News In fact, the actor went as far as to threaten the One Direction star live on television, telling host Conan O’Brien: “That little prick’s gonna get it.”

The actor threatened the One Direction star live on television, telling host Conan O’Brien that he wanted to "beat the c**p of him" in a video

Seagram buys PolyGram from Philips for $10.6bn

SEAGRAM, the Canadian drinks and entertainment powerhouse, has agreed to buy PolyGram from the Dutch electronics giant Philips for $10.6bn in a long-awaited deal that will join some of the music industry's biggest stars under the same roof.

PolyGram price leaps on sale hope

POLYGRAM, the world's biggest music company, yesterday welcomed a statement by Phillips, its owner, which had fuelled speculation that a sale of the company was imminent.

Media: All together now: do we love Barney or don't we?

If you want to sell a toy, go for parental guilt. Bill Gates the computer billionaire knows it; his Barney the dinosaur is a runaway success in the US. Will we British fall for the same spiel? By Serena Mackesy

Florida counts cost of tornado disaster

President Bill Clinton will today tour a tornado-ravaged belt of Florida, close to Walt Disney World, where a dozen twisters killed at least 38 people within a few minutes in the small hours of Monday.

30 die as tornadoes tear into Florida

AT LEAST 30 PEOPLE were killed when an unprecedented string of tornadoes, driven by the El Nino weather phenomenon, churned through the Orlando area of Florida before dawn yesterday, near Walt Disney World and other tourist attractions.

Creative Industries: Profile Colin Leventhal: Leading man in the big British picture

Dana Rubin meets the executive put in place by American moguls to capitalise on the resurgent UK film industry

Seagram harbours doubts over Allied deal

Allied Domecq's hopes for a drinks merger with Seagram could be dashed because several senior executives at the Canadian drinks giant harbour grave doubts about the potential deal.

Travel: Your flight into low Earth orbit is now boarding...

It's not been lost on travel operators that getting tourists into space is the great challenge of the next century. By Jane Anderson

Arts: Harold Robbins, blockbuster king, dies aged 81

The author Harold Robbins, who chronicled the lives of the jet- set in books such as The Carpetbaggers, has died at the age of 81 in California.

LA subway project heads for the buffers

Federal government balks at providing matching funds amid charges of corruption at municipal level

New swinger in town

When Jon Favreau arrived in LA he had no acting work and no girlfriend. Trying to get a date in Hollywood became his obsession, and when he wasn't doing that he was writing a script about it. The script became `Swingers', and suddenly relationships and jobs were the least of his problems. Interview by Ryan Gilbey

How to flog a dinosaur to death

Parents, brace yourselves and your wallets. The Lost World isn't the only film this summer that could cost you a lot more than the price of a cinema ticket.

A dinosaur, a duck and a hack that wasn't

Was it really a hack? Last week, for about five hours, an image of a dinosaur on Universal Pictures' film site for The Lost World (http://www.lost- world.com) was replaced by an image of a rubber duck, signed "hackers" at the bottom. Prima-facie evidence of hacking?

City & Business: Eddie needs a result from his first test

The inaugural meeting of the Bank of England's new monetary policy committee goes into session on Thursday. The meeting will conclude on Friday morning, and at midday the committee will announce whether interest rates are to change or not. The betting in the market is that they will not, but that view is based more on practicalities than on fundamental economics.

Seagram sells $1.4bn stake

Seagram, the Canadian drinks and entertainment company, yesterday sparked intense speculation that it would soon hit the acquisition trail after it sold half its stake in Time Warner for $1.39bn (pounds 850m).
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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine