Student

His notes and blog got him labelled an 'industry innovator' after the site attracted thousands of other students

Leading article: Green giant

Don't tell Bluto. Younger readers may need to be told that this oafish sailor, with his huge torso and beefy arms, was the arch-enemy of the cartoon character Popeye the Sailor Man. For 30 years, before and after the Second World War, weekly battles between the duo dominated the world of animated films. Despite his smaller physique, Popeye always triumphed over his nemesis with the aid of a can of the super-food spinach. For decades, this was suspected by the children as an adult ploy to persuade them to eat a vegetable which rarely appeals to children's palates. But now we know there was a scientific truth behind the parental instruction. Swedish scientists have discovered that spinach, or rather the nitrous oxide it produces when it comes in contact with human saliva, can lower blood pressure.

The Business on: Ian Penrose, Chief executive, Sportech

Mr Pools to bag the Tote?

Benedict Cumberbatch: Success? It's elementary

His performance as a waspish Sherlock Holmes has been hailed as seminal. Next he's appearing as Frankenstein at the National Theatre. Is he ready for the horrors of superstardom?

Ancient Koran comes into the modern age

One of the world's most important copies of the Koran is to be published online.

Gary Lineker criticises son's elite school

BBC football host Gary Lineker attacked an elite British private school today for failing to get his son into university.

Professor Alan Gilbert: Historian who became the highly successful first Vice-Chancellor of Manchester University

Alan Gilbert was a distinguished historian, transformational leader and effective defender of the value and importance of universities. He died less than a month after he retired as the inaugural President and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Manchester, Britain's biggest university.

Scientists at war over Government funding

An unseemly spat has broken out between two of the most distinguished bodies representing Britain's scientists and engineers over where the cuts should fall in the forthcoming review of the Government's science budget.

Nearly 70 graduates for every job vacancy

Graduates without a top-level degree pass will see their chances of getting a job this summer almost vanish, it was forecast today.

Capital Affairs: The Making of the Permissive Society, By Frank Mort

Prostitution, Profumo and a real puzzler: a professor of culture reveals (shock!) we had sex before 1963

Three cleared of insider-dealing charges

The record fine handed down to JP Morgan marked the latest stage in the FSA's attempts to crack down on the City, but the watchdog suffered a setback yesterday when two lawyers and a former finance director were acquitted of insider dealing charges that it had brought against them.

Geoffrey Beattie: The leaders locked horns, as big beasts do

The party leaders may work hard on their presentation, but the unconscious, animal signals they send are the most revealing

Why dumping a friend is hard

What's the best way to end a romance? A Dear John letter perhaps, or a teary phone call? But how do you dump a friend? Do the same rules apply?

Claude Blair: Authority on arms and armour who campaigned for the Victoria and Albert Museum in a time of crisis

Claude Blair was not only a world authority on arms and armour. He revelled in the subject, and to the end of his life travelled widely in pursuit of new understanding, but he was also a doughty fighter for causes close to his heart.

Inquest to probe safety record at Manchester University

Francis Beckett reports on the case of the academics who used to work in the rooms that Rutherford used

Cary Cooper: I had to resign from bullying helpline, confidentiality was breached

Years ago, a colleague and I from Manchester University conducted a study into bullying in the workplace, which found that it damaged people's health, mental wellbeing, and productivity and also meant they took more sick days. I could see that people needed a place to go when they couldn't go to their employers in case it was held against them.

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Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
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