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A liver transplant patient turned up to her operation appointment at a German hospital with a bottle of vodka in her bag, a court has heard.

Classical Music: Replay/ Robert Cowan makes his pick of the latest reissues

Lotte Lehmann sings Opera and Lieder (Recorded: 1927-1942) (Pearl GEMM CDS 9234, two discs); Liszt: Dante Symphony and tone-poems Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra / Kurt Masur (Recorded: 1979-1980) (EMI Forte CZS5 68598 2, two discs)

Dance: Leipziger Ballet

Igor Stravinsky: Balettabend; Leipzig Opera House

Minorco acquires Tilcon for pounds 330m

TOM STEVENSON

Music Prodigies / Rostropovich LSO Barbican, London

'From her opening pacing, with slightly exaggerated rubato, it was clear that she would be in control'

Tripping the Leipzig fantastic

Tripping the Leipzig fantastic

Suddenly staring defeat in the face

Many Bosnian Serbs believe they have unwittingly become the victims of a clever political collusion

HANDLING BACH Greenwich Theatre, London: Theatre

Once upon a time, there was an ex-music critic who wrote a series of plays about envy between two men. In 1979 he took his argument into the arena of music with the tale of two real-life composers. The play was a big hit and an even bigger film, winning eight Oscars including Best Picture and Best Screenplay. The film was Amadeus and the playwright was Peter Shaffer and not, alas, Paul Barz, whose strikingly similar Handling Bach is receiving its British premiere in Greenwich in a translation by David Bryer.

Stalin and the spoils of war

Millions of art treasures from Germany that Stalin claimed as trophies of victory disappeared from view for decades. Then two Russians, Konstantin Akinsha and Grigorii Kozlov (below) tracked them down. Geraldine Norman tells their story

UPBEAT

Hildegard von Bingen: the "straight pass mix". It had to happen. The 12th-century Benedictine abbess gets the techno treatment on Vision, EMI's latest assault on the cross-over charts. But beneath Richard Souther's New Age washes, "world beat rhythms" and tired drum machines soars a familiar voice - that of Minnesota-born Emily van Evera, solo soprano on the "original" Hildegard album, Hyperion's award-winning 1982 A feather on the breath of God. It's not the first time she's been "sampled". Previously it was used on a TV muesli ad and Hyperion sued. This time, Van Evera got to re-record her bits, although she admits she had no idea of how they'd end up. "It was a real leap of faith." And while she's happy with the idea of one composer re-working another ("it's an old, old tradition"), she concedes that EMI could have signalled the extent of the adaptation more clearly on the cover - "Though you'd have to be pretty doltish not to realise when you listen that this is not medieval." There's no shortage of dolts in the USA where Vision has already sold 200,000 copies, just 50,000 short of the total chalked up by the Hyperion disc in the past 13 years. Chart success has given Van Evera a new celebrity. "I just turned down the Big Breakfast," she says. "Can you believe it, they wanted me to dress up as a nun."

Real life on the silent screen : BOOKS : FICTION

THE FILM EXPLAINER by Gert Hofmann, trs Michael Hofmann Secker £9.99

Duke tells Dresden of UK's deep regret

Reconciliation was the order of the day in Dresden yesterday - the anniversary of the RAF's Second World War bombing raids that destroyed the city 50 years ago.

city slicker dresden

Best-known building: A bombed-out ruin, though not for much longer. The Frauenkirche (above), destroyed in the raids, is still seen by many as the ultimate Dresden building. Rebuilding is due to be completed in time for the city's 800th anniversary in 2006.

metro living for the city Rubble-rousing stuff

For five decades a huge pile of ruins remained at the heart of Dresden - the Frauenkirche, casualty of the Allied fire bombing in 1945. Now the church is being reconstructed. Steve Crawshaw reports

Dresden extends its olive branch to royalty

Fifty years after Allied aircraft razed the city, reconciliation is in the air, writes Steve Crawshaw in Bonn

