News

Rescuers searching for a missing kayaker after an upturned boat and oars were found floating in the Thames have recovered a body.

Thirty-nine steps to an unlikely theatrical triumph

Play that began life in draughty Yorkshire church halls with four actors, a stuffed dog and a very large sheet, takes Broadway by storm

Dropping your child off at school? That'll be £75... just to park

Borough sparks fury and accusations of targeting mums and children with its plans to charge cars at school gates

Paul Raymond: Self-styled 'King of Soho' who built a successful business empire from property and pornography

The self-styled "King of Soho", Paul Raymond was a self-made millionaire and pioneering sex mogul whose x-rated career spanned seven decades from coy post-war striptease to the hardcore world of the internet. He brought pornography out from under the counters of tatty corner shops and onto the top shelves of WH Smith, giving bare breasts a sophisticated sheen and earning himself a £650m fortune along the way.

You Ask The Questions: Harriet Harman MP

Deputy Leader of the Labour Party answers your quesions, including whether multiculturalism has failed and if she, as a feminist, is proud of Mrs Thatcher

Sir John Hill: Scientist-administrator at the heart of the nuclear establishment

John Hill was the dominant figure in the British nuclear industry through the 1970s. His career coincided with the era when Britain, at great cost, tried and ultimately failed to create its own home-grown nuclear power technology. Lauded and vilified in equal measure, Hill came to embody that period.

You Write The Reviews: The Tempest, Arts Theatre, London

Tara Arts's production of The Tempest gives us Shakespeare's late masterpiece in an hour and 45 minutes, with no interval, using six actors and the simplest of sets and stage effects.

Giuliani's presidential bid is undermined by leak

Even before he has formally entered the presidential race, the former New York mayor Rudolph Giuliani has been embarrassed by the leak of a voluminous campaign document, listing possibly "insurmountable" obstacles, including his marital history and liberal social views, that could torpedo his candidacy.

Racing: The horse that won America

The cruel fate of rising star Barbaro highlights the often-brutal conditions of a sport in which horses have increasingly short-lived careers before being retired - or put down

Out of the local loop: BT dials 'T' for trouble

Ben Verwaayen needs some quick successes if the telecoms giant is to overcome its mounting challenges

Letter: Kinds of truth

Sir: Tony Blair says it is a "fact" that the IRA carried out the Northern Bank robbery. He was also certain that it was "beyond doubt" that Saddam had WMD stockpiles ready to fire at British targets within 45 minutes. Does the PM know something we don't, or is he just stating, in good faith, what he believes to be true at this moment in time?

Letter: How to fight burglars

Sir: As a martial arts instructor, I fully endorse the right to use weapons in defence of the home ("Home owners can kill burglars in self- defence", 2 February). However, the decision to take up a weapon should not be based on legal permission but on a considered analysis of the practicalities of the situation. In this analysis the type of weapon is crucial.

Letter: Hero of Waterloo

Sir: Churchill's funeral did not end with "a homely chuffer pulling out of Paddington" ("Churchill the hero", 29 January), even though Paddington is the natural station for travel to Bladon, where Churchill is buried. The cortege crossed the river from St Paul's to Waterloo and travelled the long way, via Richmond and Ascot, joining the western line at Reading. Why was this? The likely sounding legend is that Churchill had decided upon Paddington if de Gaulle predeceased him, but if he predeceased de Gaulle the funeral train was to leave from Waterloo.

Hockey: Teddington seek goals from old boy Conway

NICK CONWAY, assistant coach to the touring United States women's squad who are playing a three-match Test series against Great Britain, takes time off this afternoon to appear for his old team Teddington in their Premier League local derby at home to Surbiton.

Hockey: Southgate hit by injuries

WHO WOULD have thought it? A relegation battle between Teddington and Southgate. The first in 11 seasons of National League hockey takes place at Trent Park, north London, tomorrow with the odds in favour of Teddington, who have taken seven points out of the last 12. Southgate, without a point from their last four games, have plummeted into the basement alongside Bournville and Beeston on seven points, two behind Teddington.

People's Laureate puts poetry on TUC agenda

THE POET Laureate, Andrew Motion, has craftily redefined the nature of his post by writing a poem for the TUC.
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
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Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

Army general planning to come out
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project