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Luhman 16B is the nearest brown dwarf to Earth, and the third nearest star system to our solar system

Edinburgh Festival: Why the Fringe is rocking

"It always struck me as strange that there wasn't a contemporary music strand during the Edinburgh Festival," Dave Corbett says. It was after he moved north of the border 12 years ago to work for DF Concerts, the Scots music promoters who run T in the Park, that Corbett set about remedying the situation.

Cycling: Hoy is ready to dig deep again and raid Olympic gold mine

Demise of the kilo will not stop inspirational memories of Athens

GPs pledge to fight 'unfair' health reforms

Doctors say they feel 'rubbished' by proposals that they claim will lead to NHS privatisation and do irreversible damage to patient care

Old Scotland took the high road. New Scotland is upwardly mobile

Since the 1980s Scottish society has been transformed at unprecedented speed, and Glasgow is dubbed the 'Capital of Cool'. But the 300-year relationship with England isn't about to end.

Literary prize hopefuls named

An award-winning poet, a best-selling American author and a Man Booker Prize contender are on the shortlist for Britain's oldest literary award, it was announced today.

The cloning revolution (part 2)

After Dolly comes a new scientific technique that is being used to save a doomed species of the white rhino. Could this herald a world without extinction?

Mary Dejevsky: A gender divide is increasing in the professions

As the better performers at school, they have the pick of the professions

MBA: Public approval

Business schools are adapting their courses as the boundaries between public and private sectors blur. Peter Brown reports

John Bartholomew: Scion of a map-making dynasty

Only those who have experienced it themselves can appreciate what it means to be born into a dynasty. Six generations of the Bartholomew family, culminating in John Bartholomew (John Christopher Bartholomew, or "JCB") and his younger brothers Peter and Robert, built the map-making dynasty of John Bartholomew and Sons.

Education Diary: Bahram Bekhradnia's clever wheeze

* Surviving as a think tank is not easy at the best of times, particularly if you specialise in higher education and have to squeeze money out of tight-fisted foundations. But Bahram Bekhradnia, director of the Higher Education Policy Institute, has come up with a clever wheeze. He has struck up a relationship with the Saudis and has become their representative in the United Kingdom on higher education. In return for a fee (we hope it's a large one) Hepi will give advice to Saudi Arabia and create opportunities for their academics to visit the UK and vice versa. But that's not all. Hepi will also review the Saudis' strategy for developing its universities. We hope that pays for a few more years of hard-hitting research projects.

John Rentoul: The mystery of Blair the convert

As his biographer, I failed to grasp the full extent of his Catholicism, but I don't believe it sheds any light on his actions

Hamza El Din

Early practitioner of world music

Lampard determined to make up for missed trip to Japan and Korea

Heartbreak of rejection drives Chelsea midfielder in quest for worldwide recognition, writes Andy Hunter

Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Forum, London</br>Radiohead, Civic Hall, Wolverhampton

Karen, you give me the fevers
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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No postcode? No vote

Floating voters

How living on a houseboat meant I didn't officially 'exist'
Louis Theroux's affable Englishman routine begins to wear thin

By Reason of Insanity

Louis Theroux's affable Englishman routine begins to wear thin
Power dressing is back – but no shoulderpads!

Power dressing is back

But banish all thoughts of Eighties shoulderpads
Spanish stone-age cave paintings 'under threat' after being re-opened to the public

Spanish stone-age cave paintings in Altamira 'under threat'

Caves were re-opened to the public
'I was the bookies’ favourite to be first to leave the Cabinet'

Vince Cable interview

'I was the bookies’ favourite to be first to leave the Cabinet'
Election 2015: How many of the Government's coalition agreement promises have been kept?

Promises, promises

But how many coalition agreement pledges have been kept?
The Gaza fisherman who built his own reef - and was shot dead there by an Israeli gunboat

The death of a Gaza fisherman

He built his own reef, and was fatally shot there by an Israeli gunboat
Saudi Arabia's airstrikes in Yemen are fuelling the Gulf's fire

Saudi airstrikes are fuelling the Gulf's fire

Arab intervention in Yemen risks entrenching Sunni-Shia divide and handing a victory to Isis, says Patrick Cockburn
Zayn Malik's departure from One Direction shows the perils of fame in the age of social media

The only direction Zayn could go

We wince at the anguish of One Direction's fans, but Malik's departure shows the perils of fame in the age of social media
Young Magician of the Year 2015: Meet the schoolgirl from Newcastle who has her heart set on being the competition's first female winner

Spells like teen spirit

A 16-year-old from Newcastle has set her heart on being the first female to win Young Magician of the Year. Jonathan Owen meets her
Jonathan Anderson: If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

British designer Jonathan Anderson is putting his stamp on venerable house Loewe
Number plates scheme could provide a licence to offend in the land of the free

Licence to offend in the land of the free

Cash-strapped states have hit on a way of making money out of drivers that may be in collision with the First Amendment, says Rupert Cornwell
From farm to fork: Meet the Cornish fishermen, vegetable-growers and butchers causing a stir in London's top restaurants

From farm to fork in Cornwall

One man is bringing together Cornwall's most accomplished growers, fishermen and butchers with London's best chefs to put the finest, freshest produce on the plates of some of the country’s best restaurants
Robert Parker interview: The world's top wine critic on tasting 10,000 bottles a year, absurd drinking notes and New World wannabes

Robert Parker interview

The world's top wine critic on tasting 10,000 bottles a year, absurd drinking notes and New World wannabes
Don't believe the stereotype - or should you?

Don't believe the stereotype - or should you?

We exaggerate regional traits and turn them into jokes - and those on the receiving end are in on it too, says DJ Taylor