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Tyler Doohan went back inside the bedroom of a burning trailer to try and save his disabled grandfather

Enjoy autumn in the garden of England

British breaks: Kent

Walker gives his nervous team-mates a batting lesson

Middlesex 356 & 47-3 Essex 345

Bullying 'rife' at young offenders institution

Inmates at a young offenders' institution hid in their cells and refused to come out, even to eat, because they feared for their safety, an official report has found.

Philip Hensher: Forget about a 'cure' for homosexuality

It grows increasingly hard to tell the difference between bishops of the Church of England and Paris Hilton. Bishops used to be thoughtful, retiring people, happy to spread the word of God through bring-and-buy sales, the Mothers' Union and the occasional sermon. Nowadays, some of them have been bitten by the bug of publicity, and they just can't seem to shut up.

Condemnation for bishop who called for gay people to 'repent'

Michael Nazir-Ali accused of pandering to hate and homophobia

Lionel Lewis: Compassionate and energetic social service administrator and writer

Lionel Lewis was full of ideas. As the Master of Workhouses, where he was responsible for everything from general maintenance to nursing services, he needed to be. His last appointment was superintendent of Bensted House, Faversham, a post he held jointly with his wife for 25 years, and where he also had oversight of the donkey engine which pumped the water supply. When the former workhouse was demolished and a council estate built on the site, Swale borough council named it Lewis Close and preserved the weeping beech tree which had been planted when he removed all the institution's high walls and had flower beds and gardens laid out for the old people in the house and hospital. "I am sad when I remember the sincere caring for patients and residents by the staff in now demolished workhouses, the easy interchange of inmate and patients under the same roof," he wrote in his autobiography, A Requiem for Workhouses (2006).

Jean Rhys: Prostitution, alcoholism and the mad woman in the attic

Alcoholic, often destitute, and abandoned by a series of men, Jean Rhys led a tortured life, according to a new biography. Yet it was these very hardships, says Lesley McDowell, which made her the writer she was

Medway

Secondary School Tables 2009

Page Turner: The princess and the burper: a fairy tale

Great excitement! The Secret of Moonacre, a film adapted from Elizabeth Goudge's 1946 children's classic, The Little White Horse, is out on 6 February, but I got invited to an early screening. A first glimpse at the cast list whetted my appetite: Tim Curry – what a splendid choice to play the 13-year-old heroine's gruff but adorable elderly uncle, Sir Benjamin Merryweather! So it was a shock to see the brooding Ioan Gruffudd barking: "Welcome to Moonacre Manor!" Uh-oh. Moonacre's in picturesque ruins, and he thinks he's Mr Rochester.

What did the aide say about the Bishop ...?

His outspoken views on gay rights and the integration of Muslim communities have attracted vitriolic criticism and even earned him death threats from outside the Church of England.

You write the reviews:<br/> Man on wire (James Marsh, 12A, 94mins) Nationwide

Since the collapse of the World Trade Center in 2001, two powerful documentaries have looked at the Twin Towers through the eyes of a man faced with death. The first, Henry Singer's The Falling Man, tries to piece together the final moments of an unknown 9/11 "jumper" who was made immortal in a photograph taken by Richard Drew. He was a reluctant victim for whom death came looking. The second film is Man on Wire, the story of the marvellous high-wire walker Philippe Petit, and his nonchalance in the face of death.

Bouncy castle accident 'not couple's fault'

A couple found liable for an accident on a bouncy castle that left a boy brain-damaged have won their appeal against the ruling.

Book Of A Lifetime: Wide Sargasso Sea, by Jean Rhys

Wide Sargasso Sea is not just a great novel, it is many brilliant books in one. Multi-layered and complex, Jean Rhys's prelude to Jane Eyre vividly illustrates how accounts and understanding differ, and creates a sense of the characters' past being inescapable.

Sarah Sands: Heathcliff is at his best when the wind is howling

It has been my persistent belief, backed by empirical evidence, that Gordon Brown is responsible for the wild, wet weather we have been experiencing since he came to power. Last week, he more or less admitted that he is the storm incarnate; for he is Heathcliff.

Frank Berger: Inventor of the first tranquilliser

Frank Berger spawned a billion-pound industry when he invented meprobamate, the first tranquilliser. Until then the nearest drugs were barbiturates, which sedated rather than calmed and were often used by suicides. There was a huge need for a sedating drug that remained safe in overdose, and for a decade mebrobamate filled that gap. It was sold in the UK as Equanil and – combined with a painkiller – as Equagesic.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Greece says 'No': A night of huge celebrations in Athens as voters decisively back Tsipras and his anti-austerity stance in historic referendum

Greece referendum

Greeks say 'No' to austerity and plunge Europe into crisis
Ten years after the 7/7 terror attacks, is Britain an altered state?

7/7 bombings anniversary

Ten years after the terror attacks, is Britain an altered state?
Beautiful evening dresses are some of the loveliest Donatella has created

Versace haute couture review

Beautiful evening dresses are some of the loveliest Donatella has ever created
No hope and no jobs, so Gaza's young risk their lives, climb the fence and run for it

No hope and no jobs in Gaza

So the young risk their lives and run for it
Fashion apps: Retailers roll together shopping and social networking for mobile customers

Fashion apps

Retailers roll together shopping and social networking for mobile customers
The Greek referendum exposes a gaping hole at the heart of the European Union – its distinct lack of any genuine popular legitimacy

Gaping hole at the heart of the European Union

Treatment of Greece has shown up a lack of genuine legitimacy
Number of young homeless in Britain 'more than three times the official figures'

'Everything changed when I went to the hostel'

Number of young homeless people in Britain is 'more than three times the official figures'
Compton Cricket Club

Compton Cricket Club

Portraits of LA cricketers from notorious suburb to be displayed in London
London now the global money-laundering centre for the drug trade, says crime expert

Wlecome to London, drug money-laundering centre for the world

'Mexico is its heart and London is its head'
The Buddhist temple minutes from Centre Court that helps a winner keep on winning

The Buddhist temple minutes from Centre Court

It helps a winner keep on winning
Is this the future of flying: battery-powered planes made of plastic, and without flight decks?

Is this the future of flying?

Battery-powered planes made of plastic, and without flight decks
Isis are barbarians – but the Caliphate is a dream at the heart of all Muslim traditions

Isis are barbarians

but the Caliphate is an ancient Muslim ideal
The Brink's-Mat curse strikes again: three tons of stolen gold that brought only grief

Curse of Brink's Mat strikes again

Death of John 'Goldfinger' Palmer the latest killing related to 1983 heist
Greece debt crisis: 'The ministers talk to us about miracles' – why Greeks are cynical ahead of the bailout referendum

'The ministers talk to us about miracles'

Why Greeks are cynical ahead of the bailout referendum
Call of the wild: How science is learning to decode the way animals communicate

Call of the wild

How science is learning to decode the way animals communicate