News Cuadrilla operated drill site in Balcombe, West Sussex. The company has withdrawn applications for permits to frack in Lancashire

Cuadrilla, the fracking company responsible for a series of earth tremors around Blackpool in 2011, has withdrawn applications for permits to frack in Lancashire after problems surfaced relating to the disposal of radioactive waste.

Britain urges countries to join forces in combating nuclear threat

Britain today issued a renewed appeal for countries to come together and combat the threat of a nuclear terrorist attack.

Britain's postgrad crisis puts us on the same level as Kazakhstan

Students put off extended study by rising course fees and lack of access to loans

Mr. Putin's gift to terrorists

When international diplomacy starts to sound like the set up for a 90s Sean Connery movie, you know there's trouble. The New York Times is in a tizz over Putin's decision to end a twenty year long relationship with the United States that saw American experts assist in cleaning up Russia's nuclear and chemical weapons sites left over from the cold war. Now, says an editorial, "the world must watch as Russia’s unsecured weapons and materials remain a temptation for terrorists of all varieties to buy or steal for use in future attacks".

UN urges Iran diplomatic resolution

The UN nuclear watchdog pressed Iran yesterday to address suspicions about nuclear-bomb research in the Islamic state, pursuing diplomatic efforts to resolve the dispute before any possible military action by Israel or the United States.

BHP Billiton sees a dive in profits

BHP Billiton has delayed its planned $20bn (£13bn) Olympic Dam copper expansion and said no major projects would be approved in the year to June 2013, as it battles escalating capital costs.

Sea uranium extraction 'close to economic reality'

Extracting uranium from seawater is closer to becoming an economic reality which could guarantee the future of nuclear power, scientists said today.

Iranian families sue UK over experts' deaths

Families of murdered Iranian nuclear scientists are suing Britain, Israel and the US, accusing them of being behind the killings.

Another G4S nightmare: 82-year-old nun beats guards to break into nuclear facility

Anti-nuclear protesters' successful incursion expose security failings at uranium plant

How hopes of a deal with Iran ended in meltdown

Iran's team dismissed the conditions as an infringement of its sovereignty

Deadlock at talks to curb Iran's nuclear progress

Iran and six world powers blamed each other for a deadlock at talks on Tehran's nuclear programme yesterday, as negotiators struggled to reduce the risk of a new Middle East war.

A detail from the 'Panel of Hands', El Castillo Cave in northern Spain showing red disks and hand stencils made by blowing or spitting paint onto the wall. A date from a calcium carbonate layer covering one of the red disks has revealed that the painting is more than 41,000 years old, making it the oldest known definitively-dated cave art in Europe. The image of the bison was painted by other Prehistoric people long after the hand images had been created.

Brutish? You have to hand it to the Neanderthals after all

Cave paintings dated as 15 milliennia older than originally thought, making them Europe's earliest known paintings

Iran nuclear talks resume for second day

Envoys from Iran and six world powers have resumed talks over Tehran's nuclear programme after issuing rival proposals during the opening day of negotiations in Baghdad.

Kodak reveals it had secret nuclear reactor for 30 years

The company that gave us the Instamatic has acknowledged that for 30 years it operated a small nuclear reactor in a basement on its corporate campus in Rochester, New York, unbeknown to almost everyone save a few scientists and engineers.

Talks begin with Iran over nuclear programme

Six world powers and Iran are meeting in an attempt to find common ground over concerns that Tehran's nuclear programme could be used to make weapons.

Politician claims Tehran can produce nuclear arms

A prominent Iranian politician has for the first time publicly declared that Iran has the ability to produce nuclear weapons, but will never do so.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
3.	Provence 6 nights B&B by train from £599pp
Prices correct as of 20 February 2015
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003