Arts and Entertainment Sandra Bullock and George Clooney in Alfonso Cuaron's Gravity

Clooney and Bullock's real bodies were not shown in space, Corbould reveals

Not Fade Away: Rolling Stones photos found after 40 years

Previously unpublished images from a 1970 studio photo shoot by Peter Webb are going on show after being lost in an attic for 40 years. Matilda Battersby talks to the photographer

Cowboys & Aliens: Unlikely battles

When Frankenstein met Wolf Man in 1948, they spawned a line of bastard movies that continues to today's monster mash-ups. Kaleem Aftab on the new wave of cross-genre films

Idris Elba: 'I'm so hot right now'

The Wire made him everyone’s favourite baddie, Luther, everyone’s favourite cop. Tim Walker meets the master of modern crime drama

Screen Talk: Paper trail

Long-gestating plans to turn the 1995 Pete Dexter novel The Paperboy into a big-screen thriller picked up speed during this year's Festival de Cannes.

The Colosseum, By Keith Hopkins & Mary Beard

Though it is "the most famous, and instantly recognisable, monument to have survived from the classical world", the authors of this excellent history concede that the Colosseum can be disappointing. "Any visitor will almost certainly be amazed by the overpowering bulk of the outside walls," but inside "they are confronted by...a jumble of dilapidated stone and rubble."

Geoffrey Macnab: Are you ready for Ridley Scott, the 'brand'?

The British and the Americans have different attitudes toward the idea of sequels and prequels. If a film is seen as a classic, the Brits tend to leave it alone for fear of tarnishing the original's reputation. For the Americans, the key question is whether there is money still on the table.

Blade Runner: Time to replicate the replicants...

As Hollywood banks on sequels, Warner is planning to make Blade Runner 2. Tom Peck gets a glimpse of the future

Key bidders emerge as sale of The Mill gathers pace

Bidders are lining up for The Mill, the TV production company behind special effects in Doctor Who and Nike's World Cup adverts with its owners hoping to agree a deal before the end of April.

Sam Rockwell: A wild card's world of pain

Sam Rockwell has a reputation as a live wire, an American firecracker. The 42-year-old actor has played a handful of major leads – most notoriously, the possibly delusional game-show host Chuck Barris in George Clooney's wildly eccentric Confessions of a Dangerous Mind. And in 2009 he scored a personal best, playing opposite himself as an existentially troubled spaceman in Duncan Jones's acclaimed Moon. But Rockwell is still often found as a second stringer – amid the support casts of The Assassination of Jesse James...and Frost/Nixon, or playing a brattish villain in Iron Man 2, even upstaging Robert Downey Jr with sheer showboat obnoxiousness.

Charles Nevin: The pastimes you need in an emergency

Start the week

Fiona Banner: The Naked Ear, Frith Street Gallery, London

Fiona Banner's current installation in the Duveen Galleries at Tate Britain, Harrier and Jaguar (2010), sees two fighter planes dominating one of the grand spaces of the museum. It's an uncomfortable triple sublime: force x power x impressive aesthetics, but oddly underwhelming as art. Elsewhere in London, at Frith Street Gallery, is a literal echo of that installation. An enormous bell greets you at the gallery, hung low from supports in the ceiling. The sculpture is ominously named Tornado (2010) has been cast from the melted-down fuselage of a Tornado jet fighter – a deadly efficient machine of war. For whom does this bell toll? The idea of a deep, sonorous bell ring rings with signification: the passing of time, births, deaths and marriages. A large single bell like this, however, given its name and its history, is more likely to bring to mind mourning, warning and doom. The death-knell. How many times did this particular plane bring about death and destruction? Nearby is a stack of every copy of Jane's All the World's Aircraft, from 1909-2010. A heap of language that describes only destructive capability and armature, freed from the bloodshed, the conflict and the history of the wars for which such impressive machines are made.

Director’s Cuts - If it isn’t broke, why bother to fix it?

As big-name film-makers offer more and more Director’s Cuts, Leigh Singer asks if the results justify the obsessive tinkering.

Ridley Scott returns to sci-fi for BBC

Sir Ridley Scott is planning a return to science-fiction by producing a BBC mini-series almost 30 years after he directed Blade Runner.

Why can't we have arthouse films on TV?

