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Luhman 16B is the nearest brown dwarf to Earth, and the third nearest star system to our solar system

British scientists to create 'synthetic' blood

Human embryos will be used to make an unlimited supply for infection-free transfusions

Darwin's Sacred Cause, By Adrian Desmond and James Moore

Did Darwin develop his theory of evolution for use as a weapon in the fight against slavery?

Andrew Rowe: Europhile MP who served as aide to Edward Heath

Andrew Rowe was an intelligent and independent-minded Conservative who represented Mid Kent in Parliament from 1983 to 1987 and then fought and won the newly created and much more marginal seat of Faversham and Mid Kent despite the Labour landslide in 1997. He belonged to One Nation, The Tory Reform Group and Conservative Mainstream and found himself even more out of tune with William Hague’s Conservative Party than he had been with Margaret Thatcher’s. The nearest he came to office was his period as a PPS, first to Richard Needham from 1992-94, and then to Earl Ferrers (1994-95). A staunch Europhile, he had earlier acted as Edward Heath’s parliamentary aide (1984-87).

Vet forces Scots to consult Dr Cross

Perhaps it shouldn't happen to a vet, but then having chosen to pursue a professional life grinding away at the rugby union coal face rather than with his mitts stuck up a cow's backside, Euan Murray could only expect the kind of collateral damage that will keep him out of Scotland's Six Nations opener against Wales at Murrayfield on Sunday. The stand-out player for his country in the autumn, the Northampton Saint and fully qualified veterinarian has been sidelined by a popped rib. His place at tighthead prop will be taken by an international debutant who just happens to be a qualified doctor.

Rising Star: Jen Hadfield, poet

As the youngest winner of the T S Eliot Prize, at 30, Jen Hadfield is also a relative newcomer. The £15,000 cheque that she collected on Monday has previously been awarded to Seamus Heaney, Carol Ann Duffy and Ted Hughes – though never to Andrew Motion, the chair of this year's judges.

Rising Star: Lucy Moore, Historian

Brought up in Britain and the US, educated at Edinburgh University, historian Lucy Moore (born in 1970) first honed her narrative skills on the low-life underside of 18th-century society in books such as 'The Thieves' Opera' and 'Con Men and Cutpurses'. Chosen as one of the 'Independent on Sunday''s Top 20 young British authors in 2001, she won wide acclaim with two books about groups of women. 'Maharanis' followed the mixed fortunes of a quartet of Indian princesses and their families, while 'Liberty' told the stories of six women caught up in the French Revolution as it turned away from its ideals of gender equality. Published next month, her new book 'Anything Goes' is an especially well-timed history of the Roaring Twenties as the decade motored from hedonistic, high-spending boom to the bust of the Great Crash in 1929.

Quest for 'Big Bang' delayed by fault in Hadron Collider

Overheated magnets have delayed the next stage of the £5bn experiment to recreate the Big Bang, scientists working on the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva have said.

Ian Rankin: 'This is my Ocean's Eleven'

Ian Rankin's first post-Rebus novel is an art-theft caper that paints his Edinburgh in new colours. Boyd Tonkin talks to him

So what the heck is a hadron?

The Large Hadron Collider: End of the world, or God's own particle?

A bewildered Cole Moreton goes in search of the science behind the spin

The Rev Andrew Ross: Missionary and Church historian

Andrew Ross was a distinguished missionary, academic scholar and university leader during an illustrious career that spanned several continents. Born into a coal-mining family in the Lothians of Scotland, he retained the commitment to family life, community, football and social justice that was instilled in him from his earliest days. All these he celebrated with a characteristic passion and infectious enthusiasm.

Manchester is Europe's self-harm capital

Manchester has the highest rate of self-harm in Europe, according to a study released today.

Thunder won't cloud rowers' belief

Thunder and lightning called off rowing at Shunyi today, causing semi-finals for three British lightweight crews to be postponed until Friday. There are high hopes that all of them will join the eight crews already lined up for finals tomorrow or on Sunday.

Top detective to review Dando case

A senior Scotland Yard detective was tonight given the go-ahead to review evidence in the Jill Dando case in an attempt to identify new leads.

Fab four ready to steer Kathy home

Oarsome foursome can give Grainger a fairytale ending by winning the first women's rowing gold for GB in the quadruple sculls
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
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Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent