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Apple's disappointing update this week sent shares in most of its suppliers tumbling, but smartphone parts maker Laird got City approval after its strategy update yesterday.

Cargo ship damaged after collision off Istanbul

A cargo ship struggled to pump out water that seeped in through cracks today after it brushed against two anchored ships while trying to moor during strong winds off the coast of Istanbul, but a senior maritime official said it was not in danger of sinking.

Sorie Sesay, 10, carries packets of water to sell in Freetown

The hunt for the lost children of Sierra Leone

The war left a generation on the streets and invisible. Can a census help them rebuild their lives?

Marc Bolan's legacy moves to African school for orphans

There is a corner of a field in Sierra Leone that will for ever resound to the very English strains of Marc Bolan. The war-torn African state is the unlikely location of a school for orphaned children created by the glam rock star's family in order to continue his legacy.

Fred Marafono: South Pacific warrior whose heart belongs in Sierra Leone

The fearless SAS veteran is still angry about what happened in the blood diamond wars. Now, he's putting the record straight. Jonathan Owen meets Fred Marafono

Aminatta Forna: 'My country had a war. It would be extraordinary not to want to write about that'

Aminatta Forna has put Sierra Leone on the literary map. On the eve of the Orange Prize for Fiction, Boyd Tonkin meets her

Sarah Brown: 'I should have spoken up about the things said about Gordon'

Power is not what attracted me to Gordon Having power has to be about the contribution a person can make. It was how he has been able to take the thing that he is good at and use it to serve, through political life. As Martin Luther King said: "Everybody can be great... because everybody can serve."

The Memory of Love, By Aminatta Forna

This richly accomplished and satisfying novel, which engages both mind and heart, has rightly made the Orange Prize shortlist. Man Booker judges, where were you?

Three debuts make the Orange Prize shortlist

Three first-time novelists tackling macabre subjects – the aftermath of conflict in the Balkans, a love affair in a mental institution, and the story of a hermaphrodite baby called Wayne – feature in this year's shortlist for the Orange Prize for Fiction.

Taylor's Sierra Leone war crimes trial ends

The war crimes trial of the former Liberian president, Charles Taylor, ended yesterday with judges expected to take months to reach a verdict on whether he can be linked to murders and amputations during Sierra Leone's civil war.

Roger Diski: Social entrepreneur who championed sustainable tourism to post-conflict countries

Roger Diski played an important role in championing sustainable tourism to unlikely destinations. He successfully promoted the principle that local people should benefit environmentally, socially and economically from visitors to their countries – including areas which have emerged from political turbulence and war and are seeking to rebuild.

Liberty's Exiles, By Maya Jasanoff

Did anyone ever literally believe that God speaks English? One suspects not. But there are those who think the Goddess of Liberty does so, even if it was the French who first erected statues for her. There is a smallish but noisy transatlantic group of writers, politicians and think-tankers dedicated to the conviction that the values of freedom and democracy have their birthplaces and natural homes peculiarly – maybe even only – in what some of them call the Anglosphere. That term was popularised in 2004 by James Bennett, with his book The Anglosphere Challenge. It has been taken up by conservative historians like Niall Ferguson and, more stridently, Andrew Roberts, and by groups like the Social Affairs Unit. For a time, especially in the years of the Blair-Bush axis, it seemed to have some friends in very high places.

The Hacker: It's best to stay in the bunker during the Cairo revolution

Hackers are to be found in many other places than looking for their balls in the rough. Take Cairo, for instance. Richard, who has contributed one or two of his hacking experiences to this column in the past, moved to Cairo last year for reasons he hasn't explained.

'Even the middle classes are hit by war'

Warwick Prize shortlisted author Aminatta Forna tells Matthew Bell why she keeps returning to the conflicts of her past

Letters: What Cameron's Big Society might mean

The argument on what constitutes the Big Society is currently polarised between the "big battalions" of the state and the "little platoons" of civil society. ("How to kill a political dream", 7 February) This is a false dichotomy.

Liberian war crimes trial delayed again

The former Liberian president Charles Taylor and his lawyer, who boycotted the West African ruler's war crimes trial for a third day yesterday, have been granted the right to appeal over key documentation.

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Seifeddine Rezgui: What motivated a shy student to kill 38 holidaymakers in Tunisia?

Making of a killer

What motivated a shy student to kill 38 holidaymakers in Tunisia?
UK Heatwave: Temperatures on the tube are going to exceed the legal limit for transporting cattle

Just when you thought your commute couldn't get any worse...

Heatwave will see temperatures on the Tube exceed legal limit for transporting cattle
Exclusive - The Real Stories of Migrant Britain: Swapping Bucharest for London

The Real Stories of Migrant Britain

Meet the man who swapped Romania for the UK in a bid to provide for his family, only to discover that the home he left behind wasn't quite what it seemed
Cheaper energy on the way, but it's not all sunshine and rainbows

Cheaper energy on the way, but it's not all sunshine and rainbows

Solar power will help bring down electricity prices over the next five years, according to a new report. But it’s cheap imports of ‘dirty power’ that will lower them the most
Katy Perry prevented from buying California convent for $14.5m after nuns sell to local businesswoman instead

No grace of God for Katy Perry as sisters act to stop her buying convent

Archdiocese sues nuns who turned down star’s $14.5m because they don’t approve of her
Ajmer: The ancient Indian metropolis chosen to be a 'smart city' where residents would just be happy to have power and running water

Residents just want water and power in a city chosen to be a ‘smart’ metropolis

The Indian Government has launched an ambitious plan to transform 100 of its crumbling cities
Michael Fassbender in 'Macbeth': The Scottish play on film, from Welles to Cheggers

Something wicked?

Films of Macbeth don’t always end well - just ask Orson Welles... and Keith Chegwin
10 best sun creams for body

10 best sun creams for body

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Wimbledon 2015: Nick Bollettieri - Milos Raonic has ability to get to the top but he must learn to handle pressure in big games

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Milos Raonic has ability to get to the top but he must learn to handle pressure in big games
Women's World Cup 2015: How England's semi-final success could do wonders for both sexes

There is more than a shiny trophy to be won by England’s World Cup women

The success of the decidedly non-famous females wearing the Three Lions could do wonders for a ‘man’s game’ riddled with cynicism and greed
How to stop an asteroid hitting Earth: Would people co-operate to face down a global peril?

How to stop an asteroid hitting Earth

Would people cooperate to face a global peril?
Just one day to find €1.6bn: Greece edges nearer euro exit

One day to find €1.6bn

Greece is edging inexorably towards an exit from the euro
New 'Iron Man' augmented reality technology could help surgeons and firefighters, say scientists

'Iron Man' augmented reality technology could become reality

Holographic projections would provide extra information on objects in a person's visual field in real time
Sugary drinks 'are killing 184,000 adults around the world every year'

Sugary drinks are killing 184,000 adults around the world every year

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Pride of Place: Historians map out untold LGBT histories of locations throughout UK

Historians map out untold LGBT histories

Public are being asked to help improve the map