News In fact, the actor went as far as to threaten the One Direction star live on television, telling host Conan O’Brien: “That little prick’s gonna get it.”

The actor threatened the One Direction star live on television, telling host Conan O’Brien that he wanted to "beat the c**p of him" in a video

Spielberg creates his biggest monster to date

"Something has survived" screams the promotional slogan from hamburger boxes and the sides of almost every bus in the land. It sure has. Four years after the United States surrendered itself to dinosaur fever with the release of Steven Spielberg's Jurassic Park, it is doing him the same favour all over again.

The oasis where life's a blur

The House of Sleep by Jonathan Coe, Viking, pounds 16.99; Simon Louvish goes to slumberland and explores the modern English soul

Channel 5 pays pounds 88m for films

Channel 5, committed to screening a feature film every night, splashed out pounds 88m yesterday for two years' worth of Warner Brothers' forthcoming productions - almost as much as its entire first year programming budget.

Rank tipped for Tussauds bid

Rank is believed to be casting an acquisitive eye over the Tussauds Group, the subsidiary of media conglomerate Pearson, writes Richard Halstead.

Obituary: Don Porter

The villain of Robert Redford's trenchant film The Candidate (1972) was Crocker Jarmon, a ruthless, corrupt, United States senator, who, in a memorable scene, stirred his supporters with a speech in which he feigned sincerity with practised conviction. "The actor giving a beautiful performance of Jarmon giving a beautiful performance," wrote John Coleman in the New Statesman, "turns out to be a sound bit-player, Don Porter, a vaguely familiar face from other movies, but one I would have been hard put to give a name to." At the time he made The Candidate, Porter was a veteran of more than two dozen films, some 200 plays and countless television shows.

It can be done: fun for the kids and peace for you

To many parents a family holiday is a contradiction in terms. But, as Penelope Gibbs discovered, hotels here are trying to remedy this. And it's working

Composing in reel time

The BBC's 'Sound on Film' strand returns to the small screen tomorrow, its aim to re-establish the collaboration between music- and image-makers that characterised cinema's early days. Michael Church assesses the project and charts the highs and lows of film-music's first 70 years

Daddy, you hardly knew me

Michael Redgrave never expected much from his daughter Lynn. In his eyes, her sister, Vanessa, and brother, Corin, were the stars. Only now is Lynn exorcising that painful verdict.

Rise of a Rank outsider

The leisure group's concrete classicist should win over the shareholder s, says Richard Halstead; profile; Andrew Teare

Books: The Puccini of cinema grows up

Is he the architect of emotional cathedrals, a visionary technophile exploring the eternal verities? Or is he a saccharined philistine, peddling comic-strip sentimentality? J.G. Ballard, a one-time collaborator, defends the reputation of Steven Spielberg

Rank pays $410m for Hard Rock rights

Peter Morton, one of the co-founders of the Hard Rock cafe chain, and his partners yesterday landed a $410m (pounds 266m) windfall after Rank announced a deal to buy out the remaining world-wide rights in the business.

Those disturbed souls who so identify with the railway life that they desire to acquire the accoutrements may obtain BR caps for pounds 5 and whistles for pounds 4.50

Why all the fuss about the great British Rail sell-off? It's been going on for years. I realised this when I saw signs from two of my local stations, West Dulwich and Beckenham Junction, lending an exotic touch to the restaurant of Universal Studios in Los Angeles. It turns out that BR has been raking in a handsome income from its ephemera shop, Collector's Corner, located near Euston Station, since 1969. Choo-choo buffs are willing to pay such extortionate prices for almost any particle of railway junk that I'm somewhat surprised our car-besotted government hasn't sawn up the whole network and flogged it off by the foot.

The afterlife of Dennis Potter

When Britain's greatest TV writer died in 1994, he left behind two last works and some extraordinary instructions. Robin Buss reports

Weeping Brando apologises to Jews

Los Angeles (Reuter) - The actor Marlon Brando, who sparked a storm of criticism for saying Hollywood was run by Jews, broke down and wept yesterday when he met Jewish leaders to apologise for his comments.

