Arts and Entertainment David Blunkett thinks shows that mock politicians should be subject to tougher libel scrutiny

Programmes that mock politicians cross the line from satire to comment, he says

Part beetle, part machine: It's a cybug

From the Six Million Dollar Man to the Terminator, cyborgs – part man, part machine – have fuelled SF fantasies and nightmares.

E Jane Dickson: The Left has lost the plot on private schools

As the world now knows, Boris Johnson is an old Etonian who was a bit of a prat at Oxford. It isn't the worst thing about him. Yet, as party lines are drawn for a general election, our obsession with where politicians received their education is second only to the shattering importance of their wives' wardrobes.

New map draws on population

A new world atlas which concentrates on population rather than land mass has been published today.

Minimum prices for alcohol would save lives, research finds

TheSNP's plan to introduce a minimum price for alcohol has won the backing of an academic report, which suggests that the move could save hundred of lives a year.

When life's an itch: How doctors are finding a cure for itching

It's had doctors scratching their heads for years. Now at last we're getting closer to understanding this maddening sensation – and finding a cure. Enjoli Liston reports

Sent down: students conquer cave network 550m deep

They had to negotiate hundreds of metres of dark, cramped and treacherous limestone tunnels, with no idea what might confront them around the next corner and no hope of rescue should they make a mistake. But in the end, it was worth it.

Bob Boucher: Engineer and gifted university vice-chancellor

Bob Boucher had a life of accomplishment as an engineer and academic, heading up leading universities in Sheffield and Manchester and promoting British education and high standards. His sudden death came as a particular shock since he remained, at the age of 68, a keep-fit enthusiast who went running every day, taking part in marathons and half-marathons. He collapsed and died while running.

Fashionable bedtime stories: Pyjamas have their moment

Usually consigned to the bedroom, pyjamas are having their moment in the sun thanks to the attentions of Dolce & Gabbana. Susannah Frankel reports on a sleep sensation

Tom Sutcliffe: A lesson in drinking from the Scots

When the All Party Parliamentary Beer Group sits down with government ministers tomorrow morning it won't be very long, one assumes, before the conversation turns to Scottish beer. And it won't be the qualities of Orkney Skullsplitter or Arran Blonde that dominate the conversation but the question of price – the Scottish government having announced yesterday that it plans to set minimum prices for alcohol and to ban bulk-buy promotions.

Alan Walker: When I'm old, I'd like to be treated fairly. Can our society deliver?

The Government has pinpointed demographic change as one of the three great challenges facing Britain (along with terrorism and global warming). That is a significant step but there is a missing element – the issue of fairness.

Alan Walker: It's time the Government acted to transform the lives of the elderly

Older People's human rights should be central to policy and practice. Too many older people experience discrimination and social exclusion, and feel they are not listened to or valued; far too many experience long poverty, low incomes and related health problems.

Sir Bernard Crick: Political theorist and Orwell biographer who advised the Government on citizenship teaching in schools

Bernard Crick was an academic who wrote two books which were international bestsellers and received critical acclaim. In Defence of Politics (1962) went through several editions, was translated into five languages and sold over 400,000 copies. For years it has been required reading for students. Nearly 20 years later he wrote the authoritative, if not official, George Orwell: A Life (1980). Crick generously attributed the warm reviews to his subject – "it's the man".

Gervase Phinn: I got a cracking string of O-levels

An education in the life of the author, public speaker and former school inspector

Ministers to call time on cheap drink

Home Secretary urged not to clamp down on pubs and bars in bid to cut drinking

Experts urge campaign to boost breastfeeding

Britain must adopt a national strategy to encourage breastfeeding, experts say today. The battle cry "breast is best" has been promoted by the childbirth lobby for decades, but 40 per cent of women in the UK who start to breastfeed give up by the time their baby is six weeks old.

Arts and Entertainment
Sydney and Melbourne are locked in a row over giant milk crates
art
News
Kenny Ireland, pictured in 2010.
peopleActor, from House of Cards and Benidorm, was 68
News
A scene from the video shows students mock rioting
newsEnd-of-year leaver's YouTube film features staging of a playground gun massacre
Travel
travel
Voices
A family sit and enjoy a quiet train journey
voicesForcing us to overhear dull phone conversations is an offensive act, says Simon Kelner
News
i100This Instagram photo does not prove Russian army is in Ukraine
News
Morrissey pictured in 2013
people
Sport
sportVan Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players
Environment
View from the Llanberis Track to the mountain lake Llyn
Du’r Arddu
environmentA large chunk of Mount Snowdon, in north Wales, is up for sale
Life and Style
Martha Stewart wrote an opinion column for Time magazine this week titled “Why I Love My Drone”
lifeLifestyle guru Martha Stewart reveals she has flying robot... to take photos of her farm
Career Services

Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Dress the Gaza situation up all you like, but the truth hurts

Robert Fisk on Gaza conflict

Dress the situation up all you like, but the truth hurts
Save the tiger: Tiger, tiger burning less brightly as numbers plummet

Tiger, tiger burning less brightly

When William Blake wrote his famous poem there were probably more than 100,000 tigers in the wild. These days they probably number around 3,200
5 News's Andy Bell retraces his grandfather's steps on the First World War battlefields

In grandfather's footsteps

5 News's political editor Andy Bell only knows his grandfather from the compelling diary he kept during WWI. But when he returned to the killing fields where Edwin Vaughan suffered so much, his ancestor came to life
Lifestyle guru Martha Stewart reveals she has flying robot ... to take photos of her farm

Martha Stewart has flying robot

The lifestyle guru used the drone to get a bird's eye view her 153-acre farm in Bedford, New York
Former Labour minister Meg Hillier has demanded 'pootling lanes' for women cyclists

Do women cyclists need 'pootling lanes'?

Simon Usborne (who's more of a hurtler) explains why winning the space race is key to happy riding
A tale of two presidents: George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story

A tale of two presidents

George W Bush downs his paintbrush to pen father’s life story
Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover

The dining car makes a comeback

Restaurateur Mitch Tonks has given the Great Western Pullman dining car a makeover
Gallery rage: How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?

Gallery rage

How are institutions tackling the discomfort of overcrowding this summer?
Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players

Eye on the prize

Louis van Gaal has £500,000 video surveillance system installed to monitor Manchester United players
Women's rugby: Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup

Women's rugby

Tamara Taylor adds fuel to the ire in quest to land World Cup
Save the tiger: The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

With only six per cent of the US population of these amazing big cats held in zoos, the Zanesville incident in 2011 was inevitable
Samuel Beckett's biographer reveals secrets of the writer's time as a French Resistance spy

How Samuel Beckett became a French Resistance spy

As this year's Samuel Beckett festival opens in Enniskillen, James Knowlson, recalls how the Irish writer risked his life for liberty and narrowly escaped capture by the Gestapo
We will remember them: relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War

We will remember them

Relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War
Star Wars Episode VII is being shot on film - and now Kodak is launching a last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Kodak's last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Director J J Abrams and a few digital refuseniks shoot movies on film. Simon Usborne wonders what the fuss is about
Once stilted and melodramatic, Hollywood is giving acting in video games a makeover

Acting in video games gets a makeover

David Crookes meets two of the genre's most popular voices