Sport on TV: Football really can give us a positive mental attitude

As the big beast of the Premier League is released from its cage once again, it's all too easy to forget that football is simply about a bunch of boys (or girls) chasing a ball around, not pampered heroes and image rights. Maybe the game can bring out the worst in people but it also provides an escape.

TV review: Football, Madness and Me, BBC3 - For Jamal, football is one

For all the glamour of the Premiership, the real thing that gives the Beautiful Game its beauty is the indelible joy of playing the game. From a kick-about in the park to Villa Park, the actual joy of participation tends to outweigh watching others play the game. Which is why – during summer Olympic, cycling, cricketing or tennis glories – it’s frustrating when the behaviour of a few in the upper echelons of the game gives people a stick to beat football with.

Invisible Ink: No 173 - Robert M Pirsig

In the roll-call of student summer reading certain volumes stand out, including Desmond Morris's body language phenomenon The Naked Ape and Richard Bach's Jonathan Livingston Seagull. To those can be added a volume by Robert M Pirsig that snuggled its way into every hitchhiker's hand-crocheted body satchel. Unlike Bach, whose books were like being hit with a wiffle bat full of pot-pourri, Pirsig is the real deal. Born in 1928, this precocious university student was eventually expelled for studying too hard, after growing bewildered by the choice of multiple hypotheses in his chosen field, biochemistry. Overwhelmed by the limitations of science, he tackled Eastern philosophy instead, spending time in India before returning to a US college.

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Depression deserves funds, says Ruby Wax

The Government is diverting money to “sexy” diseases like breast cancer when it could save billions in the long term by tackling the root causes of mental illness, the comedian Ruby Wax has claimed.