Sport Ice moves: Shiva Keshavan in Vancouver in 2010

When the athletes march into the opening ceremony of the Sochi Olympics next month, one flag you won't be seeing is the green, white, and saffron of India. Four Indian skiers will be participating in the games as independent athletes, but they won't be able to formally represent their country, since the Indian Olympic Association has been suspended by the International Olympic Committee since 2012.

Andy Cole Column: Sometimes a casual text can be as dangerous as the Vancouver downhill

Fired Up! Most people can text or flirt or do pretty much whatever they want in their private life

Women's Skeleton: Williams fast emerging as Hollingsworth's true rival

Struggling Rudman in danger of being eclipsed by Bath's fearless contender

Ice, snow and a British victory - 6,000 miles from Vancouver

British success is likely to be as thin as the snow at the Winter Olympics in Vancouver. But take heart instead from our team's victory at the other end of the Americas.

The athletes 'hotting-up' the Winter Olympics

American skier Lindsay Vonn continues to battle against injury but is hopeful of being able to compete in Vancouver.

Hit & Run: So long Harry, hello Percy

Wannabe wizards worried about the magical-world vacuum to be left by the demise of the Harry Potter film franchise, the final movie of which is released in two parts in November and the following July (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, in case you ask) should take heart. There's a new adolescent with special powers and bum-fluff on his upper lip in town.

Market Report: BA shares take off after US tie-up approval

British Airways has had its fair share of bad news to endure in recent years, which is why seeing the group soaring at high altitude near the top the FTSE 100 yesterday was a welcome sight.

James Lawton: Canada finally has its golden moment – even if America 'owns' most podiums

When it all means too much you can't perform. It's an absurd approach to sport

Dead luger told father of his fears

Kumaritashvili warned of excessive track speeds before his fatal accident

Vancouver relief as Bilodeau takes gold

Vancouver exploded in wild celebration and exhaled a huge sigh of relief on Sunday after moguls skier Alexandre Bilodeau became the first Canadian to strike Olympic gold at home.

James Lawton: Vancouver’s quick descent from high ground

Kumaritashvili had just 26 practice runs, as opposed to the 200 for the Canadians

Inside Lines: Canadians' churlishness adds to the hazards on ice wall of death

The death of the Georgian luge athlete Nodar Kumaritashvili on Friday is a sombre reminder that Winter Olympics are not just the deep-frozen frolic that many non-Alpine nations seem to think. It is also worrying that the Canadian hosts acted so inhospitably by limiting training access to the hazardous run, that will also be used for the bob skeleton events in which British hopes Shelley Rudman and Amy Williams begin their medal assault this week, during the build-up to the Games. According to the British team leader, Andy Hunt, the skeleton sliders have had only 10 per cent of the practice time the Canadians have enjoyed. As Britain and other nations have been complaining for some time about Canada's attitude, presumably designed to gain home advantage, should not the International Olympic Committee's watchdogs have intervened? If nothing else, this latest tragedy – the fifth fatality in the history of the Winter Olympics – should quell those sniggers about sliding on ice and jumping around on skis not being worthy of Olympic medals. The British Olympic Association chairman, Colin Moynihan, says Vancouver has to be a turning point for the appreciation of winter sports in this country. Let's hope it does not take the death of a young Georgian to prove him right.

Athlete's death overshadows opening of Olympics

But decision of Georgian team not to pull out gives a boost to Winter Games hit by technological breakdown and a lack of snow

Snow business battles odds to counter nightmare start

The death of a luger, demonstrations, bad weather and glitches test organisers

Leading article: Frozen fun

Squeeze into the Lycra, don that helmet and sharpen those skates, for the Winter Olympics are upon us. The frozen Games never get the same attention as their summer counterpart, which is very unfair considering the range of attractions on offer, from the psychotic madness of the skeleton and the bobsleigh, to the rather more relaxed (though no less competitive) charms of curling.

The skip of Britain's curling team: All about Eve

Bagpiper, ace golfer and now – at just 19 – the skip of Britain's curling team. Eve Muirhead tells Simon Turnbull why she has gold in her sights
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
3.	Provence 6 nights B&B by train from £599pp
Prices correct as of 20 February 2015
Homeless Veterans campaign: Donations hit record-breaking £1m target after £300,000 gift from Lloyds Bank

Homeless Veterans campaign

Donations hit record-breaking £1m target after huge gift from Lloyds Bank
Flight MH370 a year on: Lost without a trace – but the search goes on

Lost without a trace

But, a year on, the search continues for Flight MH370
Germany's spymasters left red-faced after thieves break into brand new secret service HQ and steal taps

Germany's spy HQ springs a leak

Thieves break into new €1.5bn complex... to steal taps
International Women's Day 2015: Celebrating the whirlwind wit of Simone de Beauvoir

Whirlwind wit of Simone de Beauvoir

Simone de Beauvoir's seminal feminist polemic, 'The Second Sex', has been published in short-form for International Women's Day
Confessions of a planespotter: With three Britons under arrest in the UAE, the perils have never been more apparent

Confessions of a planespotter

With three Britons under arrest in the UAE, the perils have never been more apparent. Sam Masters explains the appeal
Mark Zuckerberg’s hiring policy might suit him – but it wouldn’t work for me

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Why would I want to employ someone I’d be happy to have as my boss, asks Simon Kelner
Russia's gulag museum 'makes no mention' of Stalin's atrocities

Russia's gulag museum

Ministry of Culture-run site 'makes no mention' of Stalin's atrocities
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The big fresh food con

Joanna Blythman reveals the alarming truth behind the chocolate muffin that won't decay
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Virginia Ironside was my landlady

Tim Willis reveals what it's like to live with an agony aunt on call 24/7
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8 best workout DVDs

If your 'New Year new you' regime hasn’t lasted beyond February, why not try working out from home?
War with Isis: Iraq's government fights to win back Tikrit from militants - but then what?

Baghdad fights to win back Tikrit from Isis – but then what?

Patrick Cockburn reports from Kirkuk on a conflict which sectarianism has made intractable
Living with Alzheimer's: What is it really like to be diagnosed with early-onset dementia?

What is it like to live with Alzheimer's?

Depicting early-onset Alzheimer's, the film 'Still Alice' had a profound effect on Joy Watson, who lives with the illness. She tells Kate Hilpern how she's coped with the diagnosis
The Internet of Things: Meet the British salesman who gave real-world items a virtual life

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British salesman Kevin Ashton gave real-world items a virtual life
Election 2015: Latest polling reveals Tories and Labour on course to win the same number of seats - with the SNP holding the balance of power

Election 2015: A dead heat between Mr Bean and Dick Dastardly!

Lord Ashcroft reveals latest polling – and which character voters associate with each leader
Audiences queue up for 'true stories told live' as cult competition The Moth goes global

Cult competition The Moth goes global

The non-profit 'slam storytelling' competition was founded in 1997 by the novelist George Dawes Green and has seen Malcolm Gladwell, Salman Rushdie and Molly Ringwald all take their turn at the mic