News

Yesterday the Environment Secretary said Somerset Levels residents were ‘right to be angry’

Isolated: British soldiers will carry on in Helmand as US troops leave

Give our recovering troops a free holiday, says Fox

Free sunshine breaks, travel tickets and second homes should be offered to recovering soldiers and their families in a bid to lift morale, the former Defence Secretary, Liam Fox, has said.

Warsi investigation 'to pick up loose ends'

An inquiry in to whether Conservative Party co-chairman Baroness Warsi breached the ministerial code will pick up any loose ends, Prime Minister David Cameron said today. 

John Rentoul: There was no cosy deal for Murdoch to gain from

There were no revelations and anyone who was expecting news should have known better

Search continues for missing child and adult after weir incident

Two children were taken to hospital and a search has been launched for another child and an adult missing after an incident at a weir, West Midlands Ambulance Service said.

Leveson Inquiry: Law-breaking very rare says Sky News boss John Ryley

The head of Sky News said journalists have to consider breaking the law to "shed light" on wrongdoing as it emerged that media regulator Ofcom is launching an investigation into the hacking of private email accounts by the broadcaster.

John Darwin, the canoeist who faked his own death to claim life insurance, had his email correspondence with his co-conspirator wife, Anne, hacked by Sky News, the satellite channel admitted yesterday. The network said the criminal act was justified on the grounds of public interest but the revelation is likely to heap further pressure on Rupert Murdoch's News Corp

Sky News: we hacked emails in the public interest

Channel defends illegal accessing of canoe fraudsters' messages

Ian Burrell: Intrusion is unpleasant – but sometimes it's justified

Intrusive as it sounds, a stranger being able to hack into a private email account and root around for information may sometimes be in the public interest. And journalists urgently need a public-interest defence so they can do just that.

Sky News admits hacking emails but says it was 'in the public interest'

Sky News, the British satellite broadcaster, said today that it had hacked into email accounts belonging to members of the public on two separate occasions, but that it had done so in the public interest.

Joan Smith: An intrusion that won't serve justice

It's hardly a secret that the debate on law and order tends to be skewed to the right of the political spectrum. Sentences are too short, prisons are too soft: the discourse of more punishment, less rehabilitation, is depressingly familiar. Now the Government seems ready to cave in to demands that TV cameras should be allowed into courtrooms in England and Wales, supposedly to reassure us that justice is actually being done.

Joan Smith: One TV show I won't be watching

There is a difference between sitting in the public gallery and seeing clips on TV

Leaked riot report identifies 500,000 forgotten families

A report looking into the causes of last year’s riots has identified “500,000 forgotten families,” where a lack of support and opportunities led to a widespread sense of hopelessness among young people.

BSkyB insists removal of website article did not challenge editorial independence

BSkyB today insisted that a decision by its chief executive to order the removal of a story about Formula 1 from the Sky News website for 40 hours did not represent a challenge to the channel’s editorial independence.

Euthanasia case gets legal go-ahead

The High Court today ruled that a paralysed man can begin legal proceedings for a doctor to end his "intolerable life".

Queen puts family first in Christmas Day address

The Queen is to use her Christmas Day broadcast to emphasise the importance of family, friends and community.

Terry is is at risk of being found guilty of a crime that would make his leadership of England's Euro 2012 campaign entirely inappropriate

James Lawton: One-eyed tribalism of supporters who fail to see the harm

A poll was running two-to-one that Suarez was harshly treated

Latest stories from i100
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine
Letterman's final Late Show: Laughter, but no tears, as David takes his bow after 33 years

Laughter, but no tears, as Letterman takes his bow after 33 years

Veteran talkshow host steps down to plaudits from four presidents
Ivor Novello Awards 2015: Hozier wins with anti-Catholic song 'Take Me To Church' as John Whittingdale leads praise for Black Sabbath

Hozier's 'blasphemous' song takes Novello award

Singer joins Ed Sheeran and Clean Bandit in celebration of the best in British and Irish music
Tequila gold rush: The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product

Join the tequila gold rush

The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product
12 best statement wallpapers

12 best statement wallpapers

Make an impact and transform a room with a conversation-starting pattern
Paul Scholes column: Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?

Paul Scholes column

Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?