Osama Bin Laden movie to be filmed in India

There were disagreements about the details – one said Rajasthan, another said Punjab – but the Indian media was in agreement yesterday that movie director Kathryn Bigelow is poised to film parts of her new movie about Osama Bin Laden here, rather than in Pakistan.

Hitmen are after me, says Rushdie as he pulls out of Indian festival

From modest beginnings it has become one of the biggest literary festivals on earth. This year the roster of big names talking about their work includes Michael Ondaatje, Tom Stoppard, Richard Dawkins, Annie Proulx, Hari Kunzru, Shashi Tharoor and William Dalrymple, the festival's co-director.

Deals of the week

Instant Andalucia:

Fly out next Friday to the Spanish city of Seville, which at this time of year offers warm weather along side its stunning Moorish architecture. Expedia will put you up for three nights at the luxurious Vincci La Rabida Hotel for £399 per person, room only. The deal includes Iberia flights from Heathrow on 4 November. expedia.co.uk

Fateh Singh Rathore: Conservationist known as ‘The Tiger Man of

Fateh Singh Rathore dedicated his life to the conservation of tigers. Not for nothing was he called the Tiger Man of India, dark, rugged and fearless with his white handlebar moustache, eyes beaming underneath his trademark olive-coloured stetson and tiger-print silk cravat. The big cats in Ranthambore – a habitat for tigers he had developed with consummate skill, and guarded possessively – recognised him. And he knew them, by their stripes, their pugmarks, habits and behaviours. He called them "my tigers" and named them after Mughal rulers and Hindu deities. When the mood seized him he would talk to them; and they seemed to understand him. He had an uncanny ability to predict the predators' whereabouts in Ranthambore, claiming that he could identify his tigers even if they were mixed with, as, he said, "10,000 others".

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24-hour room service: Raas, Jodhpur, India

Exploring the province of Rajasthan in northwest India is one big adventure. But part of the joy of travel is mixing the raw, dusty desert experience with a touch of luxury. Which is why I was heading for Jodhpur's newest boutique hotel, Raas. The manner of the approach was unusual: in the back of one of the hotel's two customised sky-blue tuk-tuks, threading through the cobweb of tiny streets that form the city's rosy pink-tinged sandstone old quarter. The tuk-tuk's colour was a nod to Jodhpur's other title: the Blue City (so called due to the proliferation of houses painted this hue, which historically denoted the residences of its high-caste Brahmin population).