News Libyans carry the coffin of a person killed in Friday's demonstration during a funeral procession for the dead in Tripoli on Saturday

Fighting comes day after attack on protesters left over 40 dead in Libyan capital

Tripoli's secretive rebels lose faith in battle with Gaddafi

Over coffee in his apartment in a quiet residential suburb of Tripoli, the Libyan activist in his fifties willing the downfall of Muammar Gaddafi is wondering aloud about whether he should try to leave the country for a while.

Regime has harassed and beaten me, says rape victim

Iman al Obeidi, the woman who burst into a Tripoli hotel ten days ago claiming that she had been raped by men loyal to Muammar Gaddafi, said yesterday that she had since been harassed and beaten several times by plain clothes police.

Donald Macintyre: Western leaders looking for an exit should be wary of the obvious quick fix

Analysis: A further obstacle is the role that Saif has played. His public appearances have hardly been those of a statesman

'You have to be crazy to understand Gaddafi – because he's so crazy...'

He sauntered up to the Tripoli landmark where we had arranged to meet and said, smiling: "I think you're probably looking for me."

John Lichfield: Love and other bombshells

Here is a literary conundrum. A legendary, best-selling French novel, written 60 years ago, has just been published in France for the first time. How can that be? It is a long and fascinating story in which I claim a tiny, walk-on part. More glamorously, there is also a story within the story: the first account of the final love affair of a doomed, British screen idol of the 1930s and 1940s, Leslie Howard. The book in question has never previously appeared in France because its French author thought that it was too naughty for the French. More exactly, Tereska Torres feared that its descriptions of the heterosexual and homosexual love lives of French women soldiers in London during the Blitz might cause offence.

Rupert Cornwell: Cold War rules still apply in tricky game of switching sides

Their most recent heyday was the Cold War. But defectors have been around as long as states have been fighting each other. Think, for example, Benedict Arnold or Rudolf Hess. Now this eclectic company has been joined by Moussa Koussa, until lately foreign minister of Libya, and now a guest at a "secret undisclosed location" of Her Majesty's Government.

Britain in talks with 10 more Gaddafi aides

Inner circle turn their backs on besieged Libyan dictator

From Tripoli to Surrey – the long escape route from Gaddafi's regime

Koussa's rift with inner circle may have begun when leader's son hit him last year

Five Libyan diplomats expelled over Gaddafi links

The Government has expelled five diplomats from the Libyan embassy in London because they "could pose a threat" to national security.

Rebels concede Tripoli may be out of reach after 100-mile retreat

Regime beats back advance and tries to exploit West's fears of al-Qa'ida gaining power

Libyan woman claiming rape will face charges

A Libyan woman who burst into a Tripoli hotel to tell foreign journalists how she was gang raped by Muammar Gaddafi's troops will face criminal charges, a government spokesman said today.

Rape claimant 'held in leader's compound'

The parents of a woman dragged by security men from a Tripoli hotel after alleging she had been raped by militiamen loyal to Muammar Gaddafi claimed yesterday that she was being held hostage in the Libyan leader's compound. The mother of Eman al-Obaidi received a call yesterday from an unidentified person purportedly representing the regime, the parents told Al Jazeera.

Rebels hope tribal rifts will speed their march to Gaddafi's birthplace

Loyalists offer little resistance ahead of battle for Sirte. <b>Kim Sengupta </b>joins the advancing forces.

Simon Carr: Spit it out, Yvette. It's meant to be an Urgent Question

Sketch: David Davis praised the police as having upped their game since the G20 demos &ndash; fair play, they didn't actually kill anyone

One by one, the milestones on the road to Tripoli are falling

As Gaddafi's forces melt away, rebel eyes turn to the Libyan capital
Latest stories from i100
SPONSORED FEATURES
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Turkey-Kurdish conflict: Obama's deal with Ankara is a betrayal of Syrian Kurds and may not even weaken Isis

US betrayal of old ally brings limited reward

Since the accord, the Turks have only waged war on Kurds while no US bomber has used Incirlik airbase, says Patrick Cockburn
VIPs gather for opening of second Suez Canal - but doubts linger over security

'A gift from Egypt to the rest of the world'

VIPs gather for opening of second Suez Canal - but is it really needed?
Jeremy Corbyn dresses abysmally. That's a great thing because it's genuine

Jeremy Corbyn dresses abysmally. That's a great thing because it's genuine

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, applauds a man who clearly has more important things on his mind
The male menopause and intimations of mortality

Aches, pains and an inkling of mortality

So the male menopause is real, they say, but what would the Victorians, 'old' at 30, think of that, asks DJ Taylor
Man Booker Prize 2015: Anna Smaill - How can I possibly be on the list with these writers I have idolised?

'How can I possibly be on the list with these writers I have idolised?'

Man Booker Prize nominee Anna Smaill on the rise of Kiwi lit
Bettany Hughes interview: The historian on how Socrates would have solved Greece's problems

Bettany Hughes interview

The historian on how Socrates would have solved Greece's problems
Art of the state: Pyongyang propaganda posters to be exhibited in China

Art of the state

Pyongyang propaganda posters to be exhibited in China
Mildreds and Vanilla Black have given vegetarian food a makeover in new cookbooks

Vegetarian food gets a makeover

Long-time vegetarian Holly Williams tries to recreate some of the inventive recipes in Mildreds and Vanilla Black's new cookbooks
The haunting of Shirley Jackson: Was the gothic author's life really as bleak as her fiction?

The haunting of Shirley Jackson

Was the gothic author's life really as bleak as her fiction?
Bill Granger recipes: Heading off on holiday? Try out our chef's seaside-inspired dishes...

Bill Granger's seaside-inspired recipes

These dishes are so easy to make, our chef is almost embarrassed to call them recipes
Ashes 2015: Tourists are limp, leaderless and distinctly UnAustralian

Tourists are limp, leaderless and distinctly UnAustralian

A woefully out-of-form Michael Clarke embodies his team's fragile Ashes campaign, says Michael Calvin
Blairites be warned, this could be the moment Labour turns into Syriza

Andrew Grice: Inside Westminster

Blairites be warned, this could be the moment Labour turns into Syriza
HMS Victory: The mystery of Britain's worst naval disaster is finally solved - 271 years later

The mystery of Britain's worst naval disaster is finally solved - 271 years later

Exclusive: David Keys reveals the research that finally explains why HMS Victory went down with the loss of 1,100 lives
Survivors of the Nagasaki atomic bomb attack: Japan must not abandon its post-war pacifism

'I saw people so injured you couldn't tell if they were dead or alive'

Nagasaki survivors on why Japan must not abandon its post-war pacifism
Jon Stewart: The voice of Democrats who felt Obama had failed to deliver on his 'Yes We Can' slogan, and the voter he tried hardest to keep onside

The voter Obama tried hardest to keep onside

Outgoing The Daily Show host, Jon Stewart, became the voice of Democrats who felt the President had failed to deliver on his ‘Yes We Can’ slogan. Tim Walker charts the ups and downs of their 10-year relationship on screen