Voices

More than a million child refugees are struggling to cope

Picture story: Saving India's poorest babies

In India more people live in poverty than in the whole of Africa. It is a region where the most vulnerable women, babies and children are hit the hardest. 

Unicef says urban children in developing world need urgent attention

On another beach in a different world, Chinasa Paul would be sipping a soft drink bought by his parents. But if the 15-year-old eats today in Lagos, it will be thanks to tips he receives for lugging crates of drinks up and down Kuramo Beach.

UN: £220m more needed to help those on Kenya's 'roads of death'

An extra $360m (£220m) is urgently needed to tackle the food crisis in Somalia and across east Africa, the World Food Programme said yesterday, as aid agencies dubbed the routes to Kenya's refugee camps "roads of death" thanks to the numbers dying on the way.

Response to appeal so far is derisory, says minister

Charities and ministers issued urgent appeals for donations yesterday to the Somalia famine appeal.

Famine victims to get UN aid as Somali militia backs down

The United Nations has resumed aid deliveries into Islamist-controlled Somalia in an effort to stem the daily tide of 3,500 famine refugees pouring into neighbouring countries.

Profit, not care: The ugly side of overseas adoptions

Lax regulation and an endless demand by childless couples in the West has created an often exploitative market in babies born in the developing world

£81,000 for Beatrice's wedding hat

The hat worn by Princess Beatrice to the royal wedding has raised £81,100 for charity in an online auction.

Rise in climate change disasters

Climate change is increasing the number of disasters which hit children in poor countries, campaigners have warned.

Cambodia's orphanages target the wallets of well-meaning tourists

The Cambodian government has started inspecting more than 250 orphanages after it was revealed that most of the country's 12,000 orphans have at least one living parent. The government said that until the assessment is completed, it had no idea whether the children were being cared for properly.

Barcelona ditch Unicef for huge sponsorship deal

Barcelona today announced the most lucrative shirt sponsorship deal in football history - worth 150 million euros (£125million) with the Qatar Foundation.

Leading article: Money alone may not end child poverty in Britain

The Honourable Member of Parliament for Birkenhead has never sat very comfortably in his own party. Tony Blair appointed him welfare reform minister and asked him to think the unthinkable, then sacked him a year later for doing precisely that. More than a decade on, Frank Field received a similar brief, this time outside the Government, from a Conservative Prime Minister. The fruits of his labours were published yesterday in a report entitled The Foundation Years: Preventing Poor Children Becoming Poor Adults; his conclusions made characteristically awkward reading.

Leading headmistress: 'Education has lost its way'

The UK's education system has "lost its way", a leading headmistress said today.

Ferguson ducks the issue with the R-word off limits

It was a little like being told not to mention the war to the "typical Germans" as Sir Alex Ferguson faced the press yesterday with the subject of Wayne Rooney strictly off limits. Hours after reports began circulating that Rooney could leave Old Trafford as soon as January after telling the club he does not want to extend his contract beyond the end of next season, Ferguson was scheduled to appear at the announcement of a new scheme with Unicef.

Mine clearance projects axed as coalition cuts funds

Life-saving efforts by Princess Diana's favourite charity threatened in five war-torn countries.

Leading article: Still relevant in a globalising world

The Queen, of all people, understands the value of a good institution. Today, at the General Assembly of the United Nations, she will address a body which is, like the monarchy itself, a much-criticised foundation. And indeed much of what it has done – since it was founded in 1945 after the Second World War ended to provide a platform for dialogue to prevent future wars – has been worthy of criticism. It has had big failings, like deciding not to intervene in the genocide in Rwanda in 1994, and small ones, like being bureaucratic and wasteful. But it has had huge successes too, in peace-keeping, in international justice through its court in The Hague and in working for the poor through UNICEF, the World Food Programme and its other arms.

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Isis hostage crisis: The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power

Isis hostage crisis

The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power, says Robert Fisk
Missing salvage expert who found $50m of sunken treasure before disappearing, tracked down at last

The runaway buccaneers and the ship full of gold

Salvage expert Tommy Thompson found sunken treasure worth millions. Then he vanished... until now
Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Maverick artist Grayson Perry backs our campaign
Assisted Dying Bill: I want to be able to decide about my own death - I want to have control of my life

Assisted Dying Bill: 'I want control of my life'

This week the Assisted Dying Bill is debated in the Lords. Virginia Ironside, who has already made plans for her own self-deliverance, argues that it's time we allowed people a humane, compassionate death
Move over, kale - cabbage is the new rising star

Cabbage is king again

Sophie Morris banishes thoughts of soggy school dinners and turns over a new leaf
11 best winter skin treats

Give your moisturiser a helping hand: 11 best winter skin treats

Get an extra boost of nourishment from one of these hard-working products
Paul Scholes column: The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him

Paul Scholes column

The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him
Frank Warren column: No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans

Frank Warren's Ringside

No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee