Arts and Entertainment David Blunkett thinks shows that mock politicians should be subject to tougher libel scrutiny

Programmes that mock politicians cross the line from satire to comment, he says

Part beetle, part machine: It's a cybug

From the Six Million Dollar Man to the Terminator, cyborgs – part man, part machine – have fuelled SF fantasies and nightmares.

E Jane Dickson: The Left has lost the plot on private schools

As the world now knows, Boris Johnson is an old Etonian who was a bit of a prat at Oxford. It isn't the worst thing about him. Yet, as party lines are drawn for a general election, our obsession with where politicians received their education is second only to the shattering importance of their wives' wardrobes.

New map draws on population

A new world atlas which concentrates on population rather than land mass has been published today.

Minimum prices for alcohol would save lives, research finds

TheSNP's plan to introduce a minimum price for alcohol has won the backing of an academic report, which suggests that the move could save hundred of lives a year.

When life's an itch: How doctors are finding a cure for itching

It's had doctors scratching their heads for years. Now at last we're getting closer to understanding this maddening sensation – and finding a cure. Enjoli Liston reports

Sent down: students conquer cave network 550m deep

They had to negotiate hundreds of metres of dark, cramped and treacherous limestone tunnels, with no idea what might confront them around the next corner and no hope of rescue should they make a mistake. But in the end, it was worth it.

Bob Boucher: Engineer and gifted university vice-chancellor

Bob Boucher had a life of accomplishment as an engineer and academic, heading up leading universities in Sheffield and Manchester and promoting British education and high standards. His sudden death came as a particular shock since he remained, at the age of 68, a keep-fit enthusiast who went running every day, taking part in marathons and half-marathons. He collapsed and died while running.

Fashionable bedtime stories: Pyjamas have their moment

Usually consigned to the bedroom, pyjamas are having their moment in the sun thanks to the attentions of Dolce & Gabbana. Susannah Frankel reports on a sleep sensation

Tom Sutcliffe: A lesson in drinking from the Scots

When the All Party Parliamentary Beer Group sits down with government ministers tomorrow morning it won't be very long, one assumes, before the conversation turns to Scottish beer. And it won't be the qualities of Orkney Skullsplitter or Arran Blonde that dominate the conversation but the question of price – the Scottish government having announced yesterday that it plans to set minimum prices for alcohol and to ban bulk-buy promotions.

Alan Walker: When I'm old, I'd like to be treated fairly. Can our society deliver?

The Government has pinpointed demographic change as one of the three great challenges facing Britain (along with terrorism and global warming). That is a significant step but there is a missing element – the issue of fairness.

Alan Walker: It's time the Government acted to transform the lives of the elderly

Older People's human rights should be central to policy and practice. Too many older people experience discrimination and social exclusion, and feel they are not listened to or valued; far too many experience long poverty, low incomes and related health problems.

Sir Bernard Crick: Political theorist and Orwell biographer who advised the Government on citizenship teaching in schools

Bernard Crick was an academic who wrote two books which were international bestsellers and received critical acclaim. In Defence of Politics (1962) went through several editions, was translated into five languages and sold over 400,000 copies. For years it has been required reading for students. Nearly 20 years later he wrote the authoritative, if not official, George Orwell: A Life (1980). Crick generously attributed the warm reviews to his subject – "it's the man".

Gervase Phinn: I got a cracking string of O-levels

An education in the life of the author, public speaker and former school inspector

Ministers to call time on cheap drink

Home Secretary urged not to clamp down on pubs and bars in bid to cut drinking

Experts urge campaign to boost breastfeeding

Britain must adopt a national strategy to encourage breastfeeding, experts say today. The battle cry "breast is best" has been promoted by the childbirth lobby for decades, but 40 per cent of women in the UK who start to breastfeed give up by the time their baby is six weeks old.

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

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Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

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Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

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King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

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Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

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Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

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