Tinseltown in search of lost lustre

The boulevard of broken dreams is closed to traffic. Workers on Los Angeles' multi-billion dollar and much-maligned new subway system tunnelling beneath Hollywood Boulevard, have been stalled by a series of sinkholes.
Voices
A Russian hunter at the Medved bear-hunting lodge in Siberia
Save the tigerWildlife charities turn to those who kill animals to help save them
News
Davis says: 'My career has been about filling a niche - there were fewer short actors and fewer roles – but now I'm being offered all kinds of things'
PeopleWarwick Davis on Ricky Gervais, Harry Potter and his perfect role
News
i100
Sport
Frank Lampard will pass Billy Wright and equal Bobby Charton’s caps tally of 106 caps against
sportFormer Chelsea midfielder in Etihad stopgap before New York contract
Arts and Entertainment
The first film introduced Daniel Radcliffe to our screens, pictured here as he prepares to board the train to Hogwarts for the first time.
booksHow reading Harry Potter helps children grow up to be gay-friendly
Arts and Entertainment
A scene from Aladdin is performed at the Tony Awards in New York in June
theatreBrit producer Lythgoe makes kids' musical comedy a Los Angeles hit
Sport
Usain Bolt of Jamaica smiles and shakes hands with a competitor after Jamaica won their first heat in the men's 4x100m relay
sport
News
Chancellor George Osborne, along with the Prime Minister, have been 'complacently claiming the economy is now fixed', according to shadow Chancellor Ed Balls
i100... which is awkward, because he is their boss, after all
Life and Style
A small bag of the drug Ecstasy
Health
Life and Style
Floral-print swim shorts, £26, by Topman, topman.com; sunglasses, £215, by Paul Smith, mpaulsmith.co.uk
FashionBag yourself the perfect pair
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Save the Tiger: Meet the hunters tasked with protecting Russia's rare Amur tiger

Hunters protect Russia's rare Amur tiger

In an unusual move, wildlife charities have enlisted those who kill animals to help save them. Oliver Poole travels to Siberia to investigate
Transfers: How has your club fared in summer sales?

How has your club fared in summer sales?

Who have bagged the bargain buys and who have landed the giant turkeys
Warwick Davis: The British actor on Ricky Gervais, how the Harry Potter set became his office, and why he'd like to play a spy

'I'm a realist; I know how hard this business is'

Warwick Davis on Ricky Gervais, Harry Potter and his perfect role
The best swim shorts for men: Bag yourself the perfect pair and make a splash this summer

The best swim shorts for men

Bag yourself the perfect pair and make a splash this summer
Has Ukip’s Glastonbury branch really been possessed by the devil?

Has Ukip’s Glastonbury branch really been possessed by the devil?

Meet the couple blamed for bringing Lucifer into local politics
Dress the Gaza situation up all you like, but the truth hurts

Robert Fisk on Gaza conflict

Dress the situation up all you like, but the truth hurts
Save the tiger: Tiger, tiger burning less brightly as numbers plummet

Tiger, tiger burning less brightly

When William Blake wrote his famous poem there were probably more than 100,000 tigers in the wild. These days they probably number around 3,200
5 News's Andy Bell retraces his grandfather's steps on the First World War battlefields

In grandfather's footsteps

5 News's political editor Andy Bell only knows his grandfather from the compelling diary he kept during WWI. But when he returned to the killing fields where Edwin Vaughan suffered so much, his ancestor came to life
Lifestyle guru Martha Stewart reveals she has flying robot ... to take photos of her farm

Martha Stewart has flying robot

The lifestyle guru used the drone to get a bird's eye view her 153-acre farm in Bedford, New York
Former Labour minister Meg Hillier has demanded 'pootling lanes' for women cyclists

Do women cyclists need 'pootling lanes'?

Simon Usborne (who's more of a hurtler) explains why winning the space race is key to happy riding
A tale of two presidents: George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story

A tale of two presidents

George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story
Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover

The dining car makes a comeback

Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover
Gallery rage: How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?

Gallery rage

How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?
Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players

Eye on the prize

Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players
Women's rugby: Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup

Women's rugby

Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup