News In fact, the actor went as far as to threaten the One Direction star live on television, telling host Conan O’Brien: “That little prick’s gonna get it.”

The actor threatened the One Direction star live on television, telling host Conan O’Brien that he wanted to "beat the c**p of him" in a video

Spielberg creates his biggest monster to date

"Something has survived" screams the promotional slogan from hamburger boxes and the sides of almost every bus in the land. It sure has. Four years after the United States surrendered itself to dinosaur fever with the release of Steven Spielberg's Jurassic Park, it is doing him the same favour all over again.

The oasis where life's a blur

The House of Sleep by Jonathan Coe, Viking, pounds 16.99; Simon Louvish goes to slumberland and explores the modern English soul

Channel 5 pays pounds 88m for films

Channel 5, committed to screening a feature film every night, splashed out pounds 88m yesterday for two years' worth of Warner Brothers' forthcoming productions - almost as much as its entire first year programming budget.

Rank tipped for Tussauds bid

Rank is believed to be casting an acquisitive eye over the Tussauds Group, the subsidiary of media conglomerate Pearson, writes Richard Halstead.

Obituary: Don Porter

The villain of Robert Redford's trenchant film The Candidate (1972) was Crocker Jarmon, a ruthless, corrupt, United States senator, who, in a memorable scene, stirred his supporters with a speech in which he feigned sincerity with practised conviction. "The actor giving a beautiful performance of Jarmon giving a beautiful performance," wrote John Coleman in the New Statesman, "turns out to be a sound bit-player, Don Porter, a vaguely familiar face from other movies, but one I would have been hard put to give a name to." At the time he made The Candidate, Porter was a veteran of more than two dozen films, some 200 plays and countless television shows.

It can be done: fun for the kids and peace for you

To many parents a family holiday is a contradiction in terms. But, as Penelope Gibbs discovered, hotels here are trying to remedy this. And it's working

Composing in reel time

The BBC's 'Sound on Film' strand returns to the small screen tomorrow, its aim to re-establish the collaboration between music- and image-makers that characterised cinema's early days. Michael Church assesses the project and charts the highs and lows of film-music's first 70 years

Daddy, you hardly knew me

Michael Redgrave never expected much from his daughter Lynn. In his eyes, her sister, Vanessa, and brother, Corin, were the stars. Only now is Lynn exorcising that painful verdict.

Rise of a Rank outsider

The leisure group's concrete classicist should win over the shareholder s, says Richard Halstead; profile; Andrew Teare

Books: The Puccini of cinema grows up

Is he the architect of emotional cathedrals, a visionary technophile exploring the eternal verities? Or is he a saccharined philistine, peddling comic-strip sentimentality? J.G. Ballard, a one-time collaborator, defends the reputation of Steven Spielberg

Rank pays $410m for Hard Rock rights

Peter Morton, one of the co-founders of the Hard Rock cafe chain, and his partners yesterday landed a $410m (pounds 266m) windfall after Rank announced a deal to buy out the remaining world-wide rights in the business.

Those disturbed souls who so identify with the railway life that they desire to acquire the accoutrements may obtain BR caps for pounds 5 and whistles for pounds 4.50

Why all the fuss about the great British Rail sell-off? It's been going on for years. I realised this when I saw signs from two of my local stations, West Dulwich and Beckenham Junction, lending an exotic touch to the restaurant of Universal Studios in Los Angeles. It turns out that BR has been raking in a handsome income from its ephemera shop, Collector's Corner, located near Euston Station, since 1969. Choo-choo buffs are willing to pay such extortionate prices for almost any particle of railway junk that I'm somewhat surprised our car-besotted government hasn't sawn up the whole network and flogged it off by the foot.

The afterlife of Dennis Potter

When Britain's greatest TV writer died in 1994, he left behind two last works and some extraordinary instructions. Robin Buss reports

Weeping Brando apologises to Jews

Los Angeles (Reuter) - The actor Marlon Brando, who sparked a storm of criticism for saying Hollywood was run by Jews, broke down and wept yesterday when he met Jewish leaders to apologise for his comments.

Tinseltown in search of lost lustre

The boulevard of broken dreams is closed to traffic. Workers on Los Angeles' multi-billion dollar and much-maligned new subway system tunnelling beneath Hollywood Boulevard, have been stalled by a series of sinkholes.
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Israel-Gaza conflict: No victory for Israel despite weeks of death and devastation

Robert Fisk: No victory for Israel despite weeks of devastation

Palestinians have won: they are still in Gaza, and Hamas is still there
Mary Beard writes character reference for Twitter troll who called her a 'slut'

Unlikely friends: Mary Beard and the troll who called her a ‘filthy old slut’

The Cambridge University classicist even wrote the student a character reference
America’s new apartheid: Prosperous white districts are choosing to break away from black cities and go it alone

America’s new apartheid

Prosperous white districts are choosing to break away from black cities and go it alone
Amazon is buying Twitch for £600m - but why do people want to watch others playing Xbox?

What is the appeal of Twitch?

Amazon is buying the video-game-themed online streaming site for £600m - but why do people want to watch others playing Xbox?
Tip-tapping typewriters, ripe pongs and slides in the office: Bosses are inventing surprising ways of making us work harder

How bosses are making us work harder

As it is revealed that one newspaper office pumps out the sound of typewriters to increase productivity, Gillian Orr explores the other devices designed to motivate staff
Manufacturers are struggling to keep up with the resurgence in vinyl records

Hard pressed: Resurgence in vinyl records

As the resurgence in vinyl records continues, manufacturers and their outdated machinery are struggling to keep up with the demand
Tony Jordan: 'I turned down the chance to research Charles Dickens for a TV series nine times ... then I found a kindred spirit'

A tale of two writers

Offered the chance to research Charles Dickens for a TV series, Tony Jordan turned it down. Nine times. The man behind EastEnders and Life on Mars didn’t feel right for the job. Finally, he gave in - and found an unexpected kindred spirit
Could a later start to the school day be the most useful educational reform of all?

Should pupils get a lie in?

Doctors want a later start to the school day so that pupils can sleep later. Not because teenagers are lazy, explains Simon Usborne - it's all down to their circadian rhythms
Prepare for Jewish jokes – as Jewish comedians get their own festival

Prepare for Jewish jokes...

... as Jewish comedians get their own festival
SJ Watson: 'I still can't quite believe that Before I Go to Sleep started in my head'

A dream come true for SJ Watson

Watson was working part time in the NHS when his debut novel, Before I Go to Sleep, became a bestseller. Now it's a Hollywood movie, too. Here he recalls the whirlwind journey from children’s ward to A-list film set
10 best cycling bags for commuters

10 best cycling bags for commuters

Gear up for next week’s National Cycle to Work day with one of these practical backpacks and messenger bags
Paul Scholes: Three at the back isn’t working yet but given time I’m hopeful Louis van Gaal can rebuild Manchester United

Paul Scholes column

Three at the back isn’t working yet but given time I’m hopeful Louis van Gaal can rebuild Manchester United
Kate Bush, Hammersmith Apollo music review: A preamble, then a coup de théâtre - and suddenly the long wait felt worth it

Kate Bush shows a voice untroubled by time

A preamble, then a coup de théâtre - and suddenly the long wait felt worth it
Robot sheepdog technology could be used to save people from burning buildings

The science of herding is cracked

Mathematical model would allow robots to be programmed to control crowds and save people from burning buildings
Tyrant: Is the world ready for a Middle Eastern 'Dallas'?

This tyrant doesn’t rule

It’s billed as a Middle Eastern ‘Dallas’, so why does Fox’s new drama have a white British star?