News A Save the Children organised event at Al Zaatari refugee camp in the Jordanian city of Mafraq, near the Syrian border, last month

The charity defends itself from claim it refrained from criticising its backers

Gigs of the week (08/12/12): Christmas at the Union Chapel, Union Chapel, London N1

One of London's loveliest venues flings open its doors to the seasonal spirit this week, with music, merriment, mince pies and a display of dodgy pullovers on offer over two nights at the Union Chapel.

Save the Children ambassador Myleene Klass models a Christmas jumper

Fashion: 'Twas the knit before Christmas...

Seasonal sweaters have shaken off their comedy image to become really rather stylish – and there's even a charity day devoted to wearing them. It's enough to make you jumper for joy

Child hunger on the increase, says new report

Children in the UK continue to enjoy some of the best standards of living in the world despite a global increase in child hunger, according to research by a leading charity.

Government pledges £1bn to family planning in developing world

The Government will today pledge to donate more than £1 billion to help family planning services in the developing world.

Pregnancy is 'biggest teenage killer worldwide'

Pregnancy is the biggest killer of teenage girls worldwide, a charity has said.

The employment lottery: two recent Cambridge grads' two very different experiences

Contrary to popular belief, a degree from a top university doesn’t guarantee a job after university. Many graduates struggle for months to find gainful employment, filling out endless applications to no avail, with the spectre of their student loan hanging over them.

Delays in seeking treatment 'lead to cancer deaths'

Nearly 40% of people who fear they might have cancer delay visiting a doctor because they are worried about what they will find, according to new research.

280,000 girls accept sex abuse as being normal

As many as 280,000 teenage girls are suffering from sexual abuse because they believe it is an accepted part of relationships or do not believe they can stop it, the NSPCC has warned.

Diary: Archbishop's sermon may cost him a place in The Sun

I hear from someone in a position to know that Lambeth Palace is not pleased with the unusual “Sunday Service” delivered by the Archbishop of York, Dr John Sentamu, in a column in The Sun on Sunday.

Miller: both Nordoff-Robbins and the BRIT School have reason to thank him

Andrew Miller: Concert promoter and lauded fund-raiser

Nobody buys a concert ticket because of the name of the promoter at the top of the poster or on the ticket. Yet when something goes wrong on a tour or at an outdoor event the promoter often gets the blame – from the paying public, the media and the artists themselves. That this hardly ever happened to the British concert promoter Andrew Miller, during his four decades of putting on the likes of Barry Manilow, Meat Loaf and Nana Mouskouri, is testament to his organisational and personal qualities.

Edinburgh's Forest Fringe branches out

The Forest Fringe is putting down roots in London with a residency at the Gate. The tiny, not-for-profit hub started life in 2007, churning out free, round-the-clock experimental theatre in the Forest Café, just off Bristo Square at the heart of the Edinburgh Fringe. Over five years it has become a crucial stop-off for anyone looking for the next big thing from new work by Bryony Kimmings to Kindle's play/ dinner party held in the back of a van. Last year, Daniel Kitson performed a midnight gig at the cafe that went on until dawn.

Government aims to clear adoption hurdles

The Government is to legislate to ensure that potential adoptions are not blocked purely because the would-be parents are not the same race as the child, Education Secretary Michael Gove announced today.

300 children die every hour of every day because of malnutrition

Special report: The hungry generation

One young child in four around the world is too malnourished to grow properly, a major new investigation reveals

£800m funding for waterways trust

The new “national trust for waterways” will receive £800 million in funding over the next 15 years to help it look after canals and rivers, the Government said today.

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Stephanie first after her public appearance as a woman at Rad Fest 2014
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Bryan Cranston as Walter White, in the acclaimed series 'Breaking Bad'
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Russell Brand at an anti-austerity march in June
peopleActor and comedian says 'there's no point doing it if you're not'
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Banksy's 'The Girl with the Pierced Eardrum' in Bristol
art'Girl with the Pierced Eardrum' followed hoax reports artist had been arrested and unveiled
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Oscar Pistorius is led out of court in Pretoria. Pistorius received a five-year prison sentence for culpable homicide by judge Thokozile Masipais for the killing of his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp
voicesThokozile Masipa simply had no choice but to jail the athlete
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Sister Cristina Scuccia sings 'Like a Virgin' in Venice
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Like Madonna, Sister Cristina Scuccia's video is also set in Venice

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Two super-sized ships have cruised into British waters, but how big can these behemoths get?

Super-sized ships: How big can they get?

Two of the largest vessels in the world cruised into UK waters last week
British doctors on brink of 'cure' for paralysis with spinal cord treatment

British doctors on brink of cure for paralysis

Sufferers can now be offered the possibility of cure thanks to a revolutionary implant of regenerative cells
Let's talk about loss

We need to talk about loss

Secrecy and silence surround stillbirth
Will there be an all-female mission to Mars?

Will there be an all-female mission to Mars?

Women may be better suited to space travel than men are
Oscar Pistorius sentencing: The athlete's wealth and notoriety have provoked a long overdue debate on South African prisons

'They poured water on, then electrified me...'

If Oscar Pistorius is sent to jail, his experience will not be that of other inmates
James Wharton: The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

Life after the Army has brought new battles for the LGBT activist James Wharton
Ebola in the US: Panic over the virus threatens to infect President Obama's midterms

Panic over Ebola threatens to infect the midterms

Just one person has died, yet November's elections may be affected by what Republicans call 'Obama's Katrina', says Rupert Cornwell
Premier League coaches join the RSC to swap the tricks of their trades

Darling, you were fabulous! But offside...

Premier League coaches are joining the RSC to learn acting skills, and in turn they will teach its actors to play football. Nick Clark finds out why
How to dress with authority: Kirsty Wark and Camila Batmanghelidjh discuss the changing role of fashion in women's workwear

How to dress with authority

Kirsty Wark and Camila Batmanghelidjh discuss the changing role of fashion in women's workwear
New book on Joy Division's Ian Curtis sheds new light on the life of the late singer

New book on Ian Curtis sheds fresh light on the life of the late singer

'Joy Division were making art... Ian was for real' says author Jon Savage
Sean Harris: A rare interview with British acting's secret weapon

Sean Harris: A rare interview with British acting's secret weapon

The Bafta-winner talks Hollywood, being branded a psycho, and how Barbra Streisand is his true inspiration
Tim Minchin, interview: The musician, comedian and world's favourite ginger is on scorching form

Tim Minchin interview

For a no-holds-barred comedian who is scathing about woolly thinking and oppressive religiosity, he is surprisingly gentle in person
Boris Johnson's boozing won't win the puritan vote

Boris's boozing won't win the puritan vote

Many of us Brits still disapprove of conspicuous consumption – it's the way we were raised, says DJ Taylor
Ash frontman Tim Wheeler reveals how he came to terms with his father's dementia

Tim Wheeler: Alzheimer's, memories and my dad

Wheeler's dad suffered from Alzheimer's for three years. When he died, there was only one way the Ash frontman knew how to respond: with a heartfelt solo album