News Supply and demand: White rhinos at the Entabeni Safari Conservancy, Limpopo, South Africa

Gone are the days when a “Save the Rhino” advert was enough. Only about 25,000 rhinos are left in the wild, and thanks to poaching the species is critically endangered. Now, in an effort to drive down demand, conservationists are working on campaigns to understand what makes rhino horn consumers tick.

Global warming engulfs the world

Nicholas Schoon says the 'greenhouse effect' issue is not all hot air; Scientists predict a 2.5 degree centigrade increase in average temperatures by 2100

'I feel passionate about our continuing onslaught on the natural world, and the reckless extermination of ever-growing numbers of life forms. And the reason I feel passionate about other creatures is because I feel passionate about humankind.' Jonathon Porritt introduces this special report

The way we relate to other creatures is a very personal thing. Some people couldn't care less, and some seem to care more about animals than they do about human beings, which makes the job of generalising about endangered species a very tricky business I start from an odd position. Just as I don't much like pets (never having recovered from living near Hampstead Heath, with its army of dementedly defecating doggies), nor am I much turned on by the "big brown eye brigade" - the so-called charismatic mega fauna such as tigers, elephants, rhinos. pandas, birds of prey and so on. Give me the humble slime-mould on the forest floor any day! But I still feel passionate about our continuing onslaught on the natural world, and the reckless extermination of ever-growing numbers of life forms. And the reason I feel passionate about other creatures is precisely because I feel passionate about humankind - about our future, our quality of life, our moral and spiritual integrity. When asked the commonplace question, "Why bother about endangered species?", there are a host of possible answers: because other creatures have a basic right in themselves to be treated as equally valuable expressions of evolution as we humans; because our own self-interest may depend on some future use we come to make of these species or the habitats on which they depend; because we have no right to deprive future generations of their enjoyment or use of these creatures. But more important than all of these is the fact that we owe it to ourselves, right here and now, to fulfil our obligation to act as stewards of this heaving and mysterious multitude of life.

Claws bared in war over saving the Indian tiger

Civil war broke out in the conservation camp yesterday when the world's largest environmental charity, the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF), was slated over its efforts to protect the tiger.

Wildlife groups seek water curbs

Britain's leading wildlife groups will urge the Government to make the privatised water companies more accountable for the environment in a report now being finalised.

White rhinos radio back from edge of extinction

Wildlife rangers in Zaire are using a new weapon in their war on poachers,

Britain grows slow in world

CAN FARMING GO GREEN?

Terms of spill inquiry upset nature groups

`Sea Empress' oil disaster: Environmentalists fear vital issues will be ignored by investigation

Shoppers being `misled' by green claims

Watchdog report: Calls for stiffer laws on labelling

Obituary: W. R. Lee

W. R. Lee had probably the best-known address in the English-teaching world. For many years he ran the International Association of Teachers of English as a Foreign Language (IATEFL) from a private address in Hounslow, and combined that with editing English Language Teaching (now ELT Journal) for Oxford University Press. Almost single-handed, without any institutional base, he turned round amateur traditions (familiar to us through Isherwood in Berlin or Burgess in Malaysia) and established the EFL profession that we know today as one of Britain's greatest exporters of services.

Pretoria inquiry confirms secret battle for the rhino

FOREIGN STAFF

Britain on 'tortuous' road to save flora and fauna

NICHOLAS SCHOON

Pollution 'killing Scottish rivers'

JOHN ARLIDGE

Heidi high

Five hundred years of democracy, said Orson Welles contemptuously, and Switzerland has produced... the cuckoo clock. Orson, you spoke too soon. Unknown to all but the drug cognoscenti, Switzerland is now the only country in Europe to grow cannabis legally and unsupervised by government. You can make food and clothing from it. You can even smoke it. Mike Bygrave reports. Photograph by Sandro Sodano

Science: Time to take the bull by the horns

The new head of Kenya's Wildlife Service believes we must take a less sentimental approach to conservation, says Richard D North

The Duke and the forest ANOTHER VIEW Robin Pellew

The Independent reports that the Duke of Edinburgh, in his capacity as president of the World Wide Fund for Nature International, has not opposed the proposed mining by Rio Tinto Zinc of the coastal forests of southern Madagascar. It is important to make WWF's position on this issue clear.
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Mau Mau uprising: Kenyans still waiting for justice join class action over Britain's role in the emergency

Kenyans still waiting for justice over Mau Mau uprising

Thousands join class action over Britain's role in the emergency
Isis in Iraq: The trauma of the last six months has overwhelmed the remaining Christians in the country

The last Christians in Iraq

After 2,000 years, a community will try anything – including pretending to convert to Islam – to avoid losing everything, says Patrick Cockburn
Black Friday: Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Britain braced for Black Friday
Bill Cosby's persona goes from America's dad to date-rape drugs

From America's dad to date-rape drugs

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Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

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Oh come, all ye multi-faithful: The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?

Oh come, all ye multi-faithful

The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?
Dr Charles Heatley: The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

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When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible
Look what's mushrooming now! Meat-free recipes and food scandals help one growing sector

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Meat-free recipes and food scandals help one growing sector
Neil Findlay is more a pink shrimp than a red firebrand

More a pink shrimp than a red firebrand

The vilification of the potential Scottish Labour leader Neil Findlay shows how one-note politics is today, says DJ Taylor
Bill Granger recipes: Tenderstem broccoli omelette; Fried eggs with Mexican-style tomato and chilli sauce; Pan-fried cavolo nero with soft-boiled egg

Oeuf quake

Bill Granger's cracking egg recipes
Terry Venables: Wayne Rooney is roaring again and the world knows that England are back

Terry Venables column

Wayne Rooney is roaring again and the world knows that England are back
Michael Calvin: Abject leadership is allowing football’s age-old sores to fester

Abject leadership is allowing football’s age-old sores to fester

Those at the top are allowing the same issues to go unchallenged, says Michael Calvin