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London First is a body set up about 20 years ago by the London business community to promote the city as a place to do business and to lobby for the improvements – particularly to infrastructure – which everyone knows we urgently need but which government seems incapable of planning for.

Rain returning after brief respite

Britain's rain misery is set to return today with downpours and strong winds lashing the country at the end of the week.

Water companies lift hosepipe bans

Three of the UK's biggest water companies are lifting hosepipe bans, imposed to deal with drought, following weeks of heavy rain.

Thames Water boss Martin Baggs awarded large bonus

The boss of Thames Water has been awarded a bonus nearly equal to his annual salary after a year in which a hosepipe ban was announced and customer satisfaction "deteriorated".

Live travel news on the TFL site at 11am today

Continued Central line disruption fuels Olympic fears as commuters face severe delays on journey home

Continued disruption to Tube services today, that will see commuters face massive delays on their journey home, has fuelled fears that the 150-year-old system is unequal to the extra demand expected during the Olympics.

Hosepipe ban 'could be over before autumn'

The UK's biggest water company has said it could lift its hosepipe ban sooner than expected after wet weather reduced the risk of drought.

Record April showers end drought in 19 counties

The hosepipe bans have not been lifted just yet, but river levels are returning to normal

The much needed rain looks set to continue over the weekend, and comes amid a drought and hosepipe ban in most of the South and East of England.

Drought hits half of UK and water shortages may last to Christmas

Half of Britain is now officially in drought, in the worst national water shortage since 1976 – a situation that may last until Christmas or beyond.

Drought-hit water firm may buy in supplies

The hosepipe ban has put certain water firms under such pressure that at least one is considering deals with other companies across the country.

Irene Upton, a keen gardener, lives in Oare and is supplied by Wessex Water, which does not have a ban

Middle England goes green with hosepipe envy

Not much happens in Manton, a tiny village in the Wiltshire countryside. Its residents enthuse about horse-racing – after all, some of Britain's best stallions are housed in stables there. The villagers also enjoy gardening. The place is full of greenery and, on a cold afternoon yesterday, some homeowners were admiring the fruits of their labour.

The hosepipe ban will be 'self-policing' but penalties can still be enforced underlaw

Get ready for along, dry summer

With hosepipes banned in some areas, a lack of water could impact us all. By Charlie Cooper

The hosepipe ban will be 'self-policing' but penalties can still be enforced underlaw

Roll up your hosepipes for the big turn-off

There may be blizzards in the north, but much of the UK is so gripped by drought that, from today, millions of people will be subject to draconian restrictions on their use of water

Highest water bills set to be cut by £50

Britain's highest water bills are set to be cut by £50 a year after a £400 million handout to a private company cleared Parliament tonight.

'Dry winters' lead to hosepipe ban

Millions of households will have hosepipe bans by Easter, water firms announced today as the Environment Agency warned of "severe drought" in the coming months.

'Crippling drought' hits south and east of England

Hosepipe bans and rising food prices are set to hit millions of Britons after the Government raised the prospect of a spring and summer drought across a swathe of England following one of the driest winters on record.

Bewl Water Reservoir in Kent is now only 41 per cent full

Water, water... nowhere

Parts of Britain are already drier than they were in the infamous summer of 1976. Cahal Milmo reports

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