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Travel Guides

Reflections on a journey

A road trip along the shore of Lake Michigan reveals a world of beauty, says Chris Leadbeater

Where to go in 2013

Made your holiday plans for next year yet? In these exclusive extracts from Lonely Planet's new 'Best in Travel' we reveal 10 destinations that should be on your wish list

Jane Bell: Hotelier who established Druidstone as a force in Welsh

Jane Bell did not seek acclaim for Druidstone, the idiosyncratic hotel she developed on a clifftop at the sea's edge in Pembrokeshire and to which there are still no signposts. But it came anyway, in the words of the many writers who have stumbled upon it across the course of 40 years.

Writing competition update: Win a trip for two to Italy – plus have

The Independent on Sunday has once again joined forces with Bradt Travel Guides (bradtguides.com) to offer readers the chance to win our travel-writing competition, with a top prize this year of a holiday for two to Abruzzo in Italy and publication of the winning entry in the travel section of the paper.

The 12 most-read 2011 articles in Travel

From Spanish airport strikes to naked German spas, Steve Anderson runs down the most popular articles published in 2011, as well as a few editors' favourites

Inside travel: Guidebooks

<b>Andrew Steed</b> reflects on how guidebooks and maps have changed since he started selling them

More headlines

Romantic Moderns, By Alexandra Harris
Britten, By John Bridcut

Sometime in the early 1960s, not too long after its consecration, I remember taking a coach trip with my mother to see the rebuilt Coventry Cathedral. It hardly needs a hotshot psychologist to spot why a whole day of his mother's undivided attention should leave such an indelible trace on a small child with three brothers (how did she find the time?). Whatever the motive, that day remains my earliest memory of intense aesthetic pleasure: Basil Spence's light-filled, sandstone-walled interiors; the blazing stained-glass windows of John Piper; Graham Sutherland's imperious tapestry; Elizabeth Frink and Jacob Epstein's massy, muscular sculptures.

Where the weird things are: Meet the pangolin, the mammal that thinks

A 15kg walking artichoke? A metre-long ant-eating pine cone? Even though the pangolin is fairly widespread in savannah woodland right across sub-Saharan Africa, it's hard to describe in animal terms. For a start, this bizarre mammal is the only warm-blooded creature on the planet that is completely covered in scales.