Tiananmen Square

Art Since 1989: The dawn of a new cultural epoch

At the end of the Eighties, the world was convulsed by revolutions in politics, science and technology - and with them, old notions of art became redundant. In a new book, Kelly Grovier explains how anything goes now - and why it should

Father of Tiananmen massacre victim kills himself

The father of a young protester who was killed during the crackdown on the 1989 pro-democracy demonstrations in Tiananmen Square has hanged himself after more than 20 years of seeking justice for his son, a human rights group said yesterday.

Philip Hensher: Sergei Polunin and a lesson for Labour

I wouldn't be surprised if Monica Mason, the director of the Royal Ballet, was feeling pretty furious the last couple of days. Her young star, Sergei Polunin, walked away from the company two days ago without a word. There had been no particular sign, apparently, that he was unhappy or thinking of leaving; there were no negotiations that had broken down.

As West woos China, no word about missing rights activist

When the Chancellor, George Osborne, and Michael Bear, the Lord Mayor of the City of London, co-hosted visiting Chinese Vice Premier Li Keqiang at a cosy dinner at Mansion House on Monday, it is a fair bet that the extra-judicial torture of the man formerly on China's official list of its 10 best lawyers was not among the topics discussed.

Brian Hanrahan: BBC correspondent best remembered for his dispatches

Brian Hanrahan was a leading BBC foreign correspondent for over 20 years and witnessed and reported on many of the world’s major events in recent times. Notably, the assassination of Indira Gandhi in India, the rise of Mikhail Gorbachev in the Soviet Union, the 1989 Tiananmen Square protests in China, the fall of the Berlin Wall as well as conflicts in Bosnia and Kosovo. He was, however, catapulted into the nation’s consciousness for his famed coverage of the 1982 Falklands War.

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Vigil for victims of Tiananmen Square in Hong Kong

Peace activists gather in Hong Kong yesterday to mark the 21st anniversary of China's crackdown on pro-democracy demonstrations, which culminated in the deaths of hundreds of workers and students in and around Beijing's Tiananmen Square.

The Big Question: Is Google right to abandon its search engine in

This week Google carried out its threat to abandon its Chinese-language search engine in China, google.cn, transferring it instead to Hong Kong, which is a Special Administrative Region of China since the handover in 1997 and does not have to obey Chinese censorship rules. Predictably, mainland Chinese users are not able to access the site easily.