Arts and Entertainment Mel Smith (right) and Griff Rhys Jones as Jones says his comedy partnership with the late Smith was

Griff Rhys Jones says his comedy partnership with the late Mel Smith was "not exactly a marriage made in heaven".

Nine (12A)

Rob Marshall (119 mins), starring Daniel Day-Lewis, Penelope Cruz, Nicole Kidman, Marion Cotillard, Judi Dench

Bryn Terfel: 'Bad Boys', Royal Festival Hall

Bryn Terfel arrived in the capital armed with countless sneers and as many ways to make mischief. His latest album Bad Boys – a comprehensive gallery of operatic rogues and villains – was now a tour, and there was a big, glossy, souvenir programme to prove it. But at least this latest participant in the South Bank's "International Voices" series offered value for money – the big Welshman doesn’t short-change us, not even when he's in the guise of that prize quack Dr Dulcamara whose lotions and potions are cheap for a reason.

Larry Gelbart: Comedy writer best known for 'M*A*S*H' on television and 'Tootsie' in the cinema

Described by Woody Allen as "the best comedy writer I ever knew", Larry Gelbart was a skilled humorist who had hits in the theatre, cinema and on television. He received both a Tony Award and an Emmy, and his Broadway show libretti included the boisterous and bawdy A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum (1962), the first Broadway show to have both words and music by Stephen Sondheim, based on the plays of Plautus, and the deliciously witty pastiche of film noir, City of Angels (1989). On screen, he won Oscar nominations for his scripting of the George Burns vehicle, Oh, God! (1977) and the hilarious gender-swapping tale Tootsie (1982).

The legacy of Leonard Bernstein

As the Southbank Centre prepares to celebrate the work of Leonard Bernstein, Boyd Tonkin reflects on the impression left by the composer – and recalls a memorable encounter with the great man himself

Bandslam (PG)

Remember the kind of films Cameron Crowe used to make, and the kind John Cusack used to star in?

Lost in the stars, Queen Elizabeth Hall, London

It is quite astonishing to look back and see what made the Broadway stage in the 1940s. It was a time of great daring and innovation when the boundaries between musical comedy and opera were less defined than they've ever been. Kurt Weill's final show for Broadway Lost in the Stars – his musical adaptation with Maxwell Anderson of Alan Paton's novel Cry, the Beloved Country – would be lucky to make off-Broadway today. And yet there it was – a deeply compassionate drama of division and reconciliation in apartheid South Africa playing the capriciously named "Great White Way" in an attempt to prick America's own racist conscience. And it took a Jewish refugee from Hitler's Germany to do it.

Weill/ Anderson Lost in the Stars, Queen Elizabeth Hall, London

It is quite astonishing to look back and see what made the Broadway stage in the 1940s.

Forgotten authors No. 34: John Collier

For those of a certain age, John Collier was simply "the window to watch", as the TV commercials for the menswear store proclaimed. The other John Collier is the English writer, born in 1901, who became famous for his wonderful short stories. Setting out to be a poet, Collier was disappointed with the result and instead produced a strange novel, His Monkey Wife, a satire about an explorer who marries a chimpanzee. Two more novels followed, now both forgotten, but around them formed a body of uniquely sardonic short stories, often written for The New Yorker magazine. They were collected in many volumes, one of which, Fancies and Goodnights, was reprinted in 2003.

Edward Seckerson: Finishing the Heats

For those less sad than I, the title is a pun on the Sondheim song "Finishing the Hat" from "Sunday in the Park with George - a song, a show, about the art of making art.

Parties: Everything but the ghoul

Somewhat fitting that after Maureen Lipman's character, Madame Armfeldt, dies peacefully at the end of the opening night of Trevor Nunn's West End production of Sondheim's A Little Night Music, guests should be transported to the 18th-century crypt of St Martin-in-the-Fields to kick off the after-party.

Album: Marianne Faithfull, Easy Come, Easy Go (Naive)

The grandé dame of postmodern torch songs is reunited here with US producer Hal Wilner and surrounded by choice players, from guitarists Marc Ribot and Barry Reynolds to Cat Power, Nick Cave and Keith Richards.

Awaking Beauty, Stephen Joseph Theatre, Scarborough; Great Expectations, Library Theatre, Manchester

Ayckbourn puts lust into his anti-fairy tale

A Little Night Music, Menier Chocolate Factory, London<br>The Family Reunion, Donmar Warehouse, London<br>In a Dark Dark House, Almeida, London

Sondheim's sex comedy with songs falls flat, and T S Eliot's verse play is bizarre. But Neil LaBute's study of child abuse hits home

A Little Night Music, Menier Chocolate Factory

Stephen Sondheim and Hugh Wheeler’s 1973 waltz musical is based on Ingmar Bergman’s Smiles of a Summer Night and as Trevor Nunn has already directed Bergman’s Scenes from a Marriage on the stage this year, he’s in the mood for a piece the composer described as whipped cream with knives. His intimate revival comes out of the mirrored mists of a country house estate where memories are rife and the moon smiles three times: for the young, the foolish and the old.

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