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The Monday Interview: Paul Krugman; Keeping the barbarians at bay

A superstar professor fights a lone crusade against the onslaught of fashionable economic notions. He spoke to Diane Coyle

Silicon Valley besieged by chip robbers

SAN JOSE, California, is known as the safest big city in the US, but Arthur Fonda lives there in a state of suburban siege.

California dreaming

The west coast is reborn as a high-tech boom sweeps away memories of riots and recession, writes Tim Cornwell

BOOKS : FICTION : Gnomes in nerdsville

MICROSERFS by Douglas Coupland, Flamingo pounds 9.99

Forgetting is the best revenge

BURY ME STANDING: The Gypsies and their Journey by Isabel Fonseca, Chatto pounds 18

Morgan Crucible strategy pays off

THE INVESTMENT COLUMN

Lords of Silicon Valley: Larry Black on the auction of a media empire that wields a unique power in the computer world

IN a year of US media mega-deals, the most important property to change hands may not be a Hollywood studio or an American cable- television company.

The disembodied corporation: Tom Peters On excellence

FUTURIST Alvin Toffler, at a conference on the fate of Silicon Valley, proposed - only half-facetiously - the creation of an Academy of Intangible Assets Accountants. Why? Toffler says we are moving from a 'brute force economy' to a 'brain force economy'.

We can think. Now we must do

IN A nutshell, William Waldegrave's problem is that Alan Sugar is not Isambard Kingdom Brunel. The former is a clever businessman producing the cheapest consumer applications of risk-free, largely foreign technology. The latter was a heroic genius of design and engineering, creating his own technology on the job and taking breathtaking risks, most of which came off. The problem is that we see ourselves as a nation of Brunels, whereas the best hope we have is that we become a nation of Sugars - niche exploiters of the technology of the Pacific Rim and the United States.

Profile: Renaissance Manager: John Sculley of Apple is a harbinger of the new digital age. Larry Black reports from New York

A FEW weeks ago, it seemed that John Sculley's name was everywhere. One day the chief executive of Apple Computer would be touted as the next head of the arch-rival IBM, having bought a house in Greenwich, Connecticut, a few minutes from its headquarters. The next, Sculley - a lifelong Republican - would be seen in the gallery of the US Congress, seated next to Hillary Clinton as her husband delivered his first State of the Union message.

Hands-on spells danger

IS THE WORLD trading system heading for a new era of confrontation between and among competing cartels as a result of the 'strategic' targeting of industries? President Clinton's announcement last week that the US administration would pump dollars 17bn over four years into an industry-government programme to create new technologies has raised this fear. Critics warn that the row between the European Community and the United States over Airbus subsidies could be just the start of a new age of commercial wars that will spill over into the next century.

Baby-boomer in the boardroom: Carol Bartz is the most successful woman in the American PC software industry. Phil Reeves talked to her in San Francisco

THROUGH glass ceilings and serious illness, Carol Bartz is at the top. At 44, she is chief executive of Autodesk, one of America's foremost software companies, a front-runner in the baby-boomers' move from middle management to boardroom.

Liberation philosophy can still be oppressive: Roger Trapp has yet to be convinced by the latest book on management flair from the guru Tom Peters

IN THE league of international management experts, Tom Peters is close to the top. His books have shaped attitudes in businesses all over the world.

Science Update: Dear Sir or Computer . . .

COMPANIES in the US are using an 'intelligent' computer to scan CVs of job applicants and weed out those it considers unsuitable. Apple Computer, Nike, Wells Fargo and AT&T are using the system - which its developers claim can scan 900 applications a day. The system, from a company based in Silicon Valley called Resumix, evaluates candidates' backgrounds and tells recruiters if they meet the basic requirements.
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Isis hostage crisis: The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power

Isis hostage crisis

The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power, says Robert Fisk
Missing salvage expert who found $50m of sunken treasure before disappearing, tracked down at last

The runaway buccaneers and the ship full of gold

Salvage expert Tommy Thompson found sunken treasure worth millions. Then he vanished... until now
Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Maverick artist Grayson Perry backs our campaign
Assisted Dying Bill: I want to be able to decide about my own death - I want to have control of my life

Assisted Dying Bill: 'I want control of my life'

This week the Assisted Dying Bill is debated in the Lords. Virginia Ironside, who has already made plans for her own self-deliverance, argues that it's time we allowed people a humane, compassionate death
Move over, kale - cabbage is the new rising star

Cabbage is king again

Sophie Morris banishes thoughts of soggy school dinners and turns over a new leaf
11 best winter skin treats

Give your moisturiser a helping hand: 11 best winter skin treats

Get an extra boost of nourishment from one of these hard-working products
Paul Scholes column: The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him

Paul Scholes column

The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him
Frank Warren column: No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans

Frank Warren's Ringside

No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee