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NewsCred, a marketing technology firm that creates and licenses editorial content for businesses, was today valued at an estimated £120 million after it raised £15 million to expand in London.

The Monday Interview: Paul Krugman; Keeping the barbarians at bay

A superstar professor fights a lone crusade against the onslaught of fashionable economic notions. He spoke to Diane Coyle

Silicon Valley besieged by chip robbers

SAN JOSE, California, is known as the safest big city in the US, but Arthur Fonda lives there in a state of suburban siege.

California dreaming

The west coast is reborn as a high-tech boom sweeps away memories of riots and recession, writes Tim Cornwell

BOOKS : FICTION : Gnomes in nerdsville

MICROSERFS by Douglas Coupland, Flamingo pounds 9.99

Forgetting is the best revenge

BURY ME STANDING: The Gypsies and their Journey by Isabel Fonseca, Chatto pounds 18

Morgan Crucible strategy pays off

THE INVESTMENT COLUMN

Lords of Silicon Valley: Larry Black on the auction of a media empire that wields a unique power in the computer world

IN a year of US media mega-deals, the most important property to change hands may not be a Hollywood studio or an American cable- television company.

The disembodied corporation: Tom Peters On excellence

FUTURIST Alvin Toffler, at a conference on the fate of Silicon Valley, proposed - only half-facetiously - the creation of an Academy of Intangible Assets Accountants. Why? Toffler says we are moving from a 'brute force economy' to a 'brain force economy'.

We can think. Now we must do

IN A nutshell, William Waldegrave's problem is that Alan Sugar is not Isambard Kingdom Brunel. The former is a clever businessman producing the cheapest consumer applications of risk-free, largely foreign technology. The latter was a heroic genius of design and engineering, creating his own technology on the job and taking breathtaking risks, most of which came off. The problem is that we see ourselves as a nation of Brunels, whereas the best hope we have is that we become a nation of Sugars - niche exploiters of the technology of the Pacific Rim and the United States.

Profile: Renaissance Manager: John Sculley of Apple is a harbinger of the new digital age. Larry Black reports from New York

A FEW weeks ago, it seemed that John Sculley's name was everywhere. One day the chief executive of Apple Computer would be touted as the next head of the arch-rival IBM, having bought a house in Greenwich, Connecticut, a few minutes from its headquarters. The next, Sculley - a lifelong Republican - would be seen in the gallery of the US Congress, seated next to Hillary Clinton as her husband delivered his first State of the Union message.

Hands-on spells danger

IS THE WORLD trading system heading for a new era of confrontation between and among competing cartels as a result of the 'strategic' targeting of industries? President Clinton's announcement last week that the US administration would pump dollars 17bn over four years into an industry-government programme to create new technologies has raised this fear. Critics warn that the row between the European Community and the United States over Airbus subsidies could be just the start of a new age of commercial wars that will spill over into the next century.

Baby-boomer in the boardroom: Carol Bartz is the most successful woman in the American PC software industry. Phil Reeves talked to her in San Francisco

THROUGH glass ceilings and serious illness, Carol Bartz is at the top. At 44, she is chief executive of Autodesk, one of America's foremost software companies, a front-runner in the baby-boomers' move from middle management to boardroom.

Liberation philosophy can still be oppressive: Roger Trapp has yet to be convinced by the latest book on management flair from the guru Tom Peters

IN THE league of international management experts, Tom Peters is close to the top. His books have shaped attitudes in businesses all over the world.

Science Update: Dear Sir or Computer . . .

COMPANIES in the US are using an 'intelligent' computer to scan CVs of job applicants and weed out those it considers unsuitable. Apple Computer, Nike, Wells Fargo and AT&T are using the system - which its developers claim can scan 900 applications a day. The system, from a company based in Silicon Valley called Resumix, evaluates candidates' backgrounds and tells recruiters if they meet the basic requirements.
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Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine
Letterman's final Late Show: Laughter, but no tears, as David takes his bow after 33 years

Laughter, but no tears, as Letterman takes his bow after 33 years

Veteran talkshow host steps down to plaudits from four presidents
Ivor Novello Awards 2015: Hozier wins with anti-Catholic song 'Take Me To Church' as John Whittingdale leads praise for Black Sabbath

Hozier's 'blasphemous' song takes Novello award

Singer joins Ed Sheeran and Clean Bandit in celebration of the best in British and Irish music
Tequila gold rush: The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product

Join the tequila gold rush

The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product
12 best statement wallpapers

12 best statement wallpapers

Make an impact and transform a room with a conversation-starting pattern
Paul Scholes column: Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?

Paul Scholes column

Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?