The uninspiring choice of movies on television leaves Ben Walsh yearning for the indie treats of the Eighties

DVD: Robin Hood

Ridley Scott’s version of ye olde legend has the hefty battle scenes and earthy period colour you’d expect, but Scott seems to think that Robin (Russell Crowe) was a real historical figure, and so he explores in baffling detail the political chicanery which led to one of King Richard’s archers becoming an outlaw, and gives us precious little swashbuckling.

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The Banksy image in Folkestone before it was vandalised
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Life and Style
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Sales of the tablet are set to fall again, say analysts

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Gotham is coming to UK shores this autumn
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Bloom Time: Mira Sorvino
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First woman: Valentina Tereshkova
peopleNASA guinea pig Kate Greene thinks it might fly
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Brian Harvey turned up at Downing Street today demanding to speak to the Prime Minister
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Met Police confirm there was a 'minor disturbance' and that no-one was arrested

Arts and Entertainment
George Lucas poses with a group of Star Wars-inspired Disney characters at Disney's Hollywood Studios in 2010
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George Lucas criticises the major Hollywood film studios

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Chris Grayling, Justice Secretary: 'There are pressures which we are facing but there is not a crisis'
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Does Chris Grayling realise what a vague concept he is dealing with?

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Prices correct as of 17 October 2014
Oscar Pistorius sentencing: The athlete's wealth and notoriety have provoked a long overdue debate on South African prisons

'They poured water on, then electrified me...'

If Oscar Pistorius is sent to jail, his experience will not be that of other inmates
James Wharton: The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

Life after the Army has brought new battles for the LGBT activist James Wharton
Ebola in the US: Panic over the virus threatens to infect President Obama's midterms

Panic over Ebola threatens to infect the midterms

Just one person has died, yet November's elections may be affected by what Republicans call 'Obama's Katrina', says Rupert Cornwell
Premier League coaches join the RSC to swap the tricks of their trades

Darling, you were fabulous! But offside...

Premier League coaches are joining the RSC to learn acting skills, and in turn they will teach its actors to play football. Nick Clark finds out why
How to dress with authority: Kirsty Wark and Camila Batmanghelidjh discuss the changing role of fashion in women's workwear

How to dress with authority

Kirsty Wark and Camila Batmanghelidjh discuss the changing role of fashion in women's workwear
New book on Joy Division's Ian Curtis sheds new light on the life of the late singer

New book on Ian Curtis sheds fresh light on the life of the late singer

'Joy Division were making art... Ian was for real' says author Jon Savage
Sean Harris: A rare interview with British acting's secret weapon

Sean Harris: A rare interview with British acting's secret weapon

The Bafta-winner talks Hollywood, being branded a psycho, and how Barbra Streisand is his true inspiration
Tim Minchin, interview: The musician, comedian and world's favourite ginger is on scorching form

Tim Minchin interview

For a no-holds-barred comedian who is scathing about woolly thinking and oppressive religiosity, he is surprisingly gentle in person
Boris Johnson's boozing won't win the puritan vote

Boris's boozing won't win the puritan vote

Many of us Brits still disapprove of conspicuous consumption – it's the way we were raised, says DJ Taylor
Ash frontman Tim Wheeler reveals how he came to terms with his father's dementia

Tim Wheeler: Alzheimer's, memories and my dad

Wheeler's dad suffered from Alzheimer's for three years. When he died, there was only one way the Ash frontman knew how to respond: with a heartfelt solo album
Hugh Bonneville & Peter James: 'Peter loves his classic cars; I've always pootled along fine with a Mini Metro. I think I lack his panache'

How We Met: Hugh Bonneville & Peter James

'Peter loves his classic cars; I've always pootled along fine with a Mini Metro. I think I lack his panache'
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef's heavenly crab dishes don't need hours of preparation

Bill Granger's heavenly crab recipes

Scared off by the strain of shelling a crab? Let a fishmonger do the hard work so you can focus on getting the flavours right
Radamel Falcao: How faith and love drive the Colombian to glory

Radamel Falcao: How faith and love drive the Colombian to glory

After a remarkable conversion from reckless defender to prolific striker, Monaco's ace says he wants to make his loan deal at Old Trafford permanent
Terry Venables: Premier League managers must not be allowed to dictate who plays and who does not play for England

Terry Venables column

Premier League managers must not be allowed to dictate who plays and who does not play for England
The Inside Word: Brendan Rodgers looks to the future while Roy Hodgson is ghost of seasons past

Michael Calvin's Inside Word

Brendan Rodgers looks to the future while Roy Hodgson is ghost of seasons past