Kohl fails to see joke in row over TV satire

Never use a diplomatic nutcracker when a giant sledgehammer will do. That seems to be Bonn's policy when it comes to media criticism.
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Ben Little, right, is a Labour supporter while Jonathan Rogers supports the Green Party
general election 2015
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The 91st Hakone Ekiden Qualifier at Showa Kinen Park, Tokyo, 2014
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Life and Style
Former helicopter pilot Major Tim Peake will become the first UK astronaut in space for over 20 years
food + drinkNothing but the best for British astronaut as chef Heston Blumenthal cooks up his rations
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Kim Wilde began gardening in the 1990s when she moved to the countryside
peopleThe singer is leading an appeal for the charity Thrive, which uses the therapy of horticulture
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Alexis Sanchez celebrates scoring a second for Arsenal against Reading
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An easy-peel potato; Dave Hax has come up with an ingenious method in food preparation
voicesDave Hax's domestic tips are reminiscent of George Orwell's tea routine. The world might need revolution, but we like to sweat the small stuff, says DJ Taylor
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Japan's population is projected to fall dramatically in the next 50 years (Wikimedia)
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Buyers of secondhand cars are searching out shades last seen in cop show ‘The Sweeney’
motoringFlares and flounce are back on catwalks but a revival in ’70s car paintjobs was a stack-heeled step too far – until now
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 17 April 2015
NHS struggling to monitor the safety and efficacy of its services outsourced to private providers

Who's monitoring the outsourced NHS services?

A report finds that private firms are not being properly assessed for their quality of care
Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

The Tory MP said he did not want to stand again unless his party's manifesto ruled out a third runway. But he's doing so. Watch this space
How do Greek voters feel about Syriza's backtracking on its anti-austerity pledge?

How do Greeks feel about Syriza?

Five voters from different backgrounds tell us what they expect from Syriza's charismatic leader Alexis Tsipras
From Iraq to Libya and Syria: The wars that come back to haunt us

The wars that come back to haunt us

David Cameron should not escape blame for his role in conflicts that are still raging, argues Patrick Cockburn
Sam Baker and Lauren Laverne: Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

A new website is trying to declutter the internet to help busy women. Holly Williams meets the founders
Heston Blumenthal to cook up a spice odyssey for British astronaut manning the International Space Station

UK's Major Tum to blast off on a spice odyssey

Nothing but the best for British astronaut as chef Heston Blumenthal cooks up his rations
John Harrison's 'longitude' clock sets new record - 300 years on

‘Longitude’ clock sets new record - 300 years on

Greenwich horologists celebrate as it keeps to within a second of real time over a 100-day test
Fears in the US of being outgunned in the vital propaganda wars by Russia, China - and even Isis - have prompted a rethink on overseas broadcasters

Let the propaganda wars begin - again

'Accurate, objective, comprehensive': that was Voice of America's creed, but now its masters want it to promote US policy, reports Rupert Cornwell
Why Japan's incredible long-distance runners will never win the London Marathon

Japan's incredible long-distance runners

Every year, Japanese long-distance runners post some of the world's fastest times – yet, come next weekend, not a single elite competitor from the country will be at the London Marathon
Why does Tom Drury remain the greatest writer you've never heard of?

Tom Drury: The quiet American

His debut was considered one of the finest novels of the past 50 years, and he is every bit the equal of his contemporaries, Jonathan Franzen, Dave Eggers and David Foster Wallace
You should judge a person by how they peel a potato

You should judge a person by how they peel a potato

Dave Hax's domestic tips are reminiscent of George Orwell's tea routine. The world might need revolution, but we like to sweat the small stuff, says DJ Taylor
Beige is back: The drab car colours of the 1970s are proving popular again

Beige to the future

Flares and flounce are back on catwalks but a revival in ’70s car paintjobs was a stack-heeled step too far – until now
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef's dishes highlight the delicate essence of fresh cheeses

Bill Granger cooks with fresh cheeses

More delicate on the palate, milder, fresh cheeses can also be kinder to the waistline
Aston Villa vs Liverpool: 'This FA Cup run has been wonderful,' says veteran Shay Given

Shay Given: 'This FA Cup run has been wonderful'

The Villa keeper has been overlooked for a long time and has unhappy memories of the national stadium – but he is savouring his chance to play at Wembley
Timeless drama of Championship race in league of its own - Michael Calvin

Michael Calvin's Last Word

Timeless drama of Championship race in league of its own