i In the frame: Eileen Cooper accuses the art world of failing women

Meet Eileen Cooper: she wants to shake up the art world.

UK at risk of losing lead in stem cell research

Britain's attempts to take stem cell research from the laboratory to the clinic are being undermined by government red tape and a lack of interest from City investors, according to experts meeting in London today.

Light drinking when pregnant may lead to calm babies, says study

Drinking one or two glasses of wine a week during pregnancy does not harm the mental development of the baby and is even linked with an overall improvement in the behaviour of toddlers, a major study found.

Scientists prove it really is a thin line between love and hate

The same brain circuitry is involved in both extreme emotions – but hate retains a semblance of rationality

Tom Courtenay: 'I had this knack, my own thing'

From Hull docks to the infamous Marshalsea prison in the BBC's Little Dorrit, it's been a long-distance journey for Tom Courtenay

State school outshines private rivals

Parents line up to enrol children in sixth form at specialist maths college

Sick leave linked to early death

Employees who take regular periods of long-term sick leave die earlier than their colleagues, a study by the British Medical Journal said today.

MPs urge the Queen to cut her costs

MPs have called on the Queen to live according to her means after an investigation by The Independent revealed that Buckingham Palace was facing a cash crisis over the costs of her staff and palaces.

Wealth Check: The £30,000 burden that awaits on graduation

What can a student do to cope with the cost of university life and the debt that must be repaid later? By Harriet Meyer

Leading Article: Britain doing well

The international league table for 2008 produced by Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China show British universities continuing to perform well in global rankings, and better, for example, than other European countries such as Germany, which invest more money in higher education than the UK. Cambridge comes top in Europe after Harvard, Stanford and Berkeley, and the big news is that UCL has overtaken Imperial to come in third position in the UK (22nd in the table).

Students in rush to grab final places at university

The "house full" sign has gone up at most of Britain's leading universities as students snapped up places on courses at a record rate. But a lifeline was offered for youngsters who had flunked their A-levels as some universities urged them to sign up for foundation degree courses that could pave the way for a full degree course later.

Lost in translation: Mary Rose's demise blamed on multilingual crew

One of the greatest naval disasters in history occurred when the Mary Rose, pride of the English battle fleet, sank in the Solent just before dawn on 19 July 1545, in sight of the French fleet, with the loss of more than 400 lives. No one knows why. The delighted French claimed a direct hit, though in fact the ship was undamaged; the English blamed an undisciplined crew.

Jacob Blacker: Architect who assisted Goldfinger

Before and after the Second World War, London was a magnet for talented and ambitious Commonwealth architecture graduates seeking professional experience. One of these was Jacob Blacker.

James Thompson: Can we justify seeking The Truth by torment?

This interrogation is not a pleasant sight. We see a lone teenager put under pressure by a skilled questioner who shows apparent concern for his well-being, mixed with bellicose entreaties that he should be honest and go back on his story, a crude but often effective approach. The interrogator has built a relationship of sorts with his captive. He is playing to the suspect's self-esteem as someone who is too good at heart to tell a lie unless he avoids the other person's eye. The deliberate analogy is with a parent who confronts a mischievous child and says: "Look me in the eye and tell me the truth and all will be forgiven."

Breakthrough in migraine therapy

New anti-migraine drugs that have fewer side effects than existing treatments could be on the market within three years, scientists said yesterday.

Leading Article: Global vision

University College London's decision to set up shop in South Australia by opening a Masters programme in energy and resources is a smart move. Any university that wants to be taken seriously as a global player needs to be thinking where to locate a campus to cash in on the burgeoning international market in higher education and to get its name out into the marketplace.

News
A 1930 image of the Karl Albrecht Spiritousen and Lebensmittel shop, Essen. The shop was opened by Karl and Theo Albrecht’s mother; the brothers later founded Aldi
people
Arts and Entertainment
Standing the test of time: Michael J Fox and Christopher Lloyd in 'Back to the Future'
filmA cult movie event aims to immerse audiences of 80,000 in ‘Back to the Future’. But has it lost its magic?
Arts and Entertainment
Flora Spencer-Longhurst as Lavinia, William Houston as Titus Andronicus and Dyfan Dwyfor as Lucius
theatreThe Shakespeare play that proved too much for more than 100 people
News
exclusivePunk icon Viv Albertine on Sid Vicious, complacent white men, and why free love led to rape
Arts and Entertainment
Stir crazy: Noel Fielding in 'Luxury Comedy 2: Tales from Painted Hawaii'
comedyAs ‘Luxury Comedy’ returns, Noel Fielding on why mainstream success scares him and what the future holds for 'The Boosh'
Life and Style
Flow chart: Karl Landsteiner discovered blood types in 1900, yet scientists have still not come up with an explanation for their existence
lifeAll of us have one. Yet even now, it’s a matter of debate what they’re for
Arts and Entertainment
'Weird Al' Yankovic, or Alfred Matthew, at the 2014 Los Angeles Film Festival Screening of
musicHis latest video is an ode to good grammar. But what do our experts think he’s missed out?
Sport
New Real Madrid signing James Rodríguez with club president Florentino Perez
sportColombian World Cup star completes £63m move to Spain
Travel
Hotel Tour d’Auvergne in Paris launches pay-what-you-want
travelIt seems fraught with financial risk, but the policy has its benefits
Arts and Entertainment
booksThe best children's books for this summer
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Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy': A land of the outright bizarre

Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy'

A land of the outright bizarre
What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

‘Weird Al’ Yankovic's latest video is an ode to good grammar. But what do The Independent’s experts think he’s missed out?
Can Secret Cinema sell 80,000 'Back to the Future' tickets?

The worst kept secret in cinema

A cult movie event aims to immerse audiences of 80,000 in ‘Back to the Future’. But has it lost its magic?
Facebook: The new hatched, matched and dispatched

The new hatched, matched and dispatched

Family events used to be marked in the personal columns. But now Facebook has usurped the ‘Births, Deaths and Marriages’ announcements
Why do we have blood types?

Are you my type?

All of us have one but probably never wondered why. Yet even now, a century after blood types were discovered, it’s a matter of debate what they’re for
Honesty box hotels: You decide how much you pay

Honesty box hotels

Five hotels in Paris now allow guests to pay only what they think their stay was worth. It seems fraught with financial risk, but the honesty policy has its benefit
Commonwealth Games 2014: Why weight of pressure rests easy on Michael Jamieson’s shoulders

Michael Jamieson: Why weight of pressure rests easy on his shoulders

The Scottish swimmer is ready for ‘the biggest race of my life’ at the Commonwealth Games
Some are reformed drug addicts. Some are single mums. All are on benefits. But now these so-called 'scroungers’ are fighting back

The 'scroungers’ fight back

The welfare claimants battling to alter stereotypes
Amazing video shows Nasa 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action

Fireballs in space

Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
A Bible for billionaires

A Bible for billionaires

Find out why America's richest men are reading John Brookes
Paranoid parenting is on the rise - and our children are suffering because of it

Paranoid parenting is on the rise

And our children are suffering because of it
For sale: Island where the Magna Carta was sealed

Magna Carta Island goes on sale

Yours for a cool £4m
Phone hacking scandal special report: The slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

The hacker's tale: the slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

Glenn Mulcaire was jailed for six months for intercepting phone messages. James Hanning tells his story in a new book. This is an extract
We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

Child abusers are not all the same, yet the idea of treating them differently in relation to the severity of their crimes has somehow become controversial
The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

For instance, did Isis kill the Israeli teenagers to trigger a war, asks Patrick Cockburn