Sport Ice moves: Shiva Keshavan in Vancouver in 2010

When the athletes march into the opening ceremony of the Sochi Olympics next month, one flag you won't be seeing is the green, white, and saffron of India. Four Indian skiers will be participating in the games as independent athletes, but they won't be able to formally represent their country, since the Indian Olympic Association has been suspended by the International Olympic Committee since 2012.

Star Trek actor Walter Koenig's son found dead

Former Growing Pains actor Andrew Koenig was found dead in a wooded area of a sprawling Vancouver downtown park where he enjoyed spending time, apparently after committing suicide.

British curlers miss out on medal chance

David Murdoch suffered more acute Olympic disappointment as Great Britain's men's curling team failed to live up to their reputation as world champions and slid out of the competition before the medal stage.

Canada relief after hockey team beat Russia

Canada's dream of men's ice hockey gold stayed alive thanks to an impressive 7-3 quarter-final win over Olympic title rivals Russia.

Britain's bobsleigh medal hopes fade

Nicola Minichiello's hopes of claiming Olympic gold on the same Whistler track as Amy Williams suffered a blow when she trailed in 10th place after the first two runs of the women's bobsleigh.

Mixed fortunes for British curlers

Great Britain's curlers endured a disappointing day as the men were forced into a make or break play-off and the women bowed out with a fifth straight defeat.

James Lawton: Canada show signs of cracking under the weight of expectation

Ice hockey goaltenders would rather auction their soul than display frail human emotion

Bode Miller: Skiing's baddest boy comes good at last

He always had the talent, but failed to deliver. Now Bode Miller, the hard-partying downhill racer from the backwoods, is on top of the world

Olympics in Brief: British hopes in balance after loss

Curling: Britain's men face a fight to reach the semi-finals after losing to Canada 7-6. The hosts handed David Murdoch's side their third defeat in six games with just three games remaining in their round-robin schedule. With no room for slip-ups following two defeats in the opening five matches, Britain went into the game on a run of four successive wins over Kevin Martin's side, including last year's World Championship final in New Brunswick. In front of a raucous crowd Canada took a 2-0 lead in the second before Murdoch (left) brought Britain back with the final stone to close the third end. Britain then went 4-3 up half-way through only for Canada to tie at 5-5. A wrong line on the final throw gave Canada victory and left Murdoch's team fourth in the group ahead of last night's game with the US.

Muirhead on target to sweep all before her

Nineteen-year-old looks to repeat gold-winning glory of 2002 as she leads the GB women's curling team in Vancouver

Inside Lines: The (n)ice girl who has an entire nation whooshing on a star

According to the BBC, Amy Williams was unknown before winning the bob skeleton gold medal in Vancouver – but not to readers of this newspaper. Exactly a year ago we tipped her as the one to watch in the Winter Olympics in our Going for Gold series. The chemistry professor's daughter from Bath told us: "I know in my heart I can beat everyone out there." Now she has, wiping the ice with them, and Britain has a new star, one who took up one of the sport's most hazardous pursuits as "a bit of a giggle" and called the 90mph bone-shaking skeleton in her cupboard "Arthur". Williams has a personality as bubbly as her coiffure (her nickname is "Curly Wurly") and the temperament to handle all the pressure that inevitably will come her way as the nation's latest Golden Girl. A few things perhaps you didn't know about the former 400-metre runner: she plays the violin, loves horses, makes wedding cakes and tiaras as a hobby and hopes to get an art degree so she can open her own gallery. And she doesn't have a boyfriend: "I'm still looking for that rich polo player," she says. Britain is about to fall in love with Amy. In times when sport is being dragged through the mud, it's refreshing to be able to applaud the skill and courage of the nice girl with the winning streak.

Sport on TV: Dr Ice keeps his cool as double lugers huddle up to keep warm

Rumours that the greatest apologist – sorry, golfer – in the world, Tiger Woods, has been summoned by the organisers of the Winter Olympics to say sorry for the lack of snow are unfounded. But it might not be a bad idea for him to go up to Vancouver. Relations between the serial cheat and his wife Elin are so icy that he is not just walking around under a cloud, he's enswirled in a full-scale blizzard. But frigid he ain't.

Williams reaches the top on sliding scale

Former runner's single-minded determination earns Britain's first individual Winter Games gold medal for 30 years

A golden triumph in Vancouver

Lucrative sponsorship deals are likely to follow Amy Williams's Olympic triumph

Williams win is a 'ray of sunshine'

Family and friends of Britain's latest Olympic hero were today celebrating her success back at home, along with other sports stars. Sports Minister Gerry Sutcliffe called her win "a big ray of sunshine".

You Write the Caption - 19/02/10

Win a bottle of Champagne
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<p>
<b>Kathryn Williams</b>
</p>
<p>
When I was supporting Ray La Montagne I was six months pregnant. He had been touring for a year and he was exhausted and full of the cold. I was feeling motherly, so I would leave presents for him and his band: Tunnock's Tea Cakes, cold remedies and proper tea. Ray seemed painfully shy. He hardly spoke, hardly looked at you in the face. I felt like a dick speaking to him, but said "hi" every day. </p>
<p>
He was being courted by the same record company who had signed me and subsequently let me go, and I wanted him to know that there were people around who didn't want anything from him. At the Shepherds Bush Empire in London, on the last night of the tour, Ray stopped in his set to thank me for doing the support. He said I was a really good songwriter and people should buy my stuff. I was taken aback and felt emotionally overwhelmed. Later that year, just before I had my boy Louis, I was l asleep in bed with Radio 4 on when Louis moved around in my belly and woke me up. Ray was doing a session on the World Service. </p>
<p>
I really believe that Louis recognised the music from the tour, and when I gave birth to him at home I played Ray's record as something that he would recognise to come into the world with. </p>
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