Student

His notes and blog got him labelled an 'industry innovator' after the site attracted thousands of other students

Leading article: Green giant

Don't tell Bluto. Younger readers may need to be told that this oafish sailor, with his huge torso and beefy arms, was the arch-enemy of the cartoon character Popeye the Sailor Man. For 30 years, before and after the Second World War, weekly battles between the duo dominated the world of animated films. Despite his smaller physique, Popeye always triumphed over his nemesis with the aid of a can of the super-food spinach. For decades, this was suspected by the children as an adult ploy to persuade them to eat a vegetable which rarely appeals to children's palates. But now we know there was a scientific truth behind the parental instruction. Swedish scientists have discovered that spinach, or rather the nitrous oxide it produces when it comes in contact with human saliva, can lower blood pressure.

The Business on: Ian Penrose, Chief executive, Sportech

Mr Pools to bag the Tote?

Benedict Cumberbatch: Success? It's elementary

His performance as a waspish Sherlock Holmes has been hailed as seminal. Next he's appearing as Frankenstein at the National Theatre. Is he ready for the horrors of superstardom?

Ancient Koran comes into the modern age

One of the world's most important copies of the Koran is to be published online.

Gary Lineker criticises son's elite school

BBC football host Gary Lineker attacked an elite British private school today for failing to get his son into university.

Professor Alan Gilbert: Historian who became the highly successful first Vice-Chancellor of Manchester University

Alan Gilbert was a distinguished historian, transformational leader and effective defender of the value and importance of universities. He died less than a month after he retired as the inaugural President and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Manchester, Britain's biggest university.

Scientists at war over Government funding

An unseemly spat has broken out between two of the most distinguished bodies representing Britain's scientists and engineers over where the cuts should fall in the forthcoming review of the Government's science budget.

Nearly 70 graduates for every job vacancy

Graduates without a top-level degree pass will see their chances of getting a job this summer almost vanish, it was forecast today.

Capital Affairs: The Making of the Permissive Society, By Frank Mort

Prostitution, Profumo and a real puzzler: a professor of culture reveals (shock!) we had sex before 1963

Three cleared of insider-dealing charges

The record fine handed down to JP Morgan marked the latest stage in the FSA's attempts to crack down on the City, but the watchdog suffered a setback yesterday when two lawyers and a former finance director were acquitted of insider dealing charges that it had brought against them.

Geoffrey Beattie: The leaders locked horns, as big beasts do

The party leaders may work hard on their presentation, but the unconscious, animal signals they send are the most revealing

Why dumping a friend is hard

What's the best way to end a romance? A Dear John letter perhaps, or a teary phone call? But how do you dump a friend? Do the same rules apply?

Claude Blair: Authority on arms and armour who campaigned for the Victoria and Albert Museum in a time of crisis

Claude Blair was not only a world authority on arms and armour. He revelled in the subject, and to the end of his life travelled widely in pursuit of new understanding, but he was also a doughty fighter for causes close to his heart.

Inquest to probe safety record at Manchester University

Francis Beckett reports on the case of the academics who used to work in the rooms that Rutherford used

Lives Remembered: Tom Mulvey

Tom Mulvey was a prolific and original scientist who played a key role in shaping the development of the electron microscope. He was equally known as a witty and charming person who was devoted to his family and his students.

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Isis hostage crisis: The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power

Isis hostage crisis

The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power, says Robert Fisk
Missing salvage expert who found $50m of sunken treasure before disappearing, tracked down at last

The runaway buccaneers and the ship full of gold

Salvage expert Tommy Thompson found sunken treasure worth millions. Then he vanished... until now
Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Maverick artist Grayson Perry backs our campaign
Assisted Dying Bill: I want to be able to decide about my own death - I want to have control of my life

Assisted Dying Bill: 'I want control of my life'

This week the Assisted Dying Bill is debated in the Lords. Virginia Ironside, who has already made plans for her own self-deliverance, argues that it's time we allowed people a humane, compassionate death
Move over, kale - cabbage is the new rising star

Cabbage is king again

Sophie Morris banishes thoughts of soggy school dinners and turns over a new leaf
11 best winter skin treats

Give your moisturiser a helping hand: 11 best winter skin treats

Get an extra boost of nourishment from one of these hard-working products
Paul Scholes column: The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him

Paul Scholes column

The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him
Frank Warren column: No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans

Frank Warren's Ringside

No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee