Travel

Mons is embracing the future as it prepares for its role as next year’s European Capital of Culture, but it’s also steeped in intriguing history. Philip Sweeney explores its two sides

5 ways elephants changed history: A brief history of stomping victories and disastrous reversals

It was the arrival of the cannon in the 19th century that finally heralded the end of elephants being used as an instrument of war. Until that time, from as early as 1000BC, they trampled across battlefields around the globe, through wars in places as far flung as Yemen and Sri Lanka.

Morrissey's autobiography, published by Penguin Classics, is not your average celebrity memoir

Morrissey: 'gay' relationship edited from US edition of autobiography

Lines about the singer's relationship with Jake Owen Walters have been cut

A digital depiction of a plan for Soho in 1954 shows the district built over with platforms, with glass-bottomed canals following street patterns and 24-storey towers

Exhibition reveals how London could have looked if radical development projects from the past century were given green light

From knocking most of Covent Garden to building castles in the sky over Soho, London would look very different today if it wasn’t for conservationists

A forgotten episode in Russian history leaves links with the Philippines

Guiuan was central to a remarkable part of the Cold War

Bletchley Park

Remains of two of Bletchley Park's earliest World War Two buildings are discovered

The brick footings of two huts were revealed as workmen were digging up one of the former code-breaking centre's car parks

Official figures have revealed that the Government is breaking its promise to ensure that a new council house or flat is built to replace every one sold to tenants

Ministers ‘breaking promise over new council homes’

The Government is breaking its promise to ensure that a new council house or flat is built to replace every one sold to tenants, official figures have revealed.

Ashes in my Mouth, Sand in my Shoes, By Per Petterson, Translated by Don Bartlett - Review

This is a small book that packs a punch. Arvid Jansen lives with his mother, father and sister, Gry, in early-1960s Sweden in the shadow of the Cold War – his Uncle Rolf hates communists. The family is poor, Dad is a factory worker and they live in a leaky tower block. Arvid is a frail, hyper-sensitive child who stays in bed for four days when told that nuclear war may end the world. His imaginative neuroses determine his actions – he smashes the clock to release the caged tiger because he can’t bear his mother ageing and, for him, six-and-a-half is “enough”.

The Afghan president Hamid Karzai said the airstrike was carried out by a drone

Top US commander apologises for Afghan drone strike that killed child

The top US commander in Afghanistan apologised to President Hamid Karzai for a drone strike that killed a child and NATO promised an investigation as rising tensions threatened efforts to persuade the Afghan leader to sign a long-delayed security agreement.

North Korea parades detained US pensioner Merrill Newman as war criminal

North Korea showcased a US veteran on Saturday who they accuse of killing civilians during the Korean War 60 years ago in a video of the 85-year-old making a full 'confession' and apology as if the battles are still continuing today.

Books of the year 2013: War

Private Alex Stringer, of the Royal Logistic Corps, was 20 when he was blown up in Afghanistan: "The reason I lost my left leg so high up is because the burning paint cooked my left leg all the way down to the bone. But if I hadn't set myself on fire, I would have bled out and died – as a result of it, all the arteries became cauterised".

Edwina Currie unveils the new version of the British Lion Code of Practice at Portcullis House in London

A safe pair of hands? Edwina Currie launches egg safety code

Edwina Currie, the former Health minister who once nearly bankrupted Britain’s egg producers, has been chosen to promote the new version of the red British Lion, which tells you that an egg is safe to eat.

Dirty Wars: Film review - criminality at the heart of the American system

(15) Richard Rowley, 86 mins

Michael Clarke and the Ashes: The shocking thing about sledging is not the damage it causes but how witless it is

England and Australia might just as well indulge in a spot of ice hockey-style brawling

Protestors battle riots police with tear gas outside the Cabinet of Ministers building in Kiev amidst the biggest protest in the Ukraine since its Orange Revolution in 2004

Ukraine protests: Tens of thousands protest against government's scrapped EU deal

A hundred thousand protestors take to the streets after President Victor Yanukovich pulls out of a historic deal with the EU amid rumours of Russian pressure. The east-west divide is rearing its head again, Max Tucker reports from Kiev

Paperback review: Her Privates We, by Frederic Manning

Frederic Manning, an Australian writer who settled in Britain in 1903, was little known before this fictionalised account of his experiences in the trenches was published in 1930, attracting praise from Hemingway and E M Forster. But while the wartime poetry of Wilfred Owen and Rupert Brooke has become lodged in the collective consciousness, Manning’s extraordinary novel, reissued here by Serpent’s Tail, remains somewhat obscure.

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

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Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

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Who is Oliver Bonas?

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Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

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Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

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Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

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Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

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