News Carl Lewis has accused Chris Christie of intimidation

Chris Christie, the embattled governor of New Jersey whose hopes for presidential nomination have been hit by revelations of alleged politically-motivated lane closures and misspending of federal aid, was dealt a new blow last night after the former Olympic sprint and long jump champion Carl Lewis accused him of “intimidation”.

Supporters of the Affordable Healthcare Act hold posters critical of the Tea Party

Obama considers Republican deal to extend borrowing power and resolve shutdown

Some federal services to reopen as moderates appear to gain upper hand over Tea Party

John Boehner asked Republicans to follow him in allowing a short-term increase in the debt ceiling

No deal: Republicans and White House fail to reach agreement on short-term debt-ceiling extension

Failure of House speaker John Boehner's proposal to extend America’s borrowing means government shutdown continues

Christie came close to entering the ring in 2012

'I can walk and chew bubble-gum at the same time': Governor of New Jersey, Chris Christie, drops big hint that he will run for US presidency

His remarks, made during a debate with his Democrat challenger for the governorship, were the clearest signal yet that he will seek the Republican Presidential nomination in 2016

Barack Obama and John McCain make one of their final campaign appearances

Barack Obama and the Republican Party are engaged in an existential battle

No winner can come out of this stalemate with their head held high

Republican house speaker, John Boehner, has sought put the blame on President Barack Obama

No end in sight to US shutdown as John Boehner blames President Barack Obama for stand-off

Almost a week into America’s government shutdown, positions seemed only to harden on Sunday as the Republican house speaker, John Boehner, refused to rule out the stand-off over the federal budget spilling over into negotiations on the debt ceiling, again raising the spectre of America defaulting on its debt.

Static states: Federal workers protest at the shutdown, at the Capitol

Obamacare begins – and the right is terrified that it will work

Out of America: While all the talk is of shutdown, schemes for those without health cover open for business

John Boehner: The Republican House Speaker is expected to seek a deal on the debt ceiling

'This isn't some damn game': Tempers fray in US enters fifth day of government shutdown

Republicans and Democrats continue to blame each other as shutdown crisis worsens

Capitol Hill lockdown: Police shoot and kill female driver who refused to stop close to White House

Young child that was a passenger in the car uninjured, say officials

Q&A: Resolving the US shutdown

Resolving the shutdown is important, for the longer it drags on, the greater the risk to the US economy, which remains weak. A drawn-out squabble over a stopgap budget would hit consumer spending, for example, as the furloughed federal workers tighten their belts. But in the short term, attention is turning to the debt ceiling because the federal government will hit its Congressionally mandated borrowing limit no later than 17 October.

Obama spoke to construction workers in Maryland about the crisis

US shutdown: Barack Obama cancels Asia tour as political deadlock continues

President refuses to give in to Republican demands over heath-care reform, with decision to skip economic summits an indication that no resolution is likely to come soon

Government union workers demonstrate on the side of Constitution Avenue

US shutdown and looming debt crisis talks between President Obama and Congressional leaders fail to break the policy deadlock

Two issues become entangled as intelligence officials warned the situation 'seriously damages' their ability to protect the country

National parks, such as the Grand Canyon in Colorado, and refuse services, have been shut down

Q&A: US shutdown - all you need to know about the crisis in America

Not all government functions will simply evaporate — Social Security cheques will still get mailed, and hospitals will stay open. But many federal agencies will send their employees home, from the Environmental Protection Agency to hundreds of national parks. Here’s a look at how a shutdown will work.

Conservative Party conference: David Cameron defends Tory plan for more seven years of austerity

Billions more to be cut from welfare cash before 2020 in pledge for surplus

The entry to the Jefferson Memorial is closed off in Washington

US shutdown: President Obama vows not to give in to 'ideological crusade' as budget impasse forces 800,000 people off work

Republicans and Democrats have failed to agree the budget for federal agencies, forcing non-essential workers on unpaid leave

Shutdown looms for US government as Republicans seek to derail Obama's healthcare bill by stripping funding

If Congress cannot agree on a spending bill by Tuesday the government will run out of money for non-essential services

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