Arts and Entertainment

Some authors vanish in plain sight, recalled by their most successful work, which comes to define an entire career. A friend of mine has written mytho-logies, Victoriana, crime and magical realism, but publishers are unable to mention her without inserting the title of her greatest success into her name, in the way that pantomime stars are bracketed by their TV shows. Typecasting is a problem that afflicts most successful writers.

Wakehurst Place: Kew's country cousin is as accessible as tricky terrains come

"Ahh, I long to have flowerbeds neatly mulched like this," says my godmother, covetously, eyeing up the azaleas. We are at Wakehurst Place in Haywards Heath, Sussex, admiring the neatly kept gardens, now all kitted out for summer. We've wandered through the bluebell woods, admired the long views to distant birch plantations, and done the sums on a June wedding hosted in the Elizabethan mansion. And it's not even lunchtime.

The Blagger's Guide To...The Return Of The Essay

'The perfect size and shape for brilliant ideas'

Nixon pulls out of Simonseeks

Simon Nixon, the entrepreneur behind Moneysupermarket.com, has walked away from his online travel venture after two years saying the business model was "simply not viable".

Budding photographers: Snap to it

This is your chance to win a classic Olympus camera and a travel guide commission worth £3,000

A prize-winner's tale about the giants of Malta

Marie Kreft, who won our travel-writing competition in 2010, follows a history trail

Rules for The Independent on Sunday / Bradt travel-writing competition 2011

1. By entering the competition you agree to be bound by these rules.The Independent’s standard competition rules (located at http://www.independent.co.uk/service/independent-competition-rules-759575.html) also apply.

A no-longer lonely planet comes to Britain

Gowalla, a social networking site based on where you know as well as who you know, is set to become the latest social media site to open an office in the UK. It comes as the company sets its sights on doubling the size of its operations this year and reshaping itself as a "social Lonely Planet".

The land of junk food and celebs

England is a nation of celebrity-obsessed junk food addicts, according to the latest Lonely Planet travel guide. It describes the British economy as "looking dicey" and said there may be "choppy waters ahead".

Album: Various artists, The Rough Guide to Bellydance (World Music Network)

With feminist groups in Europe and America now espousing it, this really is a danse sans frontières.

BBC takes full control of Lonely Planet

BBC Worldwide has taken full control of Lonely Planet, buying the remaining 25 per cent from its founders, Tony and Maureen Wheeler, for £42.1m.

Romantic Moderns, By Alexandra Harris<br />Britten, By John Bridcut

Sometime in the early 1960s, not too long after its consecration, I remember taking a coach trip with my mother to see the rebuilt Coventry Cathedral. It hardly needs a hotshot psychologist to spot why a whole day of his mother's undivided attention should leave such an indelible trace on a small child with three brothers (how did she find the time?). Whatever the motive, that day remains my earliest memory of intense aesthetic pleasure: Basil Spence's light-filled, sandstone-walled interiors; the blazing stained-glass windows of John Piper; Graham Sutherland's imperious tapestry; Elizabeth Frink and Jacob Epstein's massy, muscular sculptures.

Where the weird things are: Meet the pangolin, the mammal that thinks it's a reptile

A 15kg walking artichoke? A metre-long ant-eating pine cone? Even though the pangolin is fairly widespread in savannah woodland right across sub-Saharan Africa, it's hard to describe in animal terms. For a start, this bizarre mammal is the only warm-blooded creature on the planet that is completely covered in scales.

The world in award-winning images: The Insight / IoS Travel Photography Competition

BA steward Steve McDonald will see more than airports with his first prize: a &#163;3,000 commission from Insight
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine