Arts and Entertainment '1984' performed at the West Yorkshire Playhouse

It seems a suitably Orwellian reward to the extraordinary success story that is Nottingham Playhouse’s co-production of 1984.  On the day that tickets for its keenly-awaited opening at the Almeida in London went on sale, the company was told - without warning - it faced losing all of its funding from Nottinghamshire County Council.

Matt Smith named as new Doctor Who

Matt Smith was today named as the new Doctor Who, the BBC said, becoming the 11th Time Lord since the programme first aired in 1963.

Who's who in Pantoland this year

Heard the one about Hollywood stars entertaining children the length and breadth of Britain? Thankfully it's true, and the season of festive silliness is now upon us. Larry Ryan spotlights the big names

Reg Varney: Comic actor and entertainer who found fame in 'On The Buses'

The bus driver Stan Butler in On The Buses was the former variety artist Reg Varney's most famous screen role. The cheery-faced, 5ft 5in star, who steered the No 11 to the cemetery gates and through 73 television programmes, made Stan one of the small screen's most popular comedy characters at the turn of the 1970s.

Blade Runners, Deer Hunters and Blowing the Bloody Doors Off, By Michael Deeley with Matthew Field

This hilarious memoir takes us behind the scenes of some classics of modern cinema

Darling plays to left with attack on bonuses

Unions welcome an apparent shift away from Conservative thinking. Chancellor calls for tighter regulation to protect banking system

Armstrong to quit Robin Hood

Jonas Armstrong, the actor who plays Robin Hood in the BBC remake of the tale, is to quit the show at the end of the third series.

Robin Hood and the wrong sort of leaves

For a man who spent his life in Sherwood Forest robbing the rich and giving to the poor, it is a strange excuse: Robin Hood's latest Hollywood outing has been postponed because of a failure to grasp a fundamental of botany.

Massive under-reporting of fish catches leads to declining stocks

The total amount of fish being caught in the world is significantly under-reported because official statistics do not take into account the substantial catches made by some of the poorest nations that rely on fishing as a food staple, a study has found.

Equestrianism: Whitaker still thriving despite Olympic heartbreak

Ellen Whitaker proved her competitive spirit was sharpened rather than blunted by disappointment when she gained her second international victory since being omitted from the Olympic team. In the process of winning the Stoner Jeweller's Vase on the second day of the British Jumping Derby Meeting, she had the satisfaction of defeating Ben Maher and Tim Stockdale (second and fourth respectively) who were both named for the Olympic team on Wednesday.

Cut! Actors' strike threatens to bring Hollywood to a standstill

To have one trade union paralyse Hollywood was strange; two doing it in quick succession feels like carelessness. A threatened walkout by actors, which could begin as early as next week, is throwing major film and television studios into chaos.

My Life In Travel: Keith Allen, actor and comedian

'I like to find live music – it tells you about the pulse of a place'

Ollie Johnston: Last of Disney's 'Nine Old Men'

Ollie Johnston was the last surviving member of the legendary group of animators dubbed "the Nine Old Men" who worked at the pioneering Walt Disney studios from the mid-Thirties. He graduated from animating Mickey Mouse shorts to work on such classics as Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Pinocchio, Bambi, Cinderella and The Jungle Book.

David Watkin: Oscar-winning cinematographer

An Oscar winner for his ravishing photography of Sidney Pollack's film Out of Africa (1985), David Watkin was one of the finest and most innovative of British cinematographers, his work ranging from the unconventional pyrotechnics of Richard Lester's offbeat comedies to the magisterial sweep of Hugh Hudson's Chariots of Fire (1981) and the surreal flavour of life on an army camp in Mike Nichols's Catch-22 (1970).

Konnie Huq: Land ahoy! Huq ready to jump 'Blue Peter' ship

After 10 years on the high seas presenting the BBC's flagship children's show, Konnie Huq tells Sophie Morris that she's looking forward to a life free of scrutiny and sticky-back plastic

The Third Leader: Here we go...

So, at last, after, metatarsal, untried youth, Sven flips, daring to dream, appeals for good humour and no harking back, 1,966 interviews with George Cohen and the revelation that an average car carrying two England flags travelling at 70mph burns an extra litre of fuel per hour: it's all kicking off!

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The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003