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Luhman 16B is the nearest brown dwarf to Earth, and the third nearest star system to our solar system

How the world's most famous film critic got his real voice back

Cancer left Roger Ebert reliant on an artificial voice machine. But now, by using recordings of his old broadcasts, it sounds just like him

Steve Richards: Almost everything you think you know about the PM is untrue

After his interview, he won't be so easy for the airbrushed Tory leadership to dismiss

Impact of the recession: more suicides, fewer divorces

Couples may be staying together because they can't afford to split, figures suggest

Ruck and Maul: 'You can't trick God' says Jones, who knows what day it is

The news that Northampton's devoutly Christian prop Euan Murray will sit out Scotland's first match of the 2010 Six Nations Championship against France in Paris due to it being on a Sunday caused quite a stir. However, there have been similar acts of faith, including by athletes Jonathan Edwards and Barrington Williams, cricketer David Sheppard and rugby's own All Black flanker Michael Jones, who missed the 1991 World Cup semi-final defeat by Australia and was omitted from the 1995 tournament to avoid any repeat. The 1991 match was in Dublin and it was pointed out in some desperation to Jones that Sunday afternoon in Ireland was Monday morning at home in New Zealand. "You can't trick God," Jones said. "It is where you are at the time, and Sunday wherever you are is the day that has been put aside for church and fellowship." Most famously, Eric Liddell's withdrawal from the 100 yards in the 1924 Olympic Games was depicted in the film 'Chariots of Fire'. Fortunately for Liddell, who played rugby for Edinburgh University, his international debut as a 19-year-old winger for Scotland – against France in Paris on 2 January 1922 – was on a Monday. According to John Keddie's biography, 'Running the Race', Liddell refused to organise sports on the Lord's Day even in the Second World War internment camp in China where he was to meet his death, apart from refereeing kids' hockey games which would otherwise have degenerated into all-out scraps.

Early test found for Alzheimer's

A multi-tasking test can help avoid confusion between symptoms of depression and early Alzheimer's, research suggests.

Sir John Crofton: Physician whose research revolutionised the treatment of tuberculosis and lung disease

For seven decades John Crofton conducted a professional and public battle against tuberculosis and lung disease.

Sula Wolff: Child psychiatrist who made pioneering advances in her field

The eminent child psychiatrist Sula Wolff has died aged 85. She was one of the founders of modern child psychiatry in post-war Britain, helping to bring a rigorous scientific engagement to augment clinical practice.

Daily dose of aspirin could be bad for your health

Taking an aspirin a day to ward off heart attacks is ineffective for the "worried well" and can cause serious harm, a study has shown.

Ian Shepherd: Archaeologist who led the way in Scottish research

Ian Shepherd, doyen of Scottish Local Authority archaeologists, has died at the early age of 58. The first such post-holder in the country, appointed to the newly formed Grampian Region in 1975, he was eventually Principal Archaeologist, Aberdeenshire Council, overseeing cultural heritage matters also for Angus and Moray.

Losing your mind? The answer is in the mirror

Men with asymmetrical faces are more likely to see their mental powers fade with age, scientists have discovered

The American Dream? Not for all the pilgrims

Thousands returned within a few years of crossing the Atlantic, academic reveals

Edward Harper: Composer who championed contemporary music in Scotland

A CD of Edward Harper's music released by the Edinburgh label Delphian Records last year bore the title Miracles, after the penultimate movement of his Second Symphony, the main item on the disc. The miracle was rather that Harper had not only survived to see it released, he even lived long enough to begin a Third Symphony in spite of a lengthy battle against bowel cancer that he faced with courage and calm. That battle appeared to be won, but the cancer metastasised into the liver, with fatal results.

Tom Johnston: Influential economist who worked to forge links between academia and industry

Tom Johnston was an economist who, as Principal and Vice-Chancellor of Heriot-Watt University, worked tirelessly to forge links between academia and industry. He was also one of the pioneers of Manpower Economics, the study of the labour market.

Rowling quits multiple sclerosis charity over Anglo-Scottish feud

Writer whose mother suffered from the illness saddened by series of resignations at MS Society
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Refugee crisis: David Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia - will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi?

Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia...

But will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi, asks Robert Fisk
Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Humanity must be at the heart of politics, says Jeremy Corbyn
Joe Biden's 'tease tour': Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?

Joe Biden's 'tease tour'

Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?
Britain's 24-hour culture: With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever

Britain's 24-hour culture

With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever
Diplomacy board game: Treachery is the way to win - which makes it just like the real thing

The addictive nature of Diplomacy

Bullying, betrayal, aggression – it may be just a board game, but the family that plays Diplomacy may never look at each other in the same way again
Lady Chatterley's Lover: Racy underwear for fans of DH Lawrence's equally racy tome

Fashion: Ooh, Lady Chatterley!

Take inspiration from DH Lawrence's racy tome with equally racy underwear
8 best children's clocks

Tick-tock: 8 best children's clocks

Whether you’re teaching them to tell the time or putting the finishing touches to a nursery, there’s a ticker for that
Charlie Austin: Queens Park Rangers striker says ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

Charlie Austin: ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

After hitting 18 goals in the Premier League last season, the QPR striker was the great non-deal of transfer deadline day. But he says he'd preferred another shot at promotion
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones