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Luhman 16B is the nearest brown dwarf to Earth, and the third nearest star system to our solar system

Edinburgh Festival: Why the Fringe is rocking

"It always struck me as strange that there wasn't a contemporary music strand during the Edinburgh Festival," Dave Corbett says. It was after he moved north of the border 12 years ago to work for DF Concerts, the Scots music promoters who run T in the Park, that Corbett set about remedying the situation.

Cycling: Hoy is ready to dig deep again and raid Olympic gold mine

Demise of the kilo will not stop inspirational memories of Athens

GPs pledge to fight 'unfair' health reforms

Doctors say they feel 'rubbished' by proposals that they claim will lead to NHS privatisation and do irreversible damage to patient care

Old Scotland took the high road. New Scotland is upwardly mobile

Since the 1980s Scottish society has been transformed at unprecedented speed, and Glasgow is dubbed the 'Capital of Cool'. But the 300-year relationship with England isn't about to end.

Literary prize hopefuls named

An award-winning poet, a best-selling American author and a Man Booker Prize contender are on the shortlist for Britain's oldest literary award, it was announced today.

The cloning revolution (part 2)

After Dolly comes a new scientific technique that is being used to save a doomed species of the white rhino. Could this herald a world without extinction?

Mary Dejevsky: A gender divide is increasing in the professions

As the better performers at school, they have the pick of the professions

MBA: Public approval

Business schools are adapting their courses as the boundaries between public and private sectors blur. Peter Brown reports

John Bartholomew: Scion of a map-making dynasty

Only those who have experienced it themselves can appreciate what it means to be born into a dynasty. Six generations of the Bartholomew family, culminating in John Bartholomew (John Christopher Bartholomew, or "JCB") and his younger brothers Peter and Robert, built the map-making dynasty of John Bartholomew and Sons.

Education Diary: Bahram Bekhradnia's clever wheeze

* Surviving as a think tank is not easy at the best of times, particularly if you specialise in higher education and have to squeeze money out of tight-fisted foundations. But Bahram Bekhradnia, director of the Higher Education Policy Institute, has come up with a clever wheeze. He has struck up a relationship with the Saudis and has become their representative in the United Kingdom on higher education. In return for a fee (we hope it's a large one) Hepi will give advice to Saudi Arabia and create opportunities for their academics to visit the UK and vice versa. But that's not all. Hepi will also review the Saudis' strategy for developing its universities. We hope that pays for a few more years of hard-hitting research projects.

John Rentoul: The mystery of Blair the convert

As his biographer, I failed to grasp the full extent of his Catholicism, but I don't believe it sheds any light on his actions

Hamza El Din

Early practitioner of world music

Lampard determined to make up for missed trip to Japan and Korea

Heartbreak of rejection drives Chelsea midfielder in quest for worldwide recognition, writes Andy Hunter

Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Forum, London</br>Radiohead, Civic Hall, Wolverhampton

Karen, you give me the fevers
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 17 April 2015
NHS struggling to monitor the safety and efficacy of its services outsourced to private providers

Who's monitoring the outsourced NHS services?

A report finds that private firms are not being properly assessed for their quality of care
Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

The Tory MP said he did not want to stand again unless his party's manifesto ruled out a third runway. But he's doing so. Watch this space
How do Greek voters feel about Syriza's backtracking on its anti-austerity pledge?

How do Greeks feel about Syriza?

Five voters from different backgrounds tell us what they expect from Syriza's charismatic leader Alexis Tsipras
From Iraq to Libya and Syria: The wars that come back to haunt us

The wars that come back to haunt us

David Cameron should not escape blame for his role in conflicts that are still raging, argues Patrick Cockburn
Sam Baker and Lauren Laverne: Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

A new website is trying to declutter the internet to help busy women. Holly Williams meets the founders
Heston Blumenthal to cook up a spice odyssey for British astronaut manning the International Space Station

UK's Major Tum to blast off on a spice odyssey

Nothing but the best for British astronaut as chef Heston Blumenthal cooks up his rations
John Harrison's 'longitude' clock sets new record - 300 years on

‘Longitude’ clock sets new record - 300 years on

Greenwich horologists celebrate as it keeps to within a second of real time over a 100-day test
Fears in the US of being outgunned in the vital propaganda wars by Russia, China - and even Isis - have prompted a rethink on overseas broadcasters

Let the propaganda wars begin - again

'Accurate, objective, comprehensive': that was Voice of America's creed, but now its masters want it to promote US policy, reports Rupert Cornwell
Why Japan's incredible long-distance runners will never win the London Marathon

Japan's incredible long-distance runners

Every year, Japanese long-distance runners post some of the world's fastest times – yet, come next weekend, not a single elite competitor from the country will be at the London Marathon
Why does Tom Drury remain the greatest writer you've never heard of?

Tom Drury: The quiet American

His debut was considered one of the finest novels of the past 50 years, and he is every bit the equal of his contemporaries, Jonathan Franzen, Dave Eggers and David Foster Wallace
You should judge a person by how they peel a potato

You should judge a person by how they peel a potato

Dave Hax's domestic tips are reminiscent of George Orwell's tea routine. The world might need revolution, but we like to sweat the small stuff, says DJ Taylor
Beige is back: The drab car colours of the 1970s are proving popular again

Beige to the future

Flares and flounce are back on catwalks but a revival in ’70s car paintjobs was a stack-heeled step too far – until now
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef's dishes highlight the delicate essence of fresh cheeses

Bill Granger cooks with fresh cheeses

More delicate on the palate, milder, fresh cheeses can also be kinder to the waistline
Aston Villa vs Liverpool: 'This FA Cup run has been wonderful,' says veteran Shay Given

Shay Given: 'This FA Cup run has been wonderful'

The Villa keeper has been overlooked for a long time and has unhappy memories of the national stadium – but he is savouring his chance to play at Wembley
Timeless drama of Championship race in league of its own - Michael Calvin

Michael Calvin's Last Word

Timeless drama of Championship race in league of its own