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A liver transplant patient turned up to her operation appointment at a German hospital with a bottle of vodka in her bag, a court has heard.

Classical Music: Replay/ Robert Cowan makes his pick of the latest reissues

Lotte Lehmann sings Opera and Lieder (Recorded: 1927-1942) (Pearl GEMM CDS 9234, two discs); Liszt: Dante Symphony and tone-poems Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra / Kurt Masur (Recorded: 1979-1980) (EMI Forte CZS5 68598 2, two discs)

Dance: Leipziger Ballet

Igor Stravinsky: Balettabend; Leipzig Opera House

Minorco acquires Tilcon for pounds 330m

TOM STEVENSON

Music Prodigies / Rostropovich LSO Barbican, London

'From her opening pacing, with slightly exaggerated rubato, it was clear that she would be in control'

Tripping the Leipzig fantastic

Tripping the Leipzig fantastic

Suddenly staring defeat in the face

Many Bosnian Serbs believe they have unwittingly become the victims of a clever political collusion

HANDLING BACH Greenwich Theatre, London: Theatre

Once upon a time, there was an ex-music critic who wrote a series of plays about envy between two men. In 1979 he took his argument into the arena of music with the tale of two real-life composers. The play was a big hit and an even bigger film, winning eight Oscars including Best Picture and Best Screenplay. The film was Amadeus and the playwright was Peter Shaffer and not, alas, Paul Barz, whose strikingly similar Handling Bach is receiving its British premiere in Greenwich in a translation by David Bryer.

Stalin and the spoils of war

Millions of art treasures from Germany that Stalin claimed as trophies of victory disappeared from view for decades. Then two Russians, Konstantin Akinsha and Grigorii Kozlov (below) tracked them down. Geraldine Norman tells their story

UPBEAT

Hildegard von Bingen: the "straight pass mix". It had to happen. The 12th-century Benedictine abbess gets the techno treatment on Vision, EMI's latest assault on the cross-over charts. But beneath Richard Souther's New Age washes, "world beat rhythms" and tired drum machines soars a familiar voice - that of Minnesota-born Emily van Evera, solo soprano on the "original" Hildegard album, Hyperion's award-winning 1982 A feather on the breath of God. It's not the first time she's been "sampled". Previously it was used on a TV muesli ad and Hyperion sued. This time, Van Evera got to re-record her bits, although she admits she had no idea of how they'd end up. "It was a real leap of faith." And while she's happy with the idea of one composer re-working another ("it's an old, old tradition"), she concedes that EMI could have signalled the extent of the adaptation more clearly on the cover - "Though you'd have to be pretty doltish not to realise when you listen that this is not medieval." There's no shortage of dolts in the USA where Vision has already sold 200,000 copies, just 50,000 short of the total chalked up by the Hyperion disc in the past 13 years. Chart success has given Van Evera a new celebrity. "I just turned down the Big Breakfast," she says. "Can you believe it, they wanted me to dress up as a nun."

Real life on the silent screen : BOOKS : FICTION

THE FILM EXPLAINER by Gert Hofmann, trs Michael Hofmann Secker £9.99

Duke tells Dresden of UK's deep regret

Reconciliation was the order of the day in Dresden yesterday - the anniversary of the RAF's Second World War bombing raids that destroyed the city 50 years ago.

city slicker dresden

Best-known building: A bombed-out ruin, though not for much longer. The Frauenkirche (above), destroyed in the raids, is still seen by many as the ultimate Dresden building. Rebuilding is due to be completed in time for the city's 800th anniversary in 2006.

metro living for the city Rubble-rousing stuff

For five decades a huge pile of ruins remained at the heart of Dresden - the Frauenkirche, casualty of the Allied fire bombing in 1945. Now the church is being reconstructed. Steve Crawshaw reports

Dresden extends its olive branch to royalty

Fifty years after Allied aircraft razed the city, reconciliation is in the air, writes Steve Crawshaw in Bonn

Kohl fails to see joke in row over TV satire

Never use a diplomatic nutcracker when a giant sledgehammer will do. That seems to be Bonn's policy when it comes to media criticism.
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Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent
Markus Persson: If being that rich is so bad, why not just give it all away?

That's a bit rich

The billionaire inventor of computer game Minecraft says he is bored, lonely and isolated by his vast wealth. If it’s that bad, says Simon Kelner, why not just give it all away?
Euro 2016: Chris Coleman on course to end half a century of hurt for Wales

Coleman on course to end half a century of hurt for Wales

Wales last qualified for major tournament in 1958 but after several near misses the current crop can book place at Euro 2016 and end all the indifference
Rugby World Cup 2015: The tournament's forgotten XV

Forgotten XV of the rugby World Cup

Now the squads are out, Chris Hewett picks a side of stars who missed the cut
A groundbreaking study of 'Britain's Atlantis' long buried at the bottom of the North Sea could revolutionise how we see our prehistoric past

Britain's Atlantis

Scientific study beneath North Sea could revolutionise how we see the past
The Queen has 'done and said nothing that anybody will remember,' says Starkey

The Queen has 'done and said nothing that anybody will remember'

David Starkey's assessment
Oliver Sacks said his life has been 'an enormous privilege and adventure'

'An enormous privilege and adventure'

Oliver Sacks writing about his life
'Gibraltar is British, and it is going to stay British forever'

'Gibraltar is British, and it is going to stay British forever'

The Rock's Chief Minister hits back at Spanish government's 'lies'
Britain is still addicted to 'dirty coal'

Britain still addicted to 'dirty' coal

Biggest energy suppliers are more dependent on fossil fuel than a decade ago
Orthorexia nervosa: How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition

Orthorexia nervosa

How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition
Lady Chatterley is not obscene, says TV director

Lady Chatterley’s Lover

Director Jed Mercurio on why DH Lawrence's novel 'is not an obscene story'
Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests

Set a pest to catch a pest

Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests