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In the often unintelligible acronym- and jargon-crazed world of Work and Pensions Questions, no-one could accuse the right-wing Tory Philip Davies of not telling it like he thinks it is.

Album: Chipmunk, Transition (Jive)

The title belies the contents of Chipmunk's follow-up to his debut album: it's not so much a case of transition as stasis, with the young rapper apparently struggling to move beyond the formulaic aspirational blather and paranoid complaints about haters and gold-diggers.

Verbraak to stand in as Hugo Boss skipper

Wouter Verbraak, an experienced ocean racer from The Netherlands, is to substitute Alex Thomson as skipper of Hugo Boss for the start the Barcelona two-handed non-stop round the world race.

Sydney to Hobart protests dismissed

An international jury in Tasmania dismissed a protest by the organising race committee against Bob Oatley’s 100-foot Wild Oats and confirmed its fifth line honours win in six years of the Rolex Sydney to Hobart race. A similar protest against Britain’s 72-foot Rán, owned by Skype founder Niklas Zennstrom and skippered by Tim Powell, about a failure to meet a radio reporting schedule, was also dismissed.

Calm start to Sydney to Hobart Race

First night frights were kept to a minimum in the Rolex Sydney to Hobart Race.

China: Shopping mad in Shanghai

A frenzy of buying and selling makes this the most dynamic city in China.

The Rolex that became Hillary's timebomb

The proposed sale of the mountaineer's watch is stoking a bitter feud between his children and second wife

The Hacker: Media challenge is a write-off for Corrigans as the Yanks press home their advantage

Three days before the sleek stars of the European and United States golf teams began their Ryder Cup battle at Celtic Manor, the haggard and bedraggled members of the media – who could be persuaded from their beds at around 5am on Tuesday morning – gathered to contest the Wryter Cup.

Irish sweep to victory in the Rolex Commodores’ Cup

In a gun to tape display of unstoppable power, the Irish swept to victory in the Rolex Commodores’ Cup, followed by Hong Kong and two French teams, leaving the best of the home sides in a humiliating fifth.

John Walsh: Never in the field of interplanetary conflict

At last it's out in the open. Winston Churchill was so bothered by reports of UFOs interfering with RAF aircraft during the Second World War, he ordered that the encounter should be kept quiet for 50 years. Admittedly the news isn't exactly well documented.– a chap wrote to the Ministry of Defence in 1999, claiming that his grandfather had overheard Churchill talking to Eisenhower about the spooky event – but it's a fascinating vignette of the great man confronted with something he has no idea how to deal with.

Five jailed for smash-and-grab raid on jewellers

Five men who pulled off a £330,000 smash-and-grab raid on a high profile jewellers were jailed today, police said.

Robbers held knife to baby's throat

A baby boy had a knife pressed against his throat by armed robbers who demanded his mother hand over money, it was disclosed today.

Equestrianism: Crashing halt to Townend streak

British rider Oliver Townend has failed in his attempt to land the £230,000 Rolex Grand Slam in spectacular fashion. Townend was airlifted to hospital after suffering a crashing fall on Ashdale Cruise Master during Saturday's Rolex Kentucky cross-country phase.

Observations: Sanaa reaches peak critical acclaim after 15 years

This week, Sanaa, aka the Japanese architects Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, won their profession's Oscar, the $100,000 Pritzker Prize. It's either an extraordinary achievement, or just a sign of our age of cultural velocities, that this design partnership has reached peak critical acclaim after only 15 years. It took Fumihiko Maki, one of Japan's other two Pritzker laureates, decades to get the gong. Ditto the godfather of baroque modernism, Oscar Niemeyer. Even Rem Koolhaas, already a legendary architectural manifesto machine in the early 1970s, had to wait more than 25 years to be anointed.

Hacker's high life brought to end with 20-year sentence

Longest ever jail term, and failure of Asperger's syndrome defence, bodes ill for Gary McKinnon

Learning curve: Sanaa's spectacular floating Lausanne library rockets them into architecture's premier league

In Lausanne yesterday, the feted Japanese architects Kazuo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa – aka Sanaa – became the profession's anointed artists of the floating world. Their new SF110m (£65m) building is a fluid exercise in glass and concrete. It is called the Rolex Learning Centre. Yet visually, it is the reverse – a kind of unlearning centre where the doors of perception melt into a soft vitreous glaze and shape and edge become ambiguous.

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Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
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Fishing for votes with Nigel Farage: The Ukip leader shows how he can work an audience as he casts his line to the disaffected of Grimsby

Fishing is on Nigel Farage's mind

Ukip leader casts a line to the disaffected
Who is bombing whom in the Middle East? It's amazing they don't all hit each other

Who is bombing whom in the Middle East?

Robert Fisk untangles the countries and factions
China's influence on fashion: At the top of the game both creatively and commercially

China's influence on fashion

At the top of the game both creatively and commercially
Lord O’Donnell: Former cabinet secretary on the election and life away from the levers of power

The man known as GOD has a reputation for getting the job done

Lord O'Donnell's three principles of rule
Rainbow shades: It's all bright on the night

Rainbow shades

It's all bright on the night
'It was first time I had ever tasted chocolate. I kept a piece, and when Amsterdam was liberated, I gave it to the first Allied soldier I saw'

Bread from heaven

Dutch survivors thank RAF for World War II drop that saved millions
Britain will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power - Labour

How 'the Axe' helped Labour

UK will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power
Rare and exclusive video shows the horrific price paid by activists for challenging the rule of jihadist extremists in Syria

The price to be paid for challenging the rule of extremists

A revolution now 'consuming its own children'
Welcome to the world of Megagames

Welcome to the world of Megagames

300 players take part in Watch the Skies! board game in London
'Nymphomaniac' actress reveals what it was really like to star in one of the most explicit films ever

Charlotte Gainsbourg on 'Nymphomaniac'

Starring in one of the most explicit films ever
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers

Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi

The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers
Vince Cable interview: Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'

Vince Cable exclusive interview

Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'
Iwan Rheon interview: Game of Thrones star returns to his Welsh roots to record debut album

Iwan Rheon is returning to his Welsh roots

Rheon is best known for his role as the Bastard of Bolton. It's gruelling playing a sadistic torturer, he tells Craig McLean, but it hasn't stopped him recording an album of Welsh psychedelia
Morne Hardenberg interview: Cameraman for BBC's upcoming show Shark on filming the ocean's most dangerous predator

It's time for my close-up

Meet the man who films great whites for a living
Increasing numbers of homeless people in America keep their mobile phones on the streets

Homeless people keep mobile phones

A homeless person with a smartphone is a common sight in the US. And that's creating a network where the 'hobo' community can share information - and fight stigma - like never before