Arts and Entertainment

Old luvvies act with gay abandon  in a classic festive sitcom

How I learnt to love being a stepmother

After her 20-year marriage ended in divorce, Terri Wiltshire had come to terms with not having children of her own. But then she fell in love with a father of three boys – and her life changed forever

Into The Little Hill/Down By The Greenwood Side, ROH Linbury Theatre, London

Unpredictable stuff, electricity. While Rigoletto was going full-blast in Covent Garden’s main auditorium, events downstairs in the Linbury studio theatre were suddenly brought to a halt by a power-cut. George Benjamin had just begun to conduct the long-awaited London premiere of his chamber opera Into the Little Hill – with two outstanding soloists and the London Sinfonietta in brilliant form – when everything was plunged into blackness. Time passed, people waited, the power stayed off, and at 10.30pm Benjamin and his performers defiantly delivered a concert performance in the foyer.

Jobless father kills children

Man shoots wife and young family in apparent suicide pact after both are sacked from hospital jobs

Santa gunman 'planned to escape'

A man who dressed as Santa Claus before driving to the home of his former parents-in-law and killing nine people who were seeing in Christmas together planned to escape to Canada, it emerged yesterday.

Editor-At-Large: Haggling in the souk is our new way to shop

Tony Blair might have got in touch with a higher being by embracing Catholicism, but even he has succumbed to that hard drug few can resist: bargain-hunting. Our former prime minister spends his time these days jetting around the world trying to kick-start peace in the Middle East, but he rearranged his schedule to be first through the door at the Armani sale in swanky Knightsbridge – they even opened an hour early so Tony could spend thousands on clothing discounted up to 50 per cent, unmolested by fellow shoppers.

Santa gunman kills nine and torches house

Eight-year-old girl survives shot to the face

Gunman dressed as Santa kills six at party

By Guy Adams in Los Angeles

Terence Blacker: It's enough to make you believe in God

It is a difficult week for those of us of little faith. At every turn, there are songs in the air about certain poor shepherds, the angelic host proclaiming, the mother mild, the wondrous childhood all deep and crisp and even, and so on. It would be unfair to compare this assault of carols to the torture of prisoners in Guantanamo Bay by the repeated playing of Queen's "We Are the Champions", but the effect is still discomfiting.

Police investigating mass Santa brawl

Detectives were today investigating after a group of men dressed as Father Christmas got into a fight.

Christmas: A Dickens of a time

Cheer and churchgoing, feasting and dancing, drinking and kissing, bonhomie and benevolence. If these are the things we think of when we think of Christmas, then we've got the Victorian era's greatest novelist to thank, argues John Walsh

Jonathan Trigell: Get that tree out of my post office

There is a Christmas tree in my local post office. You might think that the most unusual part of that, in these days of closures, is that I have a local post office. But I live in France, where religious symbols are strictly banned from state institutions and so I can't really see how they can get away with it. If you don't think that a Christmas tree is really a religious symbol, ask yourself how comfortable you would feel decorating one in Iran?

Kate Mosse: The great stocking swindle

Memories shift, crack, slide over time. Some become more colourful, distinctive, significant. Others retain the power to sting, to undermine, to wound, even decades after. We ascribe adult motivations to childish impulses, paint ourselves in a more flattering light. We read novels, about childhood, of coming age, and are seduced into thinking of ourselves as more thoughtful, more original than ever we were.

Neil Gaiman: Hanukkah with bells on

I do not recall lobbying for anything, as a boy, as hard as I lobbied, with my sisters, for a Christmas tree.

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Refugee crisis: David Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia - will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi?

Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia...

But will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi, asks Robert Fisk
Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

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Joe Biden's 'tease tour': Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?

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Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

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Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

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Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

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King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

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It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

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Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

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