News Former correspondent of the News of the World and Sunday Mirror Dan Evans arrives at the Old Bailey

“Shock” and “anxiety” ran through the editorial floor of the News of the World the day two people were arrested in 2006 in connection with phone hacking. The description, from the former News International staff journalist Dan Evans, was told to the jury at the phone hacking trial.

Glenn Mulcaire outside the Supreme Court after yesterday's ruling

Court tells Glenn Mulcaire to name bosses

The 60 individuals pursuing phone-hacking claims against News International could now be told who inside the News of the World allegedly ordered the private detective Glenn Mulcaire to access their voicemails.

Australian parliamentary Speaker Peter Slipper

Scandal of MP who saved Gillard is exposed as elaborate plot

The sexual harassment case against Australia's former Speaker appears to be a conspiracy

Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation to pursue split plan

Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation is to go ahead with plans to split into separate newspaper and entertainment operations, the company confirmed today.

Murdoch is reportedly planning to 'quarantine' his newspapers in a move that may allow him to make a new bid for BSkyB

Rupert Murdoch ready to break up his scandal-hit media empire

Tycoon may cede day-to-day control of newspapers to focus on entertainment brands

The Diary: Home Office press team flies Jamaica flag for Olympics

Some civil servants are going to be very busy during the Olympics fortnight. Not all, of course – otherwise the Government would not have needed to shell out for 2,300 tickets so civil servants could watch the events, including 410 for the women's beach volleyball, bottom. But at the Home Office and the Foreign Office there will not be a lot of time for enjoying the contests. The Foreign Office will have to look after no fewer than 120 heads of state or heads of government who will be in London, each of whom has to have an assigned official making sure his or her visit goes smoothly. The Home Office is also anticipating a heavy workload, and will be staffed from 6am to 11pm. To keep up morale, the department has organised a competition in which each section of the Home Office is assigned a middle ranking country, and there will be a prize of some sort for the section whose national athletes win the greatest number of gold medals. The press office has Jamaica. This explains why, if you visit the Home Office press office this week, you will see a Jamaican flag prominently displayed.

Boris Johnson said on 23 May: My meetings with News International have already been made public

Boris Johnson under fresh pressure over Rupert Murdoch meeting

Boris Johnson’s links to News International came under fresh scrutiny today after it emerged he had a dinner with Rupert Murdoch days before the Metropolitan Police launched a new inquiry into phone hacking.

Market Report: Penalty time again for BT and BSkyB

With Euro 2012 in full flow, football and that eye-watering, £3bn Premier League TV rights deal was still high on traders' minds.

'No record' that Brown made threatening call to Murdoch

Gordon Brown claimed today that records released by the Cabinet Office confirm his repeated denials that he phoned Rupert Murdoch to declare “war” on the mogul and his media empire.

Cameron defended his appointment of Jeremy Hunt and his decision to hire Andy Coulson as his director of communications

Cameron defends Hunt, Coulson – and his Christmas with Murdoch

The Prime Minister's testimony may have contained a number of memory lapses, but what he did recall was revealing

Nick Clegg was warned that Murdoch's papers would turn against Lib Dems if they opposed BSkyB bid

Nick Clegg was warned that if the Liberal Democrats opposed the Murdoch empire’s bid for BSkyB his newspapers would turn on the party.

Matthew Norman: The brooding, tortured soul of Gordon Brown

He retains his gift, as in the election that never was, for plucking defeat from the oesophagus of victory

Rupert Murdoch sought Europe policy change, Sir John Major tells Leveson Inquiry

Former Conservative prime minister Sir John Major today told an inquiry into press standards that media tycoon Rupert Murdoch asked him to change policy on Europe.

Leveson Inquiry: Brown accuses Sun of carrying out a vendetta against him

Gordon Brown accused the Sun of carrying out a vendetta against him during his last years as Prime Minister.

George Osborne indicates Government will not support Leveson proposals for sweeping press regulation changes

George Osborne today gave the clearest indication yet that the Government will not support proposals for sweeping changes to press regulation even if they are proposed by the Leveson Inquiry.

Some of the senior Lib Dems are set to give their support to a Labour Party motion on Jeremy Hunt this week

Jeremy Hunt should have resigned, says Lib Dems' Lord Oakeshott

A senior Liberal Democrat has said culture secretary Jeremy Hunt should have resigned following his evidence to the Leveson Inquiry about News Corp's failed takeover of BSkyB.

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