rail is not the best way to spend £32bn

It is easy to see the political appeal of super-fast rail. The prospect of passengers whisked from London to Birmingham in less than an hour, and on to Manchester in only slightly more, fits perfectly with the rhetoric of an ultra-modern, business-friendly Britain giving hi-tech rivals from France to Japan a run for their money. High Speed 2, linking London and the North, is also an ideal grand projet for a Government wrestling with a languishing economy. The scheme will create jobs, heal the North-South divide, and make the UK vastly more competitive, according to the Chancellor, Deputy Prime Minister and Prime Minister respectively.

Recovery in jobs gives a fillip before the news on growth

Number in work hits a record high but there are warnings of 'shaky foundations'

Offering Lloyds shares to the public may capture the spirit of the Eighties, but mutualisation is a better option

Lloyds Bank 'to axe 940 jobs and move 200 posts to India'

Lloyds Bank is to axe more than 940 jobs, bringing job loss announcements to 1,300 in the past few days, according to unions.

Small farms are critical in the fight against hunger

60 per cent of the rural population in Sub-Saharan Africa live in extreme poverty; helping small farms conserve their harvest better can make a huge difference

Thaw point: SAS offshoot Snowflake was a failure

Investment View: Why slow growth is not troubling equities

Cost-cutting, productivity improvements and restructuring cannot be repeated endlessly

Corelli at Christmas, Avison Ensemble, Rebecca Bottone, Kings Place, London

Soprano Rebecca Bottone is one of the most versatile performers on the operatic stage today. She gets her charisma from her father, the tenor Bonaventura Bottone, but her chameleon ability is all her own.

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Lennie James’s return as Morgan does not disappoint
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people
Arts and Entertainment
Another picture in the photo series (Rupi Kaur)
arts
Life and Style
Baroness Lane-Fox warned that large companies such as have become so powerful that governments and regulators are left behind
techTech giants have left governments and regulators behind
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Keith Fraser says we should give Isis sympathises free flights to join Isis (AFP)
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Life and Style
Google celebrates the 126th anniversary of the Eiffel Tower opening its doors to the public for the first time
techGoogle celebrates Paris's iconic landmark, which opened to the public 126 years ago today
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Cleopatra the tortoise suffers from a painful disease that causes her shell to disintegrate; her new prosthetic one has been custom-made for her using 3D printing technology
newsCleopatra had been suffering from 'pyramiding'
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people
Arts and Entertainment
Coachella and Lollapalooza festivals have both listed the selfie stick devices as “prohibited items”
music
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Nigel Owens was targeted on Twitter because of his sexuality during the Six Nations finale between England and France earlier this month
rugbyReferee Nigel Owens on coming out, and homophobic Twitter abuse
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
3.	Provence 6 nights B&B by train from £599pp
Prices correct as of 12 March 2015
No postcode? No vote

Floating voters

How living on a houseboat meant I didn't officially 'exist'
Louis Theroux's affable Englishman routine begins to wear thin

By Reason of Insanity

Louis Theroux's affable Englishman routine begins to wear thin
Power dressing is back – but no shoulderpads!

Power dressing is back

But banish all thoughts of Eighties shoulderpads
Spanish stone-age cave paintings 'under threat' after being re-opened to the public

Spanish stone-age cave paintings in Altamira 'under threat'

Caves were re-opened to the public
'I was the bookies’ favourite to be first to leave the Cabinet'

Vince Cable interview

'I was the bookies’ favourite to be first to leave the Cabinet'
Election 2015: How many of the Government's coalition agreement promises have been kept?

Promises, promises

But how many coalition agreement pledges have been kept?
The Gaza fisherman who built his own reef - and was shot dead there by an Israeli gunboat

The death of a Gaza fisherman

He built his own reef, and was fatally shot there by an Israeli gunboat
Saudi Arabia's airstrikes in Yemen are fuelling the Gulf's fire

Saudi airstrikes are fuelling the Gulf's fire

Arab intervention in Yemen risks entrenching Sunni-Shia divide and handing a victory to Isis, says Patrick Cockburn
Zayn Malik's departure from One Direction shows the perils of fame in the age of social media

The only direction Zayn could go

We wince at the anguish of One Direction's fans, but Malik's departure shows the perils of fame in the age of social media
Young Magician of the Year 2015: Meet the schoolgirl from Newcastle who has her heart set on being the competition's first female winner

Spells like teen spirit

A 16-year-old from Newcastle has set her heart on being the first female to win Young Magician of the Year. Jonathan Owen meets her
Jonathan Anderson: If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

British designer Jonathan Anderson is putting his stamp on venerable house Loewe
Number plates scheme could provide a licence to offend in the land of the free

Licence to offend in the land of the free

Cash-strapped states have hit on a way of making money out of drivers that may be in collision with the First Amendment, says Rupert Cornwell
From farm to fork: Meet the Cornish fishermen, vegetable-growers and butchers causing a stir in London's top restaurants

From farm to fork in Cornwall

One man is bringing together Cornwall's most accomplished growers, fishermen and butchers with London's best chefs to put the finest, freshest produce on the plates of some of the country’s best restaurants
Robert Parker interview: The world's top wine critic on tasting 10,000 bottles a year, absurd drinking notes and New World wannabes

Robert Parker interview

The world's top wine critic on tasting 10,000 bottles a year, absurd drinking notes and New World wannabes
Don't believe the stereotype - or should you?

Don't believe the stereotype - or should you?

We exaggerate regional traits and turn them into jokes - and those on the receiving end are in on it too, says DJ Taylor