News Workers at mail-order company La Redoute protest in Lille against plans to sack 1,200 workers

3.2 million people are working so hard that they risked mental or physical breakdown, study finds

Ed Miliband has backed the introduction of the Living Wage, along with London Mayor Boris Johnson

Living wage for all workers would boost taxes and GDP

Five million people, including three million women, are paid below the living wage

Starbucks is among companies criticised over their tax bill

Large companies paying less tax despite big increase in profits

Britain's biggest companies pay less tax now than they did 12 years ago, it was revealed today, while their profitability over that period has jumped.

PZ Cussons is undaunted by Nigerian storms

Violent religious clashes, an eight-day national strike and flooding failed to dent PZ Cussons' profits during the first half of the year.

Nick Boles wants to build on the greenbelt, but it's too soon for us to admire man-made landscapes

Plus: From Russia with repetition and one actor who isn't showing his age

Postal Service lettercarrier Raymond Hou delivers mail along his route

US postal service posts annual loss of $15.9bn

The US Postal Service on Thursday reported a record annual loss of $15.9 billion in the past fiscal year, prompting renewed calls for Congress to pass legislation to help.

Writers of The Thick of It have been credited with creating the Oxford Dictionaries UK Word of the Year

Omnishambles: the word that sums up the year - official

Writers of The Thick of It have been credited with creating the Oxford Dictionaries UK Word of the Year. ‘Omnishambles’ is defined as “a situation that has been comprehensively mismanaged, characterised by a string of blunders and miscalculations”.

Engage with your workers, chiefs urge fellow bosses

A coalition of bosses from Britain's biggest companies, including Sainsbury's, Marks & Spencer and Lloyds Banking Group, have called on industry to better engage their workers.

IoS letters, emails & online postings (11 November 2012)

It is pleasing to see the Labour Party inching towards a stronger policy on the living wage (Ed Miliband exclusive interview, 4 November), but disappointing that the movement is so small. If this is a "central part" of Mr Miliband's vision, then enforcing a living wage clause in Whitehall contracts and "naming and shaming" big companies are rather small steps.

A new survey says half of all American smokers have tried to quit

More than half US smokers have tried to quit

More than half of American smokers tried to quit the habit as the daily use of cigarettes fell, US health officials say.

Revealed: Climate change led to decline of Maya civilisation

One of the world’s great civilisations was forced into terminal decline by successive dry periods culminating in a prolonged drought, according to a study that throws fresh light on the mysterious disappearance of the Maya in Central America around 1,100AD.

Editorial: How to improve life for the 'squeezed middle'

There is a practical aspect, but it is a matter of basic social justice, too

The 'Hangover Patch' being sold by Firebox.com

Hungover? There's a 'cure' for that as detox patch goes on sale

Christmas revellers have been offered a helping hand with an American hangover “cure” that claims to be second only to having an “intravenous stuck in your arm”.

Ed Miliband and Boris Johnson support the Living Wage. Will Whitehall and big firms dare to follow?

A Living Wage encourages people into work, reduces the burden on the taxpayer, and is an effective form of redistribution without recourse to the State. What's not to like?

'Back-office' businesses more upbeat

Fresh signs of optimism for the economy emerged from expectations of a strong quarter from "back-office" support service firms that act as a barometer for corporate Britain.

Anthony Hilton's Week: How being more flexible can mean you’re just another brick in the wall

One of the largest employers and subcontractors of bricklayers said privately the other day that the average pay of one of his skilled craftsmen today was back at the level of 15 years ago. This of course reflects the weak state of the housebuilding market, though it is less weak than it appears at first sight because the detached three-bedroom houses for the middle-aged market, which are the main thing being built at the moment, use a lot more bricks than the high-rise young people’s flats so popular five years ago.

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In a world of Saudi bullying, right-wing Israeli ministers and the twilight of Obama, Iran is looking like a possible policeman of the Gulf

Iran is shifting from pariah to possible future policeman of the Gulf

Robert Fisk on our crisis with Iran
The young are the new poor: A third of young people pushed into poverty

The young are the new poor

Sharp increase in the number of under-25s living in poverty
Greens on the march: ‘We could be on the edge of something very big’

Greens on the march

‘We could be on the edge of something very big’
Revealed: the case against Bill Cosby - through the stories of his accusers

Revealed: the case against Bill Cosby

Through the stories of his accusers
Why are words like 'mongol' and 'mongoloid' still bandied about as insults?

The Meaning of Mongol

Why are the words 'mongol' and 'mongoloid' still bandied about as insults?
Mau Mau uprising: Kenyans still waiting for justice join class action over Britain's role in the emergency

Kenyans still waiting for justice over Mau Mau uprising

Thousands join class action over Britain's role in the emergency
Isis in Iraq: The trauma of the last six months has overwhelmed the remaining Christians in the country

The last Christians in Iraq

After 2,000 years, a community will try anything – including pretending to convert to Islam – to avoid losing everything, says Patrick Cockburn
Black Friday: Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Britain braced for Black Friday
Bill Cosby's persona goes from America's dad to date-rape drugs

From America's dad to date-rape drugs

Stories of Bill Cosby's alleged sexual assaults may have circulated widely in Hollywood, but they came as a shock to fans, says Rupert Cornwell
Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

As fans flock to see England women's Wembley debut against Germany, the TV presenter on an exciting 'sea change'
Oh come, all ye multi-faithful: The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?

Oh come, all ye multi-faithful

The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?
Dr Charles Heatley: The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

Dr Charles Heatley on joining the NHS volunteers' team bound for Sierra Leone
Flogging vlogging: First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books

Flogging vlogging

First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books
Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show: US channels wage comedy star wars

Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show

US channels wage comedy star wars
When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine? When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible

When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine?

When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible