News

Apple's disappointing update this week sent shares in most of its suppliers tumbling, but smartphone parts maker Laird got City approval after its strategy update yesterday.

Taylor still snubbing war crimes trial at The Hague

Former Liberian President Charles Taylor maintained his boycott of his war crimes trial for a second day yesterday, prompting judges to adjourn the case to consider whether to allow a defence appeal over key documents.

Taylor's lawyer walks out on tribunal

The lawyer representing Charles Taylor stormed out of court yesterday after judges refused to accept a written summary of the former Liberian president's defence at the end of his landmark war crimes case.

Charles Taylor's lawyer storms out of court

Charles Taylor's lawyer has stormed out of court after judges refused to accept a written summary of the former Liberian president's defence case at the end of his war crimes trial in the Netherlands.

Ivory Coast's Gbagbo gets ultimatum to go into exile

West African leaders delivered a final ultimatum to Laurent Gbagbo in person yesterday, threatening that the military would oust him if he doesn't go into exile, a month after the disputed election.

Cooper: We should have criticised US over human rights

Labour is preparing a break with its recent past by dropping its unquestioning support of US foreign policy under Tony Blair and Gordon Brown.

Geoffrey Robertson QC: The Great Defender

One man stands between Julian Assange and extradition. Fortunately for the WikiLeaks founder, he is a barrister whose brilliance has won some of the defining legal battles of the age

Appeal: Raped by the enemy, shunned by friends

The 'bush wives' were the forgotten victims of Sierra Leone's civil war. Now their plight is being addressed.

Sierra Leone: Wildlife, white sands, and a new wisdom

Nick Redmayne returns to this formerly war-torn West African country to find that it now welcomes tourists with open arms...and cold beers

A History of the World in 100 Objects, Radio 4, Monday-Friday

Two million years of human ingenuity measured out in flukes and treasures

Small Talk: Confidence on Aim is rising despite fear of Coalition cutbacks

George Osborne's axe is on its way and the doomsayers reckon that if applied too heavily, it could send the economy back into recession. But as reported in this column in recent months, the gloom appears to be lifting on the Alternative Investment Market (Aim). Several pieces of research have indicated that more companies are considering a listing or raising more money, and all the pointers show that confidence is on the up on the small-cap index.

Thrill seekers - The transience of earthly pleasures

The latest group show organised by All Visual Arts sees artists such as the Chapman Brothers, Polly Morgan and Paul Fryer contributing works looking at the impermanence of pleasure when viewed from the perspective of death.

Chasing the Devil: The Search for Africa's Fighting Spirit, By Tim Butcher

It's not unusual in West Africa to see dancing "devils" entertaining a crowd of amused local people. Tim Butcher encountered one shortly after crossing the border between Sierra Leone and Liberia, and he describes it in his new book as a masked figure – the headpiece carved from a single piece of jet-black wood – with a floor-length raffia skirt. Everyone knows there's a human being underneath, but the "devil" is accompanied by a young man who keeps brushing its skirt flat to maintain the illusion.

MoD pays £100,000 to weapons expert

A former bomb disposal expert has been awarded more than £100,000 compensation by the Ministry of Defence because the Army failed to treat him for post-traumatic stress disorder. The unnamed soldier, who served in Britain, the Gulf, Northern Ireland, Bosnia, Nigeria and Sierra Leone, was medically discharged in 2004 after 20 years of service but argued that he would not have had a breakdown later on had his condition been properly monitored and treated.

'HIV is no longer an epidemic. But the stigma is'

A German court case has shone a light on the social impact of infection

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown: Naomi Campbell isn't at fault

State villainy carries on in the world because high-minded leaders can let go of the moral principles when the time, cause or the price is right
News
Jeremy Clarkson
people
News
Ben Little, right, is a Labour supporter while Jonathan Rogers supports the Green Party
general election 2015
News
The 91st Hakone Ekiden Qualifier at Showa Kinen Park, Tokyo, 2014
news
Life and Style
Former helicopter pilot Major Tim Peake will become the first UK astronaut in space for over 20 years
food + drinkNothing but the best for British astronaut as chef Heston Blumenthal cooks up his rations
News
Kim Wilde began gardening in the 1990s when she moved to the countryside
peopleThe singer is leading an appeal for the charity Thrive, which uses the therapy of horticulture
Sport
Alexis Sanchez celebrates scoring a second for Arsenal against Reading
football
Life and Style
health
Voices
An easy-peel potato; Dave Hax has come up with an ingenious method in food preparation
voicesDave Hax's domestic tips are reminiscent of George Orwell's tea routine. The world might need revolution, but we like to sweat the small stuff, says DJ Taylor
News
i100
News
Japan's population is projected to fall dramatically in the next 50 years (Wikimedia)
news
Latest stories from i100
Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 17 April 2015
NHS struggling to monitor the safety and efficacy of its services outsourced to private providers

Who's monitoring the outsourced NHS services?

A report finds that private firms are not being properly assessed for their quality of care
Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

The Tory MP said he did not want to stand again unless his party's manifesto ruled out a third runway. But he's doing so. Watch this space
How do Greek voters feel about Syriza's backtracking on its anti-austerity pledge?

How do Greeks feel about Syriza?

Five voters from different backgrounds tell us what they expect from Syriza's charismatic leader Alexis Tsipras
From Iraq to Libya and Syria: The wars that come back to haunt us

The wars that come back to haunt us

David Cameron should not escape blame for his role in conflicts that are still raging, argues Patrick Cockburn
Sam Baker and Lauren Laverne: Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

A new website is trying to declutter the internet to help busy women. Holly Williams meets the founders
Heston Blumenthal to cook up a spice odyssey for British astronaut manning the International Space Station

UK's Major Tum to blast off on a spice odyssey

Nothing but the best for British astronaut as chef Heston Blumenthal cooks up his rations
John Harrison's 'longitude' clock sets new record - 300 years on

‘Longitude’ clock sets new record - 300 years on

Greenwich horologists celebrate as it keeps to within a second of real time over a 100-day test
Fears in the US of being outgunned in the vital propaganda wars by Russia, China - and even Isis - have prompted a rethink on overseas broadcasters

Let the propaganda wars begin - again

'Accurate, objective, comprehensive': that was Voice of America's creed, but now its masters want it to promote US policy, reports Rupert Cornwell
Why Japan's incredible long-distance runners will never win the London Marathon

Japan's incredible long-distance runners

Every year, Japanese long-distance runners post some of the world's fastest times – yet, come next weekend, not a single elite competitor from the country will be at the London Marathon
Why does Tom Drury remain the greatest writer you've never heard of?

Tom Drury: The quiet American

His debut was considered one of the finest novels of the past 50 years, and he is every bit the equal of his contemporaries, Jonathan Franzen, Dave Eggers and David Foster Wallace
You should judge a person by how they peel a potato

You should judge a person by how they peel a potato

Dave Hax's domestic tips are reminiscent of George Orwell's tea routine. The world might need revolution, but we like to sweat the small stuff, says DJ Taylor
Beige is back: The drab car colours of the 1970s are proving popular again

Beige to the future

Flares and flounce are back on catwalks but a revival in ’70s car paintjobs was a stack-heeled step too far – until now
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef's dishes highlight the delicate essence of fresh cheeses

Bill Granger cooks with fresh cheeses

More delicate on the palate, milder, fresh cheeses can also be kinder to the waistline
Aston Villa vs Liverpool: 'This FA Cup run has been wonderful,' says veteran Shay Given

Shay Given: 'This FA Cup run has been wonderful'

The Villa keeper has been overlooked for a long time and has unhappy memories of the national stadium – but he is savouring his chance to play at Wembley
Timeless drama of Championship race in league of its own - Michael Calvin

Michael Calvin's Last Word

Timeless drama of Championship race in league of its own