Allegations of slush fund cash payments hit Spanish PM Mariano Rajoy

Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy was allegedly paid from a slush fund operated by the governing People’s Party (PP) when he was a minister in the 1990s, according to documents published in the newspaper El Mundo. The accusations drew denials from the PP and calls for Mr Rajoy’s resignation, from opposition parties weary of austerity measures and an economy mired in recession.

Thomas Jackson: Judge who tried to split up Microsoft

Thomas Penfield Jackson, who died of cancer on 16 June at the age of 76, was a federal judge in Washington who presided over a Microsoft antitrust case and ordered the software giant to be split up. He also presided over the the drug possession trial of the former Mayor of Washington, Marion Barry.

US Defence Secretary Chuck Hagel uses security conference to warn

Defence Secretary Chuck Hagel delivered a two-pronged message to Beijing — holding out hope for a slowly improving military relationship with the Asian giant while issuing a stern warning on cyber attacks coming from that country. But he was met with immediate scepticism from the Chinese delegation in the audience, who questioned America's role in the Pacific.

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State senator's vicious and bonkers email exchange goes viral

If you’re an elected representative, you can expect to get a few letters and emails from constituents who sound unhinged, but constituents don’t expect the unhinged emails to come from the other direction. Brian Nieves, a state senator from Missouri, has hit the headlines in the US for just this reason – after his vicious and bonkers exchange with a constituent went viral.

Blow to Obama as US Senate defeats gun control bill

The US Senate has voted against new legislation to expand background checks for gun purchasers, dealing a blow to President Barack Obama's hopes of gun control reform after the school shootings at Sandy Hook in December.