News Reforms are being demanded for the agency that buys British military kit

The Goverment contractors Serco and Capita are among businesses being wooed to salvage the Ministry of Defence's much-criticised reforms of the agency that buys military kit.

Villepin backs 'Karachigate' claims against Sarkozy

A full-blown state scandal, involving President Nicolas Sarkozy and other senior figures, threatens to explode this week over "Karachigate", the allegation that political corruption and revenge-taking in France led to the murder of 11 French submarine engineers in Pakistan in 2002.

Cameron condemns 'leaky' defence department

David Cameron slapped down his Defence Secretary Liam Fox yesterday for running a "leaky" department as the Government was embroiled in a "spin row" over its big cuts in defence spending.

Nuclear sub 'was using old charts'

A nuclear-powered submarine may have run aground on a shingle bank because the charts used by its crew were out of date.

Experts assess damage to grounded submarine

A nuclear-powered submarine which ran aground on a shingle bank, embarrassing the Royal Navy, will be checked for damage today.

Women crew to join submarines

The US Navy selected four submarines yesterday to carry the first women to serve aboard what had been the last class of American naval vessel off-limits to them.

Billion-pound nuclear sub meets its match – some Scottish rocks

HMS Astute had been billed as the stealthiest of underwater fighting machines; one the enemy would find virtually impossible to see and track.

Nuclear submarine pulled free

A nuclear-powered submarine which ran aground on a shingle bank earlier today has been towed free tonight, the Royal Navy said.

The Navy submarines left all at sea

Today the Royal Navy's nuclear-powered submarine HMS Astute ran aground on a shingle bank during sea trials. But it is not the first time a Royal Navy submarine has got into difficulties while at sea.

Alexander Ponomarev: Sea Stories, Calvert 22, London

The Russian former nautical engineer, submariner and merchant seaman Alexander Ponomarev currently has his first major exhibition in London, at Calvert 22, and it's more than apparent that, though he may have left the sea behind as a profession, it is still at the centre of his very being. Sea Stories begins with an installation that is a complex piece of mechanical engineering (Ponomarev apparently required the assistance of two scientists from MIT to install it). A large clear cylinder of water runs the length of the gallery; the submarine that hangs above it is lowered into the water, and it adapts and changes as it moves along the tube, stealthy as a shark. To say more about what happens would ruin any surprise, suffice to say that Ponomarev is interested in the difference between what is on the surface and what lies beneath.

Aircraft cuts will dent our plans, warns BAE

BAE Systems has warned that its growth in 2010 will be weaker than expected following the Government's review of defence and security spending. The company plans to work with the Ministry of Defence to address the implications of the changes, but said it anticipated some modest impact on the performance of its UK business this year. It has also reduced its financial planning assumptions for the following years.

Trident decision delayed until after the election

Arguments about the need to replace the Trident nuclear weapons system will continue to rage until the next general election after the Prime Minister announced a delay of at least six years.

Letters: Strategic Defence Review

The costs of British power

Alexander Ponomarev's Sea Stories - a preview

The first UK-based solo exhibition of work by Russian artist Alexander Ponomarev opens in London next week.

Britain and France may share nuclear deterrent

Joint submarine patrols were rejected by Brown before the election, but they are now seen as an answer to defence cuts
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Israel-Gaza conflict: No victory for Israel despite weeks of death and devastation

Robert Fisk: No victory for Israel despite weeks of devastation

Palestinians have won: they are still in Gaza, and Hamas is still there
Mary Beard writes character reference for Twitter troll who called her a 'slut'

Unlikely friends: Mary Beard and the troll who called her a ‘filthy old slut’

The Cambridge University classicist even wrote the student a character reference
America’s new apartheid: Prosperous white districts are choosing to break away from black cities and go it alone

America’s new apartheid

Prosperous white districts are choosing to break away from black cities and go it alone
Amazon is buying Twitch for £600m - but why do people want to watch others playing Xbox?

What is the appeal of Twitch?

Amazon is buying the video-game-themed online streaming site for £600m - but why do people want to watch others playing Xbox?
Tip-tapping typewriters, ripe pongs and slides in the office: Bosses are inventing surprising ways of making us work harder

How bosses are making us work harder

As it is revealed that one newspaper office pumps out the sound of typewriters to increase productivity, Gillian Orr explores the other devices designed to motivate staff
Manufacturers are struggling to keep up with the resurgence in vinyl records

Hard pressed: Resurgence in vinyl records

As the resurgence in vinyl records continues, manufacturers and their outdated machinery are struggling to keep up with the demand
Tony Jordan: 'I turned down the chance to research Charles Dickens for a TV series nine times ... then I found a kindred spirit'

A tale of two writers

Offered the chance to research Charles Dickens for a TV series, Tony Jordan turned it down. Nine times. The man behind EastEnders and Life on Mars didn’t feel right for the job. Finally, he gave in - and found an unexpected kindred spirit
Could a later start to the school day be the most useful educational reform of all?

Should pupils get a lie in?

Doctors want a later start to the school day so that pupils can sleep later. Not because teenagers are lazy, explains Simon Usborne - it's all down to their circadian rhythms
Prepare for Jewish jokes – as Jewish comedians get their own festival

Prepare for Jewish jokes...

... as Jewish comedians get their own festival
SJ Watson: 'I still can't quite believe that Before I Go to Sleep started in my head'

A dream come true for SJ Watson

Watson was working part time in the NHS when his debut novel, Before I Go to Sleep, became a bestseller. Now it's a Hollywood movie, too. Here he recalls the whirlwind journey from children’s ward to A-list film set
10 best cycling bags for commuters

10 best cycling bags for commuters

Gear up for next week’s National Cycle to Work day with one of these practical backpacks and messenger bags
Paul Scholes: Three at the back isn’t working yet but given time I’m hopeful Louis van Gaal can rebuild Manchester United

Paul Scholes column

Three at the back isn’t working yet but given time I’m hopeful Louis van Gaal can rebuild Manchester United
Kate Bush, Hammersmith Apollo music review: A preamble, then a coup de théâtre - and suddenly the long wait felt worth it

Kate Bush shows a voice untroubled by time

A preamble, then a coup de théâtre - and suddenly the long wait felt worth it
Robot sheepdog technology could be used to save people from burning buildings

The science of herding is cracked

Mathematical model would allow robots to be programmed to control crowds and save people from burning buildings
Tyrant: Is the world ready for a Middle Eastern 'Dallas'?

This tyrant doesn’t rule

It’s billed as a Middle Eastern ‘Dallas’, so why does Fox’s new drama have a white